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Full text of "Morgan's Freemasonry exposed and explained: showing the origin, history and nature of Masonry, its effects on the government, and the Christian religion and containing a key to all the degrees of Freemasonry, giving a clear and correct view of the manner of conferring the different degrees, as practiced in all Lodges throughout the globe, together with the means to be used by such as are not Masons to gain admission therein, the whole intended as a guide to the craft and a light to the unenlightened"

Morgans 

Freemasonry 

Exposed and Explained 



282445 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Brock University - University of Toronto Libraries 



http://archive.org/details/morgansfreemasonOOmorg 



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MORGAN'S 

FREEMASONRY 



EXPOSED AND EXPLAINED. 



iSMI 



£ 1 



ITS EFFECT ON THE GOVERNMENT, 

And tlie Olir-istiar? Religion, 

AND CONTAINING 

-A. T3L. E5 Y 

TO ALL THE DEGREES OF FREEMASONRY, 

GIVING A CLEAR AND CORRECT VIEW OF THE MANNER OF CONFERRING THE DIFFERENT 

DEGREES, AS PRACTICED IN ALL LODGES THROUGHOUT THE GLOBE ; TOGETHER WITH 

THE MEANS TO BE USED BY SUCH AS ARE NOT MA80NS TO GAIN ADMISSION 

THEREIN, WITH THE VERDICT OF THE JURY IN RELATION TO THE 

ABDUCTION AND MURDER OF THE AUTHOR 

THE WHOLE INTENDED AS A GUIDE TO THE CRAFT AND A LIGHT 
TO THE UNENLIGHTENED. 

By Captain William Morgan. 



FITZGERALD PUBLISHING CORPORATION 

SUCCESSOR TO 

DICK 8b FITZGERALD 
NEW YORK 



7% Y» v 

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Masonic Facts for Masons 

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standing the truths of the subject, which have very great significance. The following 
important questions are treated in such a way that every Master, Chaplain and Member 
may understand what " Speculative Masonry " or the " Science cf Morals " consists in, 
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Duncan's Rituale der Freimaurerei 

A Guide, in the German language, to the Three Symbolic Degrees of the Ancient 
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Patriarchal, Golden Rule and Royal Purple Degrees, including the Rebekah or Ladies' 
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FITZGERALD PUBLISHING CORPORATION 

Successor to DICK & FITZGERALD 
P O. B.* 975 NEW YORK 18 Vesey Street 



MORGAN'S 

FREEMASONRY 

EXPOSED AND EXPLAINED 

SHOWING THE 

ORIGIN, HISTORY AND NATURE OF 

MASONRY 

ITS EFFECTS ON THE GOVERNMENT, AND THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION 

AND CONTAINING 

A KEY 

TO ALL THE DEGREES OF FREEMASONRY 

GIVING A CLEAR AND CORRECT VIEW OF ITHE MANNER OF CONFERRING THE 

DIFFERENT DEGREES, AS PRACTICED IN ALL LODGES THROUGHOUT THE 

GLOBE, TOGETHER WITH THE MEANS TO BE USED BY SUCH AS 

ARE NOT MASONS TO GAIN ADMISSION THEREIN 

THE WHOLE INTENDED AS A GUIDE TO THE CRAFT AND A LIGHT 
TO THE UNENLIGHTENED 

By CAPTAIN WILLIAM MORGAN 



FITZGERALD PUBLISHING CORPORATION 

Successor to 

DICK AND FITZGERALD 
NEW YORK 



THE FATE OF WILLIAM MORGAN- 



The circumstances surrounding the mysterious disappearance of Oapt. Wm. 
Morgan in 1826, and the details of his abduction were well known at the time, and 
substantiated at the trial and conviction of several persons who were concerned in 
the outrag \ 

In the autumn of 1827 the body of a man was found on the shore of Lake 
Ontario, near the mouth of Oak Orchard Creek. This body was identified by Mrs. 
Morgan and Dr. Strong as the remains of William Morgan by their accurate 
description of it before they were permitted to see it. The scar on the foot, the 
teeth being double all round, the one missing and the other broken tooth were 
correctly located, and found to be as described. 

Some doubt was afterwards raised by the identification of the clothing by a 
Mrs. Monroe, as that worn by her husband, although the personal characteristics 
TOre entirely different from those of Mr. Monroe. 

It is also well known that the late Thurlow Weed was one of the most energetie 
in his attempts to penetrate the mystery and bring the offenders to justice. And 
after his death, the following sworn particulars were revealed, through tm> 
confession of John Whitney, who was one of the persons who actually abducted 
Morgan. 

When it became known that Morgan was preparing his Expose of Masonry, 
which was published by Col. Miller, the Freemasons of Batavia, Le Roy and 
Rochester determined to have him carried off to Canada. He was taken and 
lodged in Fort Niagara. 

The refusal of the Masons in Canada to have anything to do with Morgan dis- 
appointed his abductors. At a banquet at Lewiston after the installation of a 
Royal Arch Chapter, five persons, Col. William King, Mr. Whitney, Mr. Howard, 
Mr. Chubbuck, and Mr. Garside, werif driven in a carriage, furnished by Majoi 
Barton, to Fort Niagara. They informed Morgan that the arrangements for send- 
ing him to Canada were completed, and that his family would soon follow him. 

Morgan walked with his supposed friends to the boat, which was rowed to the 
mouth of the river. A rope with sinkers was bound around his body, and Morgan 
was thrown overboard. 

This statement of Thurlow Weed was sworn to by him as below. 

City and County of New York, ss.; 

Thurlow Weed, being duly sworn, says that the foregoing statements 
are true. 

(Signed) Thurlow Weed, 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 28th day of September, 1882. 

(Signed) Spencer C Doty, Notary Public, 

17 Union Square, New York City 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 



%. DESCRIPTION OF THE CEREMONIES USED IN OPENING A LODGE OF ENTERED APPRENTICE 
MASONS ; WHICH IS THE SAME IN ALL THE UPPER DEGREES WITH THE EXCEPTION OF THE 
DIFFERENCE IN THE SIGNS, DUE-GUARDS, GRIPS, PASS-GRIPS, WORDS AND THEIR SEVERAL 
NAMES ; ALL OF WHICH WILL BE GIVEN AND EXPLAINED IN THEIR PROPER PLACES AS THE 
WORK PROGRESSES. 

One rap calls the Lodge to order — one calls up the Junior and 
Senior Deacons — two raps call up all the subordinate officers, and 
three all the members of the Lodge. 

The Master having called the Lodge to order, and the officers all 
seated the Master says to the Junior Warden, i Brother Junior, are 
they all Entered. Apprentice Masons in the South ? ' Ans. ' They 
are, Worshipful/ Master to the Senior W T arden, ' Brother Senior, 
are they all Entered Apprentice Masons in the West ? ' Ans. ' They 
are, Worshipful.' The Master then says, ' They are, in the East/ at 
the same time he gives a rap with the common gavel or mallet, which 
calls up both Deacons. Master to Junior Deacon, ' Brother Junior, 
the first care of a Mason ? ' Ans. ' To see the Lodge tyled, Wor- 
shipful/ Master to Junior Deacon, • Attend to that part of your 
duty, and inform the Tyler that we are about to open a Lodge of 
Entered Apprentice Masons, and direct him to tyle accordingly/ The 
Tyler then steps to the door and gives three raps, which are answered 
by three from without; t]je Junior Deacon then gives one, which is 
also answered by the Tyler with one; the door is then partly opened, 
and the Junior Deacon delivers his message, and resumes his station, 
and says, ' The door is tyled, Worshipful/ (at the same time giving 
the due-guard, which is never omitted when the Master is addressed). 
The Master to the Junior Deacon, ' By whom ? 9 Ans. i By a Master 
Mason without the door, armed with the proper implement of his 
office/ Master to Junior Deacon, ' His duty there?' Ans. ' To 
keep off all cowans and eaves-droppers, see that none pass or repass 
without permission from the Master/ [Some say, without permission 
from the Chair.] Master to Junior Deacon, ' Brother Junior, your 
place in the Lodge ? ' Ans. ' At the right hand of the Senior Warden 
in the West/ Master to Junior Deacon, i Your business there, Brother 
Junior?' Ans. 'To wait on the Worshipful Master and Wardens, 
act as their proxy in the active duties of the Lodge, and take charge 
of the door/ Master to Junior Deacon, ' The Senior Deacon's place 
in the Lodge?' Ans. i At the right hand of the Worshipful Master 

3 



4 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

in the East.' (The Master while asking the last question, gives two 
raps, which call up all the subordinate officers.) Master to Senior 
Deacon, ' Your duty there, Brother Senior? ' Ans. ' To wait on the 
Worshipful Master and Wardens, act as their proxy in the active 
duties of the Lodge, attend to the preparation and introduction of 
candidates, and welcome and clothe all visiting brethren, (i. e. furnish 
them with an apron). Master to Senior Deacon, ' The Secretary's 
place in the Lodge, Brother Senior?' Ans. ' At the left hand of 
the Worshipful Master in the East/ Master to Secretary, ' Your 
duty there, Brother Secretary?' Ans. ' The better to observe the 
Worshipful Master's will and pleasure, record the proceedings of the 
Lodge ; transmit a copy of the same to the Grand Lodge, if required ; 
receive all moneys and money bills from the hands of the brethren, 
pay them over to the Treasurer, and take his receipt for the same/ 
The Master to the Secretary, l The Treasurer's place in the Lodge ? ' 
Ans. { At the right hand of the Worshipful Master,' Master to the 
Treasurer, 6 Your duty here, Brother Treasurer?' Ans. ( Duly to 
observe the Worshipful Master's will and pleasure ; receive all moneys 
and money bills from the hands of the Secretary; keep a just and 
true account of the same; pay them out by order of the Worshipful 
Master, and consent of the brethren.' The Master to the Treasurer, 
' The Junior Warden's place in the Lodge, Brother Treasurer ? ' Ans. 
' In the South, Worshipful.' Master to Junior Warden, ( Your busi- 
ness there, Brother Junior? 9 Ans. ( As the sun in the South at high 
meridian is the beauty and glory of the day, so stands the Junior 
Warden in the South, the better to observe the time, call the Crafts 
from labor to refreshment, superintend them during the time thereof, 
see that none convert the hours of refreshment into that of intemper- 
ance or excess; and call them on again in due season, that the 
Worshipful Master may have honor, and they pleasure and profit 
thereby.' Master to the Junior Warden, ' The Senior Warden's place 
in the Lodge ? ' Ans. ' In the West, Worshipful.' Master to Senior 
Warden, 'Your duty there, Brother Senior?' Ans. ' As the sun sets 
in the West to close the day, so stands the Senior Warden in the West 
to assist the Worshipful Master in opening his Lodge, take care of the 
jewels and implements, see that none be lost, pay the Crafts their 
wages, if any be due, and see that none go away dissatisfied.' Master 
to the Senior Warden, ' The Master's place in the Lodge ? ' Ans. i In 
the East, Worshipful.' Master to the Senior Warden, 'His duty 
there?' Ans. 'As the sun rises in the East to open and adorn the 
day, so presides the Worshipful Master in the East to open and adorn 
his Lodge, set his Crafts to work with good and w T holesome laws, or 
cause the same to be done.' The Master now gives three raps, when 
all the brethren rise and the Master taking off his hat proceeds as 
follows : ' In like manner, so do I, strictly forbidding all profane 
language, private committees, or any other disorderly conduct, whereby 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 5 

the peace and harmony of this Lodge may be interrupted while en- 
gaged in its lawful pursuits, under no less penalty than the bye-laws 
or such penalty as a majority of the brethren present may see fit to 
inflict. Brethren, attend to giving the signs.' (Here Lodges differ 
very much. In some, they declare the Lodge opened as follows before 
they give the signs) : The Master (all the brethren imitating him) 
extends his left arm from his body so as to form an angle of about 
forty-five degrees, and holds his right hand transversely across his left, 
the palms thereof about one inch apart. This is called the first sign 
of a Mason — is the sign of distress in this degree, and alludes to the 
position a candidate's hands are placed in when he takes the obligation 
of an Entered Apprentice Mason. The Master then draws his right 
hand across his .throat, the hand open, with the thumb next to the 
throat, and drops it down by his side. This is called the due-guard 
of an Entered Apprentice Mason (many call it the sign), and alludes 
to the penalty of the obligation. (See Obligation.) The Master 
then declares the Lodge opened, in the following manner : i I now 
declare this Lodge of Entered Apprentice Masons duly opened for the 
dispatch of business/ The Senior Warden declares it to the Junioi 
Warden, and he to the brethren. ( Come, brethren, let us pray.' One 
of the following prayers is used: 

' Most holy and glorious God ! the great Architect of the Universe : 
the giver of all good gifts and graces: Thou hast promised that 
" Where two or three are gathered together in thy name, thou wilt be 
in the midst of them, and bless them." In thy name we assemble, 
most humbly beseeching thee to bless us in all our undertakings; that 
we may know and serve thee aright, and that all our actions may tend 
to thy glory and our advancement in knowledge and virtue. And we 
beseech thee, Lord God, to bless our present assembling; and to 
illuminate our minds through the influence of the Sun of Righteous- 
ness, that we may walk in the light of thy countenance ; and when the 
trials of our probationary state are over, be admitted into the Temple 
not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. Amen. So mote it be/ 

Another prayer, as often used at opening as closing. 

' Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell 
together in unity : it is like the precious ointment upon the head, that 
ran down upon the beard, even Aaron's beard, that went down to the 
skirts of his garment : as the dew of Hcrmon, and as the dew that 
descended upon the mountains of Zion, for there the Lord commanded 
the blessing, even life for ever more. Amen. So mote it be.' 

The Lodge being now open and ready to proceed to business, the 
Master directs the Secretary to read the minutes of the last meeting, 
which naturally brings to view the business of the present. 

If there are any candidates to be brought forward, that will be the 



6 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

first business attended to. I will therefore proceed with a description 
of the ceremonies used in the admission and initiation of a candidate 
into the first degree of Masonry. 

A person wishing to become a Mason must get some one who is a 
Mason to present his petition to a lodge, when if there are no serious 
objections, it will be entered on the minutes, and a' committee of two 
or three appointed to inquire into his character and report to the next 
regular communication. The following is a form of a petition used 
by a candidate; but a worthy candidate will not be rejected for want 
of formality in his petition. 

To the Worshipful Master, Wardens and Brethren of Lodge No. — , 
of Free and Accepted Masons: 

The subscriber, residing in , of lawful age, and by occupation 

a , begs leave to state that, unbiased by friends, and unin- 
fluenced by mercenary motives, he freely and voluntarily offers himself 
a candidate for the mysteries of Masonry, and that he is prompted to 
solicit this privilege by a favorable opinion conceived of the Institu- 
tion, a desire of knowledge, and a sincere wish of being serviceable to 
his fellow-creatures. Should his petition be granted, he will cheer- 
fully conform to all the ancient established usages and customs of the 
Fraternity. 

(Signed) A. B. 

At the next regular communication (if no serious objection appears 
against the candidate), the ballot-boxes will be passed; one black ball 
will reject a candidate. The boxes may be passed three times. The 
Deacons are the proper persons to pass them ; one of the boxes has 
black and white beans or balls in it, the other empty ; the one with the 
balls in it goes before, and furnishes each member with a black and 
white ball; the empty box follows and receives them. There are two 
holes in the top of this box with a small tube (generally) in each, one 
of which is black, and the other white, with a partition in the box. 
The members put both their balls in this box as their feelings dictate ; 
when the balls are received, the box is presented to the Master, Senior 
and Junior Wardens, who pronounce clear or not clear as the case may 
be. The ballot proving clear, the Candidate (if present) is conducted 
in a small preparation room adjoining the Lodge, when he is asked the 
following questions, and gives the following answers. Senior Deacon 
to Candidate, ' Do you sincerely declare, upon your honor, before these 
gentlemen, that unbiased by friends, uninfluenced by unworthy mo- 
tives, you freely and voluntarily offer yourself a Candidate for the 
mysteries of Masonry ? ' Ans. ' I do/ Senior Deacon to Candidate, 
( Do you sincerely declare upon your honor before these gentlemen, 
that you are prompted to solicit the privileges of Masonry, by a favor- 
able opinion conceived of the Institution, a desire of knowledge, and 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 7 

a sincere wish of being serviceable to your fellow-creatures ? ' Ans. ' I 
do.' Senior Deacon to Candidate, i Do you sincerely declare, upon 
your honor, before these gentlemen, that you will cheerfully conform 
to all the ancient established usages and customs of the Fraternity ? ' 
Ans. i I do/ After the above questions are proposed and answered, 
and the result reported to the Master, he says, ( Brethren, at the 
request of Mr. A. B., he has been proposed and accepted in regular 
form. I therefore recommend him as a proper Candidate for the 
mysteries of Masonry, and worthy to partake of the privileges of the 
Fraternity: and in consequence of a declaration of his intentions, 
voluntarily made, I believe he will cheerfully conform to the rules of 
the Order/ The Candidate, during the time, is divested of all his 
apparel (shirt excepted), and furnished with a pair of drawers, kept 
in the Lodge for the use of Candidates; the Candidate is then blind- 
folded, his left foot bare, his right in a slipper, his left breast and 
arm naked, and a rope, called a Cable-Tow, placed round his neck and 
left arm (the rope is not put round the arm in all Lodges), in which 
posture the Candidate is conducted to the door, where he is caused to 
give, or the Conductor gives, three distinct knocks, which are answered 
by three from within, the Conductor gives one more, which is also 
answered by one from within. The door is then partly opened, and 
the Junior Deacon generally asks, * Who comes there ? who comes 
there? who comes there?' Then the Conductor, alias the Senior Dea- 
con, answers, - A poor blind Candidate, who has long been desirous of 
having and receiving a part of the rights and benefits of this worship- 
ful Lodge, dedicated (some say erected) to God, and heLd forth to the 
holy Order of St. John, as all true fellows and brothers have done, 
who have gone this way before him/ The Junior Deacon then asks, 
( Is it of his own free will and accord he makes this request ? is he 
duly and truly prepared? worthy and well qualified? and properly 
avouched for?' All of which being answered in the affirmative, the 
Junior Deacon to Senior Deacon, ' By what further rights does he 
expect to obtain this benefit ? Ans. ' By being a man, free born, of 
lawful age, and under the tongue of good report/ The Junior Dea- 
con then says, ' Since this is the case, you will wait till the Worshipful 
Master in the East is made acquainted with his request, and the answer 
returned/ The Junior Deacon repairs to the Master, when the samp 
questions are asked, and answers are returned as at the door; after 
which, the Master says, ( Since he comes endowed with all these neces- 
sary qualifications, let him enter this Worshipful Lodge in the name 
of the Lord, and take heed on what he enters.' The Candidate then 
enters, the Junior Deacon at the same time pressing his naked left 
breast with the point of the compass, and asks the Candidate, ' Did 
you feel anything?' Ans. 'I did/ Junior Deacon to Candidate, 
'What was it?' Ans. ' A torture/ The Junior Deacon then says, 
'As this is a torture to your flesh, so may it ever be to your mind 



8 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

and conscience if ever you should attempt to reveal the secrets of 
Masonry unlawfully.' The Candidate is then conducted to the center 
of the Lodge, where he and the Senior Deacon kneel, and the Deacon 
says the following prayer: 

' Vouchsafe thine aid, Almighty Father of the Universe, to this our 
present convention; and grant that this Candidate for Masonry may 
dedicate and devote his life to thy service, and become a true and 
faithful brother among us! Indue him with a competency of thy 
divine wisdom, that by the secrets of our art he may be the better 
enabled to display the beauties of holiness to the honor of thy holy 
name. So mote it be. Amen ! ' 

The Master then asks the Candidate, ' In whom do you put your 
trust ?' Ans. 'In God.' The Master then takes him by the right 
hand and says, ' Since in God you put your trust, arise, follow your 
leader, and fear no danger.' The Senior Deacon then conducts the 
Candidate three times regularly round the Lodge, and halts at the 
Junior Warden in the South, where the same questions are asked, and 
answers returned as at the door. 

As the Candidate and Conductor are passing round the room, the 
Master reads the following passage of Scripture, and takes the same 
time to read it that they do to go round the Lodge three times. 

' Behold, how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell 
together in unity ! It is like the precious ointment upon the head, 
that ran down upon the beard, even Aaron's beard, that went down to 
the skirts of his garment : as the dew of Hermon, and as the dew that 
descended upon the mountains of Zion; for there the Lord commanded 
the blessing, even life for ever more.' 

The Candidate is then conducted to the Senior Warden in the West, 
where the same questions are asked, and answers returned as before;' 
from thence he is conducted to the Worshipful Master in the East, 
where the same questions are asked, and answers returned as before. 
The Master likewise demands of him, from whence he came and 
whither he is traveling. The Candidate answers, ' From the West, 
and traveling to the East.' Master inquires: 'Why do you leave the 
West and travel to the East?' Ans. ' In search of light.' Master 
then says, ' Since the Candidate is traveling in search of light, you 
will please conduct him back to the West, from whence he came, and 
put him in the care of the Senior Warden, who will teach him how to 
approach the East, the place of light, by advancing upon one upright 
regular step, to the first step, his feet forming the right angle of an 
oblong square, his body erect at the altar before the Master, and place 
him in a proper position to take upon him the solemn oath of obliga- 
tion of an Entered Apprentice Mason.' The Senior Warden receives 
the Candidate, and instructs him as directed. He first steps off with 
the left foot, and brings up the heel of the right into the hollow 
thereof, the heel of the right foot against the ankle of the left, will of 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 9 

course form the right angle of an oblong square; the Candidate then 
kneels on his left knee, and places his right foot so as to form a square 
with the left, he turns his foot round until the ankle bone is as much 
in front of him as the toes on the left foot ; the Candidate's left hand 
is then put under the Holy Bible, square and compass, and the right 
on them. This is the position in which a Candidate is placed when 
he takes upon him the oath or obligation of an Entered Apprentice 
Mason. As soon as the Candidate is placed in this position, the Wor- 
shipful Master approaches him, and says, l Mr. A. B., you are now 
placed in a proper position to take upon you the solemn oath or obliga- 
tion of an Entered Apprentice Mason, which I assure you is neither 
to affect your religion nor politics ; if you are willing to take it, repeat 
your name and say after me;' [and although many have refused to 
take any kind of an obligation, and begged for the privilege of retir- 
ing, yet none have made their escape; they have been either coerced 
or persuaded to submit. There are thousands who never return to 
the Lodge after they are initiated.] The following obligation is then 
administered : 

i I, A. B., of my own free will and accord, in presence of Almighty 
God and this worshipful Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons, dedi- 
cated to God and held forth to the holy order of St. John, do hereby 
and herein most solemnly and sincerely promise and swear that I will 
always hail, ever conceal, and never reveal any part, or parts, art, or 
arts, point, or points of the secret arts and mysteries of ancient Free- 
masonry, which I have received, am about to receive, or hereafter may 
be instructed in, to any person, or persons in the known world, except 
it be to a true and lawful Brother Mason, or within the body of a just 
and lawfully constituted Lodge, of such ; and not unto him, nor unto 
them whom I shall hear so to be, but unto him and them only whom 
I shall find so to be after strict trial and due examination or lawful 
information. Furthermore, do I promise and swear, that I will not 
write, print, stamp, stain, hew, cut, carve, indent, paint, or engrave 
it on anything movable or immovable, under the whole canopy of 
Heaven, whereby or whereon the least letter, figure, character, mark, 
stain, shadow, or resemblance of the same, may become legible or 
intelligible to myself or any other person in the knqwn world, whereby 
the secrets of Masonry may be unlawfully obtained through my un- 
worthiness. To all which I do most solemnly and sincerely promise 
and swear, without the least equivocation, mental reservation, or self 
evasion of mind in me whatever; binding myself under no less penalty 
than to have my throat cut across, my tongue torn out by the roots, 
and my body buried in the rough sands of the sea, at low water-mark, 
where the tide ebbs and flows twice in twenty-four hours ; so help me 
God, and keep me steadfast in the due performance of the same/ 

After the obligation, the Master addresses the Candidate in the 
following manner : ' Brother, to you the secrets of Masonry are about 



10 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

to be unveiled, and a brighter sun never shone lustre on your eyes: 
while prostrate before this sacred altar, do you not shudder at every 
crime ? have you not confidence in every virtue ? May these thoughts 
ever inspire you with the most noble sentiments; may you ever feel 
that elevation of soul, that shall scorn a dishonest act. Brother, what 
do you most desire ? ' Ans. ' Light/ Master to Brethren, * Brethren, 
stretch forth your hands and assist in bringing this new-made Brother 
from darkness to light/ The members having formed a circle round 
the Candidate, the Master says, ' And God said, Let there be light, 
and there was light/ At the same time all the brethren clap their 
hands, and stamp on the floor with their right foot as heavy as pos- 
sible, the bandage dropping from the Candidate's eyes at the same 
instant, which, after having been so long blind, and full of fearful 
apprehension all the time, this great and sudden transition from 
perfect darkness to a light brighter (if possible) than the meridian 
sun in a midsummer day, sometimes produces an alarming effect. I 
once knew a man to faint on being brought to light, and his recovery 
was quite doubtful for some time: however, he did come to, but he 
never returned to the Lodge again. I have often conversed with him 
on the subject; he is yet living, and will give a certificate in support 
of the above statement at any time, if requested. 

After the Candidate is brought to light, the Master addresses him 
as follows : ' Brother, on being brought to light, you first discover 
three great lights in Masonry, by the assistance of three lesser, they 
are thus explained: the three great lights in Masonry are the Holy 
Bible, Square, and Compass. The Holy Bible is given to us as a rule 
and guide for our faith and practice; the Square, to square our 
actions; and the Compass, to keep us in due bounds with all mankind, 
but more especially with the Brethren. The three lesser lights are 
three burning tapers, or candles, placed on candlesticks (some say or 
candles on pedestals), they represent the Sun, Moon, and Master of 
the Lodge, and are thus explained: As the sun rules the day, and the 
moon governs the night, so ought the Worshipful Master with equal 
regularity to rule and govern his Lodge, or cause the same to be done ; 
you next discover me as Master of this Lodge, approaching you from 
the East upon the first step of Masonry, under the sign and due-guard 
of an Entered Apprentice Mason. (The sign and due-guard has been 
explained.) This is the manner of giving them: imitate me as near 
as you can, keeping your position. First, step off with your left foot 
and bring the heel of the right into the hollow thereof, so as to form 
a square. (This is the first step in Masonry.) The following is the 
sign of an Entered Apprentice Mason, and is- the sign of distress in 
this degree; you are not to give it unless in distress. (It is given by 
holding your two hands transversely across each other, the right hand 
upward and one inch from the left.) The following is the due- 
guard of an Entered Apprentice Mason. (This is given by drawing 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 11 

your right hand across your throat, the thumb next to your throat, 
your arm as high as the elbow, in a horizontal position.) Brother, I 
now present you my right hand, in token of brotherly love and esteem, 
and with it the grip and name of the grip of an Entered Apprentice 
Mason/ The right hands are joined together as in shaking hands, 
and each sticks his thumb nail into the third joint or upper end of 
the fore-finger; the name of the grip is Boaz, and is to be given in the 
following manner and no other: the Master first gives the grip and 
word, and divides it for the instruction of the candidate; the ques- 
tions are as follows: The Master and Candidate holding each other 
by the grip, as before described, the Master says, ' What is this ? ' 
Ans. ' A grip.' Q. ' The grip of what ?' A. ' The grip of an Entered 
Apprentice Mason/ Q. ' Has it a name?' A. ' It has/ Q. 'Will 
you give it to me?' A. ' I did not so receive it, neither can I so 
impart it/ Q. ' What will you do with it?' A. 'Letter it or halve 
it/ Q. 'Halve it and begin/ A. 'You begin/ Q. 'Begin you/ 
A. 'BO/ Q. 'AZ.' A. 'BOAZ.' Master says, 'Right, Brother 
Boaz, I greet you. It is the name of the left-hand pillar of the porch 
of King Solomon's Temple — arise, Brother Boaz, and salute the 
Junior and Senior Wardens as such, and convince them that you have 
been regularly initiated as an Entered Apprentice Mason, and have 
got the sign, grip, and word/ The Master returns to his seat, while 
the Wardens are examining the Candidate, and gets a lamb-skin or 
white apron, presents it to the Candidate, and observes, 'Brother, I 
now present you with a lamb-skin or white apron ; it is an emblem of 
innocence, and the badge of a Mason; it has been worn by kings, 
princes and potentates of the earth, who have never been ashamed to 
wear it; it is more honorable than the diadems of kings, or pearls of 
princesses, when worthily worn; it is more ancient than the Golden 
Fleece or Roman Eagle ; more honorable than the Star and Garter, or 
any other order that can be conferred upon you at this, or any other 
time, except it be in the body of a just and lawfully constituted 
Lodge; you will carry it to the Senior Warden in the West, who will 
teach you how to wear it as an Entered Apprentice Mason/ The 
Senior Warden ties the apron on, and turns up the flap, instead of 
letting it fall down in front of the top of the apron. This is the w r ay 
Entered Apprentice Masons wear, or ought to wear their aprons until 
they are advanced. The Candidate is now conducted to the Master 
in the East, who says, ' Brother, as you are dressed, it is necessary you 
should have tools to work with; I will now present you with the 
working tools of an Entered Apprentice Mason, which are the twenty- 
four inch gauge and common gavel ; they are thus explained : The 
twenty-four inch gauge is an instrument made use of by operative 
Masons to measure and lay out their work, but we, as Free and 
Accepted Masons, make use of it for the more noble and glorious pur- 
pose of dividing our time. The twenty-four inches on the gauge, are 



12 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

sniblematical of the twenty-four hours in the day, which we are 
taught to divide into three equal parts, whereby we find eight hours 
for the service of God, and a worthy, distressed brother; eight hours 
for our usual vocations, and eight for refreshment and sleep; the 
com uion gavel is an instrument made use of by operative Masons to 
break off the corners of rough stones; the better to fit them for the 
builders' use, but we, as Free and Accepted Masons, use it for the 
more noble and glorious purpose of divesting our hearts and con- 
sciences of all the vices and superfluities of life, thereby fitting our 
minds as living and lively stones, for that spiritual building, that 
house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. I also present 
you with a new name; it is CAUTION, it teaches you that as you 
are barely instructed in the rudiments of Masonry, that you should 
be cautious over all your words and actions, particularly when before 
the enemies of Masonry. I shall next present you with three precious 
jewels, which are, a listening ear, a silent tongue, and a faithful heart. 
A listening ear teaches you to listen to the instructions of the Wor- 
shipful Master ; but more especially that you should listen to the calls 
and cries of a worthy distressed brother. A. silent tongue teaches you 
to be silent while in the Lodge, that the peace and harmony thereof 
may not be disturbed, but more especially, that you should be silent 
before the enemies of Masonry, that the Craft may not be brought into 
disrepute by your imprudence. A faithful heart teaches you to be 
faithful to the instructions of the Worshipful Master at all times, but" 
more especially, that you should be faithful, and keep and conceal the 
secrets of Masonry, and those of a brother when given to you in charge 
as such, that they may remain as secure and inviolable in your breast 
as in his own, before communicated to you. I further present you 
with check-words two; their names are truth and union, and are thus 
explained: Truth is a Divine attribute, and the foundation of every 
virtue; to be good and true, is the first lesson w T e are taught in 
Masonry; on this theme we contemplate, and by its dictates endeavor 
to regulate our conduct; hence, while influenced by this principle 
hypocrisy and deceit are unknown among us; sincerity and plain 
dealing distinguish us, and the heart and tongue join in promoting 
each other's welfare and rejoicing in each other's prosperity. 

Union, is that kind of friendship which ought to appear conspicuous 
in every Mason's conduct. It is so closely allied to the Divine attri- 
bute, truth, that he who enjoys the one, is seldom destitute of the 
other. Should interest, honor, prejudice, or human depravity, ever 
induce you to violate any part of the sacred trust we now repose in 
you, let these two important words, at the earliest insinuation, teach 
you to put on the check-line of truth, which will infallibly direct you 
to pursue that straight and narrow path which ends in the full enjoy- 
ment of the Grand Lodge above; where we shall all meet as Masons 
and members of the same family, in peace, harmony and love; where 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 13 



all discord on account of politics, religion, or private opinion shall be 
unknown, and banished from within our walls. 

' Brother, it has been the custom from time immemorial to demand, 
or ask, from a newly-made brother, something of a metallic kind, 
not so much on account of its intrinsic value, but that it may be 
deposited in the archives of the Lodge, as a memorial, that you was 
herein made a Mason ; a small trifle will be sufficient. Anything of 
a metallic kind will do; if you have no money, anything of a metallic 
nature will be sufficient; even a button will do.' (The candidate 
says he has nothing about him; it is known he has nothing.) i Search 
yourself/ the Master replies. He is assisted in searching, nothing is 
found. i Perhaps you can borrow a trifle/ says the Master. (He 
tries to borrow, none will lend him — he proposes to go into the other 
room where his clothes are; he is not permitted. If a stranger, he is 
very much embarrassed.) Master to Candidate, i Brother, let this 
ever be a striking lesson to you, and teach you, if you should evez>^ 
see a friend, but more especially a brother, in a like penniless situa- 
tion, to contribute as liberally to his relief as his situation may require, 
and your abilities will admit, without material injury to yourself or 
family/ Master to Senior Deacon, ' You will conduct the Candidate 
back from whence he came, and invest him of what he has been 
divested, and let him return for further instruction/ The Candidate 
is then conducted to the preparation room and invested of what he 
has been divested, and returns to the North-East corner of the Lodge, 
and is taught how to stand upright like a man; when and where the 
following charge is, or ought to be delivered to him; though it is 
omitted nine times out of ten, as are near one-half of the ceremonies. 

Master to the Candidate, i Brother, as you are now initiated into 
the first principles of Masonry, I congratulate you upon having been 
accepted into this ancient and honorable Order; ancient, as having 
subsisted from time immemorial; and honorable, as tending in every 
particular so to render all men who will be conformable to its prin- 
ciples. No institution was ever raised on a better principle, or more 
solid foundation, nor were ever more excellent rules and useful 
maxims laid down than are inculcated in the several Masonic lectures. 
The greatest and best of men in all ages have been encouragers and 
promoters of the art, and have never deemed it derogatory to their 
dignity to level themselves with the fraternity, extend their privileges, 
and patronize their assemblies. 

' There are three great duties which, as a Mason, you are charged 
to inculcate. To God, your neighbor, and yourself. To God, in 
never mentioning his name, but with that reverential awe that is due 
from a creature to his Creator ; to implore his aid in all your laudable 
undertakings, and to esteem him as the chief Good. To your neigh- 
bor, in acting upon the square, and doing unto him as you wish he 
should do unto you ; and to yourself, in avoiding all irregularity or 



14 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

intemperance, which may impair your faculties, or debase the dignity 
of your profession. A zealous attachment to these principles will 
ensure public and private esteem. In the state, you are to be a quiet 
and peaceable subject, true to your government and just to your 
country; you are not to countenance disloyalty, but faithfully to 
submit to legal authority, and conform with cheerfulness to the gov- 
ernment of the country in which you live. In your outward demeanor, 
be particularly careful to avoid censure or reproach. Although your 
frequent appearance at our regular meetings is earnestly solicited, 
yet it is not meant that Masonry should interfere with your necessary 
vocations; for these are on no account to be neglected: neither are 
you to suffer your zeal for the Institution to lead you into argument 
with those who, through ignorance, may ridicule it. At your leisure 
hours, that you may improve in Masonic knowledge, you are to con- 
verse with well-informed brethren, who will be always as ready to 
give, as you will be to receive information. Finally, keep sacred and 
inviolable the mysteries of the Order, as these are to distinguish you 
from the rest of the community, and mark your consequence among 
Masons. If, in the circle of your acquaintance, you find a person 
desirous of being initiated into Masonry, be particularly attentive not 
to recommend him, unless you are convinced he will conform to our 
rules; that the honor, glory and reputation of the Institution may be 
firmly established, and the world at large convinced of its good 
effects/ 

The work of the evening being over, I will proceed to give a 
description of the manner of closing the Lodge. It is a very common 
practice, in Lodges, to close a Lodge of Entered Apprentices, and 
open a Lodge of Fellow Crafts, and close that, and open a Master 
Masons' Lodge, all in the same evening. 

Some brother generally makes a motion that the Lodge be closed; 
it being seconded and carried : — 

The Master to the Junior Deacon — ' Brother Junior,*' (giving one 
rap, which calls up both Deacons,) 'the first as well as the last care 
of a Mason?' Ans. * To see the Lodge tyled, your Worshipful.' 
Master to Junior Deacon, ' Attend to that part of your duty, and 
inform the Tyler that we are about to close this Lodge of Entered 
Apprentice Masons, and direct him to tyle accordingly.' The Junior 
Deacon steps to the door, and gives three raps, which are answered 
by the Tyler with three more; the Junior Deacon then gives one, 
which is also answered by the Tyler by one. The Junior Deacon then 
opens the door, delivers his message, and resumes his place in the 
Lodge, and says, ' The door is tyled, Worshipful.' Master to Junior 
Deacon, ' By whom ? ' Ans. ( By a Master Mason without the door, 
armed with the proper implement of his office.' Master to Junior 
Deacon, ' His business there ? ' Ans. ' To keep off all cowans and 
eaves-droppers, and see that none pass or repass without permission 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 15 

from the Chair.' Master to Junior Deacon, ' Your place in the 
Lodge, Brother Junior ?' Ans. ' At the right hand of the Senior 
Warden in the West.' Master to Junior Deacon, ' Your duty there ? ' 
Ans. ' To wait on the Worshipful Master and Wardens, act as their 
proxy in the active duties of the Lodge, and take charge of the door/ 
Master to the Junior Deacon, * The Senior Deacon's place in the 
Lodge?' Ans. ' At the right hand of the Worshipful Master in the 
East.' Master to Senior Deacon, ' Your duty there, Brother Senior ? * 
Ans. ' To wait on the Worshipful Master and Wardens, act as their 
proxy in the active duties of the Lodge, attend to the preparation and 
introduction of Candidates, receive and clothe all visiting Brethren/ 
Master to the Senior Deacon, ' The Secretary's place in the Lodge ? ' 
Ans. ' At your left hand, Worshipful/ Master to Secretary, ' Your 
duty there, Brother Secretary?' Ans. ' Duly to observe the Master's 
will and pleasure; record the proceedings of the Lodge; transmit a 
copy of the same to the Grand Lodge, if required; receive all moneys 
and money bills from the hands of the brethren ; pay them over to the 
Treasurer, and take his receipt for the same/ Master to the Secre- 
tary, ' The Treasurer's place in the Lodge?' Ans. ' At the right 
hand of the Worshipful Master/ Master to Treasurer, ' Your busi- 
ness there, Brother Treasurer? ' Ans. i Duly to observe the Worship- 
ful Master's will and pleasure; receive all moneys and money bills 
from the hands of the Secretary; keep a just and accurate account 
of the same; pay them out by order of the Worshipful Master and 
consent of the brethren.' Master to the Treasurer, i The Junior 
Warden's place in the Lodge ? ' Ans. ( In the South, Worshipful/ 
Master to the Junior Warden, ' Your business there, Brother Junior ? ' 
Ans. ' As the sun in the South, at high meridian, is the beauty and 
glory of the day, so stands the Junior Warden in the South, at high 
twelve, the better to observe the time, call the Crafts from labor to 
refreshment, superintend them during the hours thereof, see that 
none convert the purposes of refreshment into that of excess or intem- 
perance, call them on again in due season, that the Worshipful Master 
may have honor, and they pleasure and profit thereby/ The Master 
to the Junior Warden [I wish the reader to take particular notice, 
that in closing the Lodge, the Master asks the Junior Warden as 
follows : i The Master's place in the Lodge ? ' and in opening, he asks 
the Senior Warden the same question] ' The Master's place in 
the Lodge ? ' Ans. * In the East, Worshipful/ Master to Junior 
Warden, ( His duty there?' Ans. e . As the sun rises in the East, to 
open and adorn the day, so presides the Worshipful Master in the 
East, to open and adorn his Lodge, set his Crafts to work with good 
and wholesome laws, or cause the same to be done/ Master to the 
Junior Warden, ' The Senior Warden's place in the Lodge?' Ans. 
( In the West, Worshipful/ Master to Senior Warden, ' Your business 
there, Brother Senior?' Ann " As the sun sets in the West to close 



16 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

the day, so stands the Sesior Warden in the West, to assist the 
Worshipful Master in opening and closing the Lodge, take care of 
the jewels and implements, see that none be lost, pay the Crafts their 
wages, if any be due, and see that none go away dissatisfied.' The 
Master, now gives three raps, when all the brethren rise, and the 
Master asks, ' Are you all satisfied ? ' They answer in the affirmative, 
by giving the due-guard. Should the Master discover that any de- 
clined giving it, inquiry is immediately made why it is so; and if any 
member is dissatisfied with any part of the proceedings, or with any 
brother, the subject is immediately investigated. Master to the 
brethren, i Attend to giving the signs ; as I do, so do you ; give them 
downwards/ (which is by giving the last in opening, first in closing. 
In closing, on this degree, you first draw your right hand across your 
throat, as hereinbefore described, and then hold your two hands over 
each other, as before described. This is the method pursued through 
all the degrees; and when opening on any of the upper degrees, all 
the signs of all the preceding degrees are given before you give the 
signs of the degree on which you are opening.) This being done, the 
Master proceeds, ' I now declare this Lodge of Entered Apprentice 
Masons regularly closed, in due and ancient form. Brother Junior 
Warden, please inform Brother Senior Warden, and request him to 
inform the brethren, that it is my will and pleasure that this Lodge 
of Entered Apprentice Masons be now closed, and stand closed until 
our next regular communication, unless a case or cases of emergency 
shall require earlier convention, of which every member shall be 
notified; during which time, it is seriously hoped, and expected, that 
every brother will demean himself as becomes a Free and Accepted 
Mason.' Junior Warden to Senior Warden, ' Brother Senior, it is 
the Worshipful Master's Will and pleasure, that this Lodge of Entered 
Apprentice Masons be closed, and stand closed until our next regular 
communication, unless a case or cases of emergency shall require 
earlier convention, of which every brother shall be notified; during 
which time it is seriously hoped, and expected, that every brother will 
demean himself as becomes a Free and Accepted Mason.' Senior 
Warden to the brethren, ' Brethren, you have heard the Worshipful 
Master's will and pleasure, as communicated to me by Brother Junior ; 
so let it be done.' Master to the Junior Warden, ' Brother Junior, 
how do Masons meet?' Ans. i On the level.' Master to Senior 
Warden, c How do Masons part?' Ans. i On the square.' Master to 
the Junior and Senior Wardens, 'Since we meet on the level, Brother 
Junior, and part on the square, Brother Senior, so let us ever meet 
and part, in the name of the Lord.' Here follows a jDrayer, some- 
times used. Master to the brethren, ' Brethren, let us pray.' 

' Supreme Architect of the Universe! accept our humble praises for 
the many mercies and blessings which thy bounty has conferred upon 
us, and especially for this friendly and social intercourse. Pardon, 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 17 

we beseech thee, whatever thou hast seen amiss in us since we have 
been together, and continue to us thy presence, protection and bless- 
ing. Make us sensible of the renewed obligations we are under to 
love thee supremely, and to be friendly to each other. May all our 
irregular passions be subdued, and may we daily increase in faith, 
hope and charity, but more especially in that charity which is the 
bond of peace, and perfection of every virtue. May we so practice 
thy precepts, that through the merits of the Redeemer, we may finally 
obtain thy promises, and find an acceptance through the gates, and 
into the Temple and City of our God. So mote it be. Amen/ 



A BENEDICTION OFTENER USED AT CLOSING THAN THE 
PRECEDING PRAYER. 

' May the blessing of Heaven rest upon us and all regular Masons ; 
may brotherly love prevail, and every moral and social virtue cement 
us. So mote it be. Amen/ 

After the prayer the following charge ought to be delivered; but it 
is seldom attended to; in a majority of Lodges it is never attended to. 

Master to brethren, ' Brethren, we are now about to quit this sacred 
retreat of friendship and virtue to mix again with the world. Amidst 
its concerns and employments forget not the duties which you have 
heard so frequently inculcated, and so forcibly recommended in this 
Lodge. Remember that around this altar, you have promised to 
befriend and relieve every brother who shall need your assistance. 
You have promised in the most friendly manner to remind him of 
his errors, and aid in reformation. These generous principles are to 
extend further: every human being has a claim upon your kind offices. 
Do good unto all. Recommend it more " especially to the household 
of the faithful." Finally, brethren, be ye all of one mind, live in 
peace and may the God of love and peace, delight to dwell with and 
bless you/ 

In some Lodges, after the charge is delivered, the Master says, 
c Brethren, form on the square/ When all brethren form a circle, 
and the Master followed by every brother (except in using the words) 
says, 6 And God said, Let there be light, and there was light/ At the 
same moment that the last of these words drop from the Master's 
lips, every member stamps with his right foot on the floor, and at the 
same instant, bring their hands together with equal force, and in such 
perfect unison with each other, that persons situated so as to hear it, 
would suppose it the precursor of some dreadful catastrophe. This 
is called, ' the shock.' 

Having described all the ceremonies and forms appertaining to the 
opening of a Lodge of Entered Apprentice Masons; setting them to 



18 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

work; initiating a Candidate, and closing the Lodge, I will now 
proceed to give the Lecture on this degree. It is divided into three 
sections. The lecture is nothing more or less than a recapitulation 
of the preceding ceremonies and forms by way of question and answer, 
and fully explains the same. In fact, the ceremonies and forms 
(generally Masonically called the work), and lectures are so much 
the same, that he who possesses a knowledge of the lectures, cannot 
be destitute of a knowledge of what the ceremonies and forms are. 
As the ceremonies used in opening and closing are the same in all 
the degrees, it is thought best to give the whole one insertion; it 
being the sincere wish of the writer that every reader should perfectly 
understand all the formulas of the whole Masconic fabric, as he 
then will thereby be able to form correct opinions of the propriety or 
impropriety, advantages or disadvantages of the same. 



FIRST SECTION OP THE LECTURE ON THE FIRST DEGREE 

MASONRY. 

Q. From whence come you as an Entered Apprentice Mason? 

A. From the holy Lodge of St. John of Jerusalem. 

Q. What recommendations do you bring? 

A. Recommendations from the Worshipful Master, Wardens and 
brethren of that Right Worshipful Lodge, whom greet you. 

Q. What comest thou hither to do? 

A. To learn to subdue my passions, and improve myself in the 
secret arts and mysteries of ancient Free Masonry. 

Q. You are a Mason then, I presume? 

A. I am. 

Q. How shall I know you to be a Mason? 

A. By certain signs and token. 

Q. What are signs? 

A. All right angles, horizontals, and perpendiculars. 

Q. What is a token? 

A. A certain, friendly and brotherly grip, whereby one Mason may 
know another in the dark as well as in the light. 

Q. Where was you first proposed to be made a Mason? 

A. In my heart. 

Q. Where secondly? 

A. In a room adjacent to the body of a just and lawfully consti- 
tuted Lodge of such. 

Q. How was you prepared? 

A. By being divested of all metals, neither naked nor clothed, bare 
foot nor shod, hoodwinked, with a Cable-Tow * about my neck, in 
which situation I was conducted to the door of the Lodge. 

* Three miles long. 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 19 

Q. You being hoodwinked, how did you know it to be a door? 

A. By first meeting with resistance and afterward gaining admis- 
sion. 

Q. How did you gain admission? 

A. By three distinct knocks from without, answered by the same 
from within. 

Q. What was said to you from within? 

A. Who comes there, who comes there, who comes there. 

Q. Your answer? 

A. A poor blind Candidate who has long been desirous of having 
and receiving a part of the rights and benefits of this worshipful 
Lodge, dedicated to God and held forth to the holy Order of St. John, 
as all true fellows and brothers have done, who have gone this way 
before me. 

Q. What further was said to you from within? 

A. I was asked if it was of my own free will and accord I made this 
request, if I was duly and truly proposed, worthy and well qualified; 
all of which being answered in the affirmative, I was asked by what 
further rights I expected to obtain so great a favor or benefit. 

Q. Your answer? 

A. By being a man, free born, of lawful age, and well recom- 
mended. 

Q. What was then said to you ? 

A. I was bid to wait until the Worshipful Master in the East was 
made acquainted with my request and his answer returned. 

Q. After his answer returned, what followed? 

Q. I was caused to enter the Lodge. 

Q. How? 

A. On the point of some sharp instrument pressing my naked left 
breast in the name of the Lord. 

Q. How was you then disposed of ? 

A. I was conducted to the center of the Lodge and there caused to 
kneel for the benefit of a prayer. [See page 8.] 

Q. After prayer what was said to you? 

A. I was asked in whom I put my trust. 

Q. Your answer? 

A. In God. 

Q. What followed? 

A. The Worshipful Master took me by the right hand and said, 
since in God you trust, arise, follow your leader, and fear no danger. 

Q. How was you then disposed of? 

A. I was conducted three times regularly round the Lodge and 
halted at the Junior Warden in the South, where the same questions 
were asked and answers returned as at the door. 

Q. How did the Junior Warden dispose of you? 

A. He ordered me to be conducted to the Senior Warden in the 



20 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

West, where the same questions were asked and answers returned as 
before. 

Q. How did the Senior Warden dispose of you? 

A. He ordered me to be conducted to the Worshipful Master in the 
East, where the same questions were asked and answers returned as 
before, who likewise demanded me from whence I came and whither 
I was traveling. 

Q. Your answer? 

A. From the West, and traveling to the East. 

Q. Why do you leave the West and travel to the East? 

A. In search of light. 

Q. How did the Worshipful Master then dispose of you? 

A. He ordered me to be conducted back to the West, from whence 
I came, and put in care of the Senior Warden, who taught me how 
to approach the East, the place of light, by advancing upon one 
upright regular step to the first step, my feet forming the right angle 
of an oblong square, my body erect at the altar before the Worshipful 
Master. 

Q. What did the Worshipful Master do with you ? 

A. He made an Entered Apprentice of me. 

Q. How? 

A. In due form. 

Q. What was that due form? 

A. My left knee bare bent, my right forming a square; my left 
hand supporting the Holy Bible, Square, and Compass, and my right 
covering the same; in which position I took upon me the solemn 
oath or obligation of an Entered Apprentice Mason. [See page 9.] 

Q. After you had taken your obligation what was said to you? 

A. I was asked what I most desired. 

Q. Your answer? 

A. Light. 

Q. Was you immediately brought to light? 

A. I was. 

Q. How? 

A. By the direction of the Master and assistance of the brethren. 

Q. What did you first discover after being brought to light? 

A. Three great Lights in Masonry, by the assistance of three lesser. 

Q. What were those three great Lights in Masonry ? 

A. The Holy Bible, Square, and Compass. 

Q. How are they explained? 

A. The Holy Bible is given to us as a guide for our faith and prac- 
tice; the Square, to tquare our actions; and the Compass, to keep us 
in due bounds with all mankind, but more especially with the brethren. 

Q. What were those three lesser lights? 

A. Three burning tapers, or candles on candlesticks. 

Q. What do they represent? 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 21 

A. The Sun, Moon, and Master of the Lodge. 

Q. How are they explained? 

A. As the Sun rules the day and the Moon governs the night, so 
ought the Worshipful Master to use his endeavors to rule and govern 
his Lodge with equal regularity, or cause the same to be done. 

Q. What did you next discover? 

A. The Worshipful Master approaching me from the East, under 
the sign and due-guard of an Entered Apprentice Mason, who pre- 
sented me with the right hand in token of brotherly love and esteem, 
and proceeded to give me the grip and word of an Entered Apprentice 
Mason, and bid me rise and salute the Junior and Senior Wardens 
and convince them that I had been regularly initiated as an Entered 
Apprentice Mason, and was in possession of the sign, grip and word. 

Q. What did you next discover ? 

A. The Worshipful Master a second time approaching me from the 
East, who presented me with a lamb-skin or white apron, which he 
said was an emblem of innocence, and the badge of a Mason ; that it 
had been worn by kings, princes and potentates of the earth, who had 
never been ashamed to wear it ; that it was more honorable than the 
diadems of kings, or pearls of princesses, when worthily worn, and 
more ancient than the Golden Fleece or Roman Eagle, more honor- 
able* than star or garter, or any other order that could be conferred 
upon me at that time or any time thereafter, except it be in the body 
of a just and lawfully constituted Lodge of Masons; and bid me 
carry it to the Senior Warden in the West, who taught me how to 
wear it as an Entered Apprentice Mason. 

Q. What was you next presented with? 

A. The working tools of an Entered Apprentice Mason. 

Q. What were they? 

A. The twenty-four inch gauge and common gavel. 

Q. How are they explained ? 

A. The twenty-four inch gauge is an instrument made use of by 
operative Masons to measure and lay out their work, but we, as Free 
and Accepted Masons, are taught to make use of it for the more noble 
and glorious purpose of dividing our time ; the twenty-four inches on 
the gauge are emblematical of the twenty-four hours in the day, which 
we are taught to divide into three equal parts, whereby we find eight 
hours for the service of God and a worthy distressed brother, eight 
hours for our usual vocation, and eight hours for refreshment and 
sleep. The common gavel is an instrument made use of by operative 
Masons to break off the corners of rough stones, the better to fit them 
for the builders' use, but we, as Free and Accepted Masons, are taught 
to make use of it for the more noble and glorious purpose of divesting 
our hearts and consciences of all the vices and superfluities of life, 
thereby fitting our minds as lively and living stones for that spiritual 
building, that house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. 



22 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

Q. What was you next presented with? 

A. A new name. 

Q. What was that? 

A. Caution. 

Q. What does it teach ? 

A. It teaches me, as I was barely instructed in the rudiments of 
Masonry, that I should be cautious over all my words and actions, 
especially when before its enemies. 

Q. What was you next presented with? 

A. Three precious jewels. 

Q. What were they ? 

A. A listening ear, a silent tongue, and a faithful heart. 

Q. What do they teach ? 

A. A listening ear, teaches me to listen to the instruction of the 
Worshipful Master, but more especially, that I should listen to the 
calls and cries of a worthy distressed brother. A silent tongue, 
teaches me to be silent in the Lodge, that the peace and harmony 
thereof may not be disturbed; but more especially, that I should be 
silent when before the enemies of Masonry. A faithful heart, that I 
should be faithful to the instructions of the Worshipful Master, at 
all times, but more especially that I should be faithful, and keep and 
conceal the secrets of Masonry and those of a brother, when delivered 
to me in charge, as such, that they may remain as secure and inviolable 
in my breast, as in his own before communicated to me. 

Q. What was you next presented with? 

A. Check words two. 

Q. What were they? 

A. Truth and Union. 

Q. How explained? 

A. Truth, is a Divine attribute, and the foundation of every virtue. 
To be good and true, are the first lessons we are taught in Masonry. 
On this theme we contemplate, and by its dictates endeavor to regulate 
our conduct : hence while influenced by this principle, hypocrisy and 
deceit are unknown amongst us; sincerity and plain dealing distin- 
guishes us; and the heart and tongue join in promoting each other's 
welfare, and rejoicing in each other's prosperity. 

Union is that kind of friendship, that ought to appear conspicuous 
in the conduct of every Mason. It is so closely allied to the Divine 
attribute, truth, that he who enjoys the one, is seldom destitute of the 
other. Should interest, honor, prejudice, or human depravity, ever 
influence you to violate any part of the sacred trust we now repose in 
you, let these two important words at the earliest insinuation, teach 
you to put on the check-line of .truth, which will infallibly direct you 
to pursue that straight and narrow path, which ends in the full 
enjoyment of the Grand Lodge above, where we shall all meet, as 
Masons and members of one familv: where all discord on account of 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 23 

religion, politics, or private opinion, will be unknown, and banished 
from within our walls. 

Q. What followed? 

A. The Worshipful Master in the East made a demand of me, of 
something of a metallic kind, which he said was not so much on 
account of its intrinsic value, as that it might be deposited in the 
archives of the Lodge, as a memorial that I had therein been made a 
Mason. 

Q. How did the Worshipful Master then dispose of you? 

A. He ordered me to be conducted out of the Lodge and invested 
of what I had been divested, and returned, for further instruction. 

Q. After you returned, how was you disposed of? 

A. I was conducted to the North-East corner of the Lodge, and 
there caused to stand upright like a man, my feet forming a square, 
and received a solemn injunction ever to walk and act uprightly 
before God and man, and in addition thereto received the following 
charge. (For this charge see page 13.) 

SECOND SECTION. 

Q. Why was you divested of all metals when you was made a 
Mason ? 

A. Because Masonry regards no man on account of his worldly 
w r ealth or honors; it is therefore the internal, and not the external 
qualification that recommend a man to Masons. 

Q. A second reason? 

A. There was neither the sound of an ax, hammer, or any other 
metal, tool, heard at the building of King Solomon's Temple. 

Q. How could so stupendous a fabric be erected without the sound 
of an ax, hammer, or any other metal tool? 

A. All the stones were hewed, squared, and numbered in the quar- 
ries where they were raised; all the timbers felled, and prepared in the 
forests of Lebanon, and carried down to Joppa on floats, and taken 
from thence up to Jerusalem, and set up with wooden malls, prepared 
for that purpose; which, when completed, every part thereof, fitted 
with that exact nicety, that it had more the resemblance of the handi- 
workmanship of the Supreme Architect of the Universe, than that 
of human hands. 

Q. Why was you neither naked nor clothed? 

A. As I was an object of distress at that time, it was to remind me, 
if ever I saw a friend, more especially a brother, in a like distressed 
situation, that I should contribute as liberally to his relief, as his 
situation required, and my abilities would admit without material 
injury to myself or family. 

Q. Why was you neither barefoot nor shod? 

A. It was an ancient Israelitish custom, adopted among Masons; 
and we read in the book of Ruth concerning their mode and manner 



24 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

of changing and redeeming, ' and to confirm all things, a brother 
plucked off his shoe and gave it to his neighbor, and that was testi- 
mony in Israel.' This, then, therefore we do in confirmation of a 
token, and as a pledge of our fidelity; thereby signifying that wie will 
renounce our own wills in all things, and become obedient to the laws 
of our ancient Institutions. 

Q. Why was you hoodwinked? 

A. That my heart might conceive, before my eyes beheld the 
beauties of Masonry. 

Q. A second reason? 

A. As I was in darkness at that time, it was to remind me that I 
should keep the whole world so respecting Masonry. 

Q. Why had you a Cable-Tow about your neck? 

A. In case I had not submitted to the manner and mode of my 
initiation, that I might have been led out of the Lodge without seeing 
the form and beauties thereof. 

Q. Why did you give three distinct knocks at the door? 

A. To alarm the Lodge, and let the Worshipful Master, Wardens 
and brethren know that a poor blind Candidate prayed admission. 

Q. What do those three distinct knocks allude to? 

A. A certain passage in Scripture, wherein it says, ' Ask and it 
shall be given, seek and ye shall find, knock and it shall be opened 
unto you.' 

Q. How did you apply this to your then case in Masonry? 

A. I asked the recommendations of a friend to become a Mason, 
I sought admission through his recommendations, and knocked and 
the door of Masonry opened unto me. 

Q.. Why was you caused to enter on the point of some sharp instru- 
ment pressing your naked left breast in the name of the Lord? 

A. As this was a torture to my flesh, so might the recollection of it 
ever be to my heart and conscience, if ever I attempted to reveal the 
secrets of Masonry unlawfully. 

Q. Why was you conducted to the center of the Lodge, and there 
caused to kneel for the benefit of a prayer? 

A. Before entering on this, or any other great and important under- 
taking, it is highly necessary to implore a blessing from Deity. 

Q. Why was you asked in whom you put your trust? 

A. Agreeably to the laws of our ancient Institution, no Atheist 
could be made a Mason; it was therefore necessary that I should 
believe in Deity ; otherwise, no oath or obligation could bind me. 

Q. Why did the Worshipful Master take you by the right hand, and 
bid you rise, follow your leader and fear no danger? 

A. As I was in darkness at that time, and could neither foresee nor 
avoid danger, it was to remind me that I was in the hands of an 
affectionate friend, in whose fidelity I might with safety confide. 

Q. Why was you conducted three times regularly round the Lodge? 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 25 

A. That the Worshipful Master, Wardens, and brethren, might see 
that I was duly and truly prepared. 

Q. Why did you meet with those several obstructions on the way? 

A. This and every other Lodge is, or ought to be, a true representa- 
tion of King Solomon's Temple, which, when completed, had guards 
stationed at the East, West, and South gates. 

Q. Why had they guards stationed at those several gates? 

A. To prevent any one from passing or repassing that was not duly 
qualified. 

Q. Why did you kneel on your left knee, and not on your right, 
or both ? 

A. The left side has ever been considered the weakest part of the 
body, it was therefore to remind me that the part I was then taking 
upon me was the weakest part of Masonry, it being that only of an 
Entered Apprentice. 

Q. Why was your right hand placed on the Holy Bible, Square 
and Compass, and not } 7 our left, or both? 

A. The right hand has ever been considered the seat of fidelity, and 
our ancient brethren worshiped the Deity under the name of Fides; 
which has sometimes been represented by two right-hands joined to- 
gether; at others, by two human figures holding each other by the 
right hand; the right hand, therefore, we use in this great and 
important undertaking to signify, in the strongest manner possible, 
the sincerity of our intentions in the business we are engaged. 

Q. Why did the Worshipful Master present you with a lamb-skin, 
or white apron? 

A. The lamb-skin has, in all ages, been deemed an emblem of inno- 
cence; he, therefore, who wears the lamb-skin, as a badge of a Mason, 
is thereby continually reminded of that purity of life and rectitude 
of conduct which is so essentially necessary to our gaining admission 
into the Celestial Lodge above, where the Supreme Architect of the 
Universe presides. 

Q. Why did the Master make a demand of you of something of a 
metallic nature? 

A. As I was in a poor and penniless situation at that time, it was 
to remind me if ever I saw a friend, but more especially a brother, in 
the like poor and penniless situation, that I should contribute as 
liberally to his relief as my abilities would admit and his situation 
required, without injuring myself or family. 

Q. Why was you conducted to the North-East corner of the Lodge, 
and there caused to stand upright like a man, your feet forming a 
square, receiving at the same time a solemn charge, ever to walk and 
act uprightly before God and Man? 

A. The first stone in every Masonic edifice is, or ought to be, placed 
at the North-East corner, that being the place where an Entered 
Apprentice Mason receives his first instructions to build his future 
Masonic edifice upon. 



26 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 



THIRD SECTION. 

Q. We have been saying a good deal about a Lodge, I want to know 
what constitutes a Lodge? 

A. A certain number of Free and Accepted Masons, duly assembled 
in a room, or place, with the Holy Bible, Square and Compass, and 
other Masonic implements, with a Charter from the Grand Lodge, 
empowering them to work. 

Q. Where did our ancient brethren meet before Lodges were 
erected ? 

A. On the highest hills and in the lowest vales. 

Q. Why on the highest hills and in the lowest vales? 

A. The better to guard against cowans aand enemies, either ascend- 
ing or descending, that the brethren might have timely notice of their 
approach to prevent being surprised. 

Q. What is the form of your Lodge? 

A. An oblong square. 

Q. How long? A. From East to West. 

Q. How wide? A. Between North and South. 

Q. How high ? A. From the surface of the earth to the highest 
heavens. 

Q. How deep ? A. From the surface to the center. 

Q. What supports your Lodge? 

A. Three large Columns or Pillars. 

Q. What are their names? 

A. Wisdom, Strength, and Beauty. 

Q. Why so? A. It is necessary there should be Wisdom to con- 
trive, Strength to support, and Beauty to adorn all great and import- 
ant undertakings; but more especially this of ours. 

Q. Has your Lodge any covering? 

A. It has a clouded canopy, or starry-decked heaven, where all 
good Masons hope to arrive. 

Q. How do they hope to arrive there? 

A. By the assistance of Jacob's ladder. 

Q. How many principal rounds has it got? 

A. Three. Q. What are their names? 

A. Faith, Hope and Charity. 

Q. What do they teach ? 

A. Faith in God, Hope in immortality, and Charity to all mankind. 

Q. Has your Lodge any furniture? 

A. It has, the Holy Bible, Square and Compass. 

Q. To whom do they belong? 

A. The Bible to God, the Square to the Master, and the Compass 
to the Craft. 

Q. How explained? 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 27 

A. The Bible to God, in being the inestimable gift of God to man 
for his instruction to guide him through the rugged paths of life; 
the Square to the Master, it being the proper emblem of his office; 
the Compass to the Craft — by due attention to which we are taught 
to limit our desires, curb our ambition, subdue our irregular appetites, 
and keep our passions and prejudices in due bounds with all mankind, 
but more especially with the brethren. 

Q. Has your Lodge any ornaments? 

A. It has ; the Mosaic, or chequered pavement ; the indented Tessel, 
that beautiful tesselated border which surrounds it, with the blazing 
star in the center. 

Q. What do they represent? 

A. The mosaic, or chequered pavement, represents this world, 
which, though chequered over with good and evil, yet brethren may 
walk together thereon and not stumble — the indented Tessel, with 
the blazing star in the center, the manifold blessings and comforts 
with which we are surrounded in this life, but more especially those 
which we hope to enjoy hereafter — the blazing star, the prudence 
which ought to appear conspicuous in the conduct of every Mason; 
but more especially commemorative of the Star which appeared in 
the East, to guide the wise men to Bethlehem, to proclaim the birth 
and the presence of the Son of God. 

Q. Has your Lodge any lights? 

A. It has three. 

Q. How are they situated? 

A. East, West and South. 

Q. Has it none in the North? 

A. It has not. 

Q. Why so? 

A. Because this and every other Lodge is, or ought to be, a true 
representation of King Solomon's Temple, which was situated north 
of the ecliptic; the sun and moon, therefore, during their rays from 
.the south no light was to be expected from the north; we, therefore, 
Masonically term the north a place of darkness. 

Q. Has your Lodge any Jewels? 

A. It has six ; three movable and three immovable, 

Q. What are the three immovable Jewels ? 

A. The Square, Level and Plumb. 

Q. What do they teach ? 

A. The Square, morality; the Level, equality; and the Plumb, recti- 
tude of life and conduct. 

Q. What are the three movable Jewels? 

A. The rough Ashlar, the perfect Ashlar, and the Trestle-Board. 

Q. What are they? 

A. The rough Ashlar is a stone in its rough and natural state, the 
perfect Ashlar is also a stone made ready by the working tools of 



28 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

the Fellow- Craft, to be adjusted in the building; and the Trestle- 
Board is for the Master Workman to draw his plans and designs 
upon. 

Q. What do they represent? 

A. The rough Ashlar represents man in his rude and imperfect 
state by nature; the perfect Ashlar also represents man in that state 
of perfection to which we all hope to arrive, by means of a virtuous 
life and education, our own endeavors, and the blessing of God. 
In erecting our temporal building, we pursue the plans and designs 
laid down by the master workman on his trestle-board; but in erect- 
ing our spiritual building, we pursue the plans and designs laid 
down by the Supreme Geometrician of the Universe in the Book 
of Life, which we, Masonically, term our spiritual trestle-board. 

Q. Whom did you serve? 

A. My Master. 

Q. How long? 

A. Six days. 

Q. What did you serve him with? 

A. Freedom, fervency and zeal. 

Q. What do they represent? 

A. Chalk, Charcoal and Earth. 

Q. Why so? 

A. There is nothing freer than Chalk, the slightest touch of which 
leaves a trace behind; nothing more fervent than heated Charcoal, 
it will melt the most obdurate metals; nothing more zealous than the 
Earth to bring forth. 

Q. How is your Lodge situated? 

A. Due East and West. 

Q: Why so? 

A. Because the sun rises in the East and sets in the West. 

Q. A second reason? 

A. The Gospel was first preached in the East, and is spreading 
to the West. 

Q. A third reason? 

A. The liberal arts and sciences began in the East, and are ex- 
tending to the West. 

Q. A fourth reason? 

A. Because all Churches and Chapels are, or ought to be, so sit- 
uated. 

Q. Why are all Churches and Chapels so situated ? 

A. Because King Solomon's Temple was so situated. 

Q. Why was King Solomon's Temple so situated? 

A. Because Moses, after conducting the Children of Israel through 
the Red Sea, by Divine command, erected a tabernacle to God and 
placed it due East and West ; which was to commemorate to the latest 
posterity that miraculous East wind that wrought their mighty 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 29 

deliverance; and this was an exact model of King Solomon's Temple. 
Since which time, every well-regulated and governed Lodge is, or 
ought to be, so situated. 

Q. To whom did our ancient brethren dedicate their lodges ? 

A. To King Solomon. 

Q. Why so ? A. Because King Solomon was our most ancient 
Grand Master. 

Q. To whom do modern Masons dedicate their Lodges? 

A. To St. John the Baptist, and St. John the Evangelist. 

Q. Why so ? A. Because they were the two most ancient Christian 
patrons of Masonry : and since their time, in every well-regulated 
and governed Lodge there has been a certain point within a circle, 
which circle is bounded on the East and West by two perpendicular 
parallel lines, representing the anniversary of St. John the Baptist, 
and St. John the Evangelist, who were two. perfect parallels as well 
in Masonry as in Christianity ; on the vortex of which rests the book 
of the Holy Scriptures, supporting Jacob's Ladder, which is said 
to reach to the watery clouds; and in passing round this circle we 
naturally touch on both these perpendicular parallel lines, as well as 
the Book of the Holy Scriptures and while a Mason keeps himself 
thus circumscribed, he cannot materially err. [Thus ends the first 
degree of Masonry, and the reader, who has read and paid attention 
to it, knows more of Masonry, than any Entered Apprentice in Chris- 
tendom, and more of this degree than one hundredth part of the 
Master Masons, or even Royal Arch Masons; for very few even 
attempt to learn the Lectures, or even the Obligations; they merely 
receive the degrees, and there stop, with the exception of a few 
who are fascinated with the idea of holding an office: they sometimes 
endeavor to qualify themselves to discharge the duties which devolve 
on them in their respective offices. The offices of Secretary and 
Treasurer, are by some considered the most important in the Lodge, 
particularly where there is much business done.] 

I will now introduce the reader to the second degree of Masonry. 
It is generally called passing, as will be seen in the lecture. I shall 
omit the ceremonies of opening and closing, as they are precisely the 
same as in the first degree, except two knocks are used in this degree, 
and the door is entered by the benefit of a pass-word ; it is Shibboleth. 
It will be explained in the lecture. 

The Candidate, as before, is taken into the preparation room and 
prepared in the manner following: all his clothing taken off except 
his shirt; furnished with a pair of drawers; his right breast bare; 
his left foot in a slipper, the right bare; a Cable-Tow twice round 
his neck; semi-hoodwinked, in which situation he is conducted to 
the door of the Lodge, where he gives two knocks, when the Senior 
Warden rises and says, ' Worshipful, while we are peaceably at work 
on the second degree of Masonry, under the influence of Faith, Hope, 



30 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

and Charity, the door of our Lodge is alarmed.' Master to Junior 
Deacon, ' Brother Junior, inquire the cause of that alarm.' [In 
many Lodges they come to the door, knock, are answered by the 
Junior Deacon, and come in without their being noticed by the 
Senior Warden or Master.] The Junior Deacon gives two raps on 
the inside of the door. The Candidate gives one without; it is 
answered by the Junior Deacon with one, when the door is partly 
opened by the Junior Deacon, who inquires, ' Who comes here ? who 
comes here ? ' The senior Deacon, who is or ought to be, the Con- 
ductor, answers, c A worthy brother who has been regularly initiated 
as an Entered Apprentice Mason, served a proper time as such, and now 
wishes for further light in Masonry, by being passed to the degree 
of Fellow-Craft.' Junior Deacon to Senior Deacon, 6 Is it of his 
own free will and accord he makes this request?' Ans. i It is/ 
Junior Deacon to Senior Deacon, ' Is he duly and truly prepared ? ' 
Ans. ' He is.' Junior Deacon to Senior Deacon, ' Is he worthy and 
well qualified?' Ans. ' He is.' Junior Deacon to Senior Deacon, 
( Has he made suitable proficiency in the preceding degree?' Ans. 
' He has.' [Very few know any more than they did the night they 
were initiated; have not heard their obligation repeated, nor one 
section of the Lecture, and in fact a very small proportion of Masons 
ever learn either.] Junior Deacon to Senior Deacon, ' By what 
further rights does he expect to obtain this benefit ? ' Ans. ' By the 
benefit of a pass-word.' Junior Deacon to Senior Deacon. ( Has he 
a pass-word?' Ans. ' He has not, but I have it for him. Junior Dea- 
con to Senior Deacon, i Give it to me.' The Senior Deacon whispers 
in the Junior Deacon's ear, ' Shibboleth/ The Junior Deacon says, 
' The pass is right ; since this is the case, you will wait until the 
Worshipful Master in the East is made acquainted with his request, 
and his answer returned.' The Junior Deacon then repairs to the 
Master and gives two knocks, as at the door, which are answered by 
two, by the Master; when the same questions are asked and answers 
returned as at the door ; after which the Master says, ' Since he 
comes indued with all these necessary qualifications, let him enter this 
Worshipful Lodge in the name of the Lord, and take heed on what 
he enters.' As he enters, the angle of the square is pressed hard 
against his naked right breast, at which time the Junior Deacon 
says, ' Brother, when you entered this Lodge the first time, you 
entered on the point of the compass pressing your naked left breast, 
which was then explained to you. You now enter it on the angle of 
the square, pressing your naked right breast, which is to teach you 
to act upon the square with all mankind, but more especially with 
the brethren.' The Candidate is then conducted twice regularly 
round the Lodge, and halts at the Junior Warden in the South, 
where he gives two raps, and is answered by two, when the same 
questions are asked and answers returned as at the door, from 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 31 

thence he is conducted to the Senior Warden, where the same ques- 
tions are asked and answers returned as before; he is then con- 
ducted to the Master in the East, where the same questions are asked 
and answers returned as before; the Master likewise demands of him 
from whence he came, and whither he was traveling; he answers, 
' From the West, and traveling to the East.' The Master asks him, 
'Why do you leave the West and travel to the East?' Ans. 'In 
search of more light/ The Master then says to the Conductor, 
1 Since this is the case, you will please conduct the Candidate back to 
the West, from whence he came, and put him in care of the Senior 
Warden, who will teach him how to approach the East, "the place 
of light," by advancing upon two upright regular steps to the second 
step [his heel is in the hollow of the right foot on this degree], his 
feet forming the right angle of an oblong square, and his body erect 
at the altar before the Worshipful Master, and place him in a proper 
position to take the solemn oath, or obligation of a Fellow-Craft 
Mason.' The Master then leaves his seat and approaches the kneeling 
Candidate [the Candidate kneels on the right knee, the left forming 
a square, his left arm as far as the elbow in a horizontal position, 
and the rest of the arm in a vertical position, so as to form a square, 
his arm supported by the square held under his elbow], and says, 
' Brother, you are now placed in a proper position to take on you the 
solemn oath, or obligation of Fellow-Craft Masons, which I assure 
you, as before, is neither to affect your religion nor politics: if you 
are willing to take it, repeat your name, and say after me : 

I, A. B. of my own free will and accord, in the presence of Almighty 
God, and this Worshipful Lodge of Fellow-Craft Masons, dedicated 
to God, and held forth to the holy order of St. John, do hereby and 
hereon most solemnly and sincerely promise and swear, in addition 
to my former obligation, that I will not give the degree of a Fellow- 
Craft Mason to any one of the inferior degree, nor to any other 
being in the known world, except it be to a true and lawful brother 
or brethren Fellow-Craft Masons, or within the body of a just and 
lawfully constituted Lodge of such, and not unto him nor unto them 
whom I shall hear so to be, but unto him and them only whom I 
shall find so to be, after strict trial and due examination, or lawful 
information. Furthermore do I promise and swear, that I will not 
wrong this Lodge, nor a brother of this degree, to the value of two 
cents, knowingly, myself, nor suffer it to be done by others if in my 
power to prevent it. Furthermore do I promise and swear, that I 
will support the Constitution of the Grand Lodge of the United 
States, and of the Grand Lodge of this State under which this Lodge 
is held, and conform to all the by-laws, rules, and regulations of this 
or any other Lodge of which I may at any time hereafter become a 
member, as far as in my power. Furthermore do I promise and 
swear, that I will obey all regular signs and summons given, handed, 



32 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

sent, or thrown to me by the hand of a brother Fellow-Craft Mason, 
or from the body of a just and lawfully constituted Lodge, of such, 
provided that it be within the length of my Cable-Tow or square and 
angle of my work. Furthermore do I promise and swear, that I will 
be aiding and assisting all poor and penniless brethren Fellow-Crafts, 
their widows and orphans, wheresoever disposed round the globe, they 
applying to me as such, as far as in my power without injuring my- 
self or family. To all which I do most solemnly and sincerely 
promise and swear, without the least hesitation, mental reservation, 
or self-evasion of mind in me whatever, binding myself under no less 
penalty than to have my left breast torn open, and my heart and 
vitals taken from thence and thrown over my left shoulder and car- 
ried into the valley of Jehoshaphat, there to become a prey to the 
wild beasts of the field and vultures of the air, if ever I should prove 
willfully guilty of violating any part of this my solemn oath, or 
obligation of a Fellow-Craft Mason; so keep me God, and keep me 
steadfast in the due performance of the same.' ' Detach your hands 
and kiss the book, which is the Holy Bible, twice.' The bandage is 
now (by one of the brethren) dropped over the other eye, and the 
Master says, ' Brother [at the same time laying his hand on the top 
of the Candidate's head] what do you most desire ? ' The Candidate 
answers after his prompter, ' More light.' The Master says, ' Brethren, 
form on the square, and assist in bringing our new-made brother from 
darkness to light. " And God said, Let there be light, and there 
was light." ' At this instant all the brethren clap their hands and 
stamp on the floor as in the preceding degree. The Master says to 
the Candidate, ' Brother, what do you discover different from before ? ' 
The Master says, after a short pause, ( You now discover one point 
of the compass elevated above the square, which denotes light in this 
degree; but as one is yet in obscurity, it is to remind you that you 
are yet one material point in the dark, respecting Masonry.' The 
Master steps off from the Candidate three or four steps, and says, 
c Brother, you now discover me as Master of the Lodge, approaching 
you from the East, under the sign and due-guard of a Fellow-Craft 
Mason, do as I do, as near as you can, and keep your position.' The 
sign is given by drawing your right hand flat, with the palm of it 
next to your breast, across your breast from the left to the right 
side with some quickness, and dropping it down by your side; the 
due-guard is given by raising the left arm until that part of it between 
the elbow and shoulder is perfectly horizontal, and raising the rest 
of the arm in a vertical position, so that that part of the arm below 
the elbow, and that part above it, form a square. This is called the 
due-guard of a Fellow-Craft Mason. The two given together, are 
called the sign and due-guard of a Fellow-Craft Mason, and they 
are never given separately ; they would not be recognized by a Mason 
if given separately. The Master, by the time he gives his steps, signs, 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 33 

and due-guard, arrives at the Candidate, and says, ' Brother, I now 
present you with my right hand in token of brotherly love and con- 
fidence, and with it the pass-grip and word of a Fellow-Craft Mason.' 
The pass, or more properly the pass-grip, is given by taking each other 
by the right hand as though going to shake hands, and each putting hie 
thumb between the fore and second fingers where they join the hand, 
and pressing the thumb between the joints. This is the pass-grip of 
a Fellow-Craft Mason, the name of it is Shibboleth. Its origin will 
be explained in the lecture — the pass-grip some give without letter- 
ing or syllabling, and others give it in the same way they do the 
real grip; the real grip of a Fellow-Craft Mason is given by putting 
the thumb on the joint of the second finger where it joins the hand, 
and crooking your thumb so that each can stick the nail of his thumb 
into the joint of the other; this is the real grip of a Fellow-Craft 
Mason; the name of it is Jachin; it is given in the following manner: 
If you wish to examine a person, after having taken each other by 
the grip, ask him, ' What is this ? ' Ans. ' A grip/ Q. ' A grip of 
what?' Ans. 'The grip of a Fellow-Craft Mason/ Q. * Has 
it a name ? Ans. ' It has.' Q. ' Will you give it to me?' Ans. e I 
did not so receive it, neither can I so impart it.' Q. ' What will you 
do with it ? ' Ans. I'll letter it or halve it.' Q. ' Halve it and you 
begin.' Ans. ' No, you begin ! Q. You begin ! Ans. ■ J A.' 
Q. 'CHIN.' Ans. JACHIN.' Q. 'Right, brother Jachin, I greet 
you.' 

As the signs, due-guards, grips, pass-grips, words, pass-words, and 
their several names comprise pretty much all the secrets of Masonry, 
and all the information necessary to pass us as Masons, I intend to 
appropriate a few passages in the latter part of this work, to the 
exclusive purpose of explaining them; I shall not, therefore, spend 
much time in examining them as I progress. After the Master gives 
the Candidate the pass-grip and grip, and their names, he says, 
' Brother, you will rise and salute the Junior and Senior Wardens 
as such, and convince them that you have been regularly passed to the 
degree of a Fellow-Craft Mason, and have got the sign and pass-grip, 
real grip, and their names.' [I do not here express it as expressed in 
Lodges generally : the Master generally says, ' You will arise and 
salute the Wardens, &c. and convince them, &c. that you have got the 
sign, pass-grip and word.' It is obviously wrong, because the first thing 
he gives is the sign, then due-guard, then the pass-grip, real grip, and 
their names.] While the Wardens are examining the Candidate, the 
Master gets an apron and returns to the Candidate and says, ' Brother, 
I now have the honor of presenting you with a lamb-skin or white 
apron as before, which I hope you will continue to wear with honor 
to yourself and satisfaction to the brethren; you will please carry 
it to the Senior Warden in the West, who will teach you how to 
wear it as a Fellow-Craft Mason.' The Senior Warden ties on his 



34 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

apron and turns up one corner of the lower end of the apron and 
tucks it under the apron string. The Senior Deacon then conducts 
his pupil to the Master, who has by this time resumed his seat in 
the East, where he has, or ought to have, the floor carpeted to assist 
him in his explanations. Master to the Candidate, ' Brother, as you 
are dressed, it is necessary you should have tools to work with, I 
will therefore present you with the tools of a Fellow-Craft Masou. 
They are the plumb, square and level. The plumb is an instrument 
made use of by operative Masons to raise perpendiculars; the square, 
to square their work; and the level, to lay horizontals; but we, as 
Free and Accepted Masons, are taught to use them for more noble 
and glorious purposes; the plumb teaches us to walk uprightly in our 
several stations before God and man, squaring our actions by the 
square of virtue, and remembering that we are traveling on the level 
of time to that undiscovered country from whose bourn no traveler 
has returned. I further present you with three precious jewels; 
their names are Faith, Hope, and Charity; they teach us to have 
faith in God, hope in immortality, and charity to all mankind/ 
The Master to the Senior Deacon, ' You will now conduct the Candi- 
date out of the Lodge, and invest him with what he has been divested/ 
After he is clothed, and the necessary arrangements made for his 
reception, such as placing the columns and floor-carpets, if they 
have any, the Candidate is reconducted back to the Lodge; as he 
enters the door the Senior Deacon observes, ' We are now about to 
return to the middle chamber of King Solomon's Temple/ When 
within the door the Senior Deacon proceeds, i Brother, we have 
worked in speculative and operative Masonry, they worked at the 
building of King Solomon's Temple, and many other Masonic edi- 
fices, they wrought six days, they did not work on the seventh, 
because in six days God created the heavens and earth, and rested 
on the seventh day — the seventh, therefore, our ancient brethren 
consecrated as a day of rest, thereby enjoying more frequent oppor- 
tunities to contemplate the glorious works of creation, and to adore 
their great Creator/ Moving a step or two the Senior Deacon pro- 
ceeds, ( Brother, the first thing that attracts our attention are two 
large columns, or pillars, one on the left hand and the other on the 
right; the name of the one on the left hand is Boaz, and denotes 
strength, the name of the one on the right hand is Jachin, and 
denotes establishment; they collectively allude to a passage in Scrip- 
ture, wherein God hath declared in his word, " In strength shall this 
House be established/' These columns are eighteen cubits high, 
twelve in circumference, and four in diameter: they are adorned 
with two large Chapiters, one on each, and these Chapiters are orna- 
mented with net-work, lily-work, and pomegranates, they denote 
unity, peace, and plenty. The net-work, from its connection, denotes 
union; the lily-work, from its whiteness, purity and peace; and the 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 35 

pomegranate, from the exuberance of its seed, denotes plenty. They 
also have two large globes or balls, one on each ; these globes or balls 
contain on their convex surfaces all the maps and charts of the 
celestial and terrestrial bodies; they are said to be thus extensive, 
to denote the universality of Masonry, and that a Mason's charity 
ought to be equally extensive. Their composition is molten, or cast 
brass, they were cast on the banks of the river Jordan, in the clay- 
ground between Succoth and Zaradatha, where King Solomon ordered 
these and all other holy vessels to be cast; they were cast hollow, and 
were four inches or a hand's breadth thick; they were cast hollow 
the better to withstand inundations and conflagrations; were the 
archives of Masonry; and contained the constitution, rolls, and 
records. The Senior Deacon having explained the columns, he passes 
between them, advancing a step or two, observing, as he advances, 
' Brother, we will pursue our travels; the next thing that we come 
to, is a long winding staircase, with three, five, seven steps or more. 
The three first allude to the three principal supports in Masonry, viz : 
wisdom, strength, and beauty; the five steps allude to the five orders 
in architecture, and the five human senses ; the five orders in architec- 
ture, are, the Tuscan, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, and Composite; the 
five human senses, are, hearing, seeing, feeling, smelling and tasting; 
the three first of which, have ever been highly essential among 
Masons ; hearing to hear the word, seeing to see the sign, and feeling 
to feel the grip, whereby one Mason may know another in the dark 
as well as in the light. The seven steps allude to the seven sabbatical 
years, seven years of famine, seven years in building the Temple, 
seven golden candlesticks, seven wonders of the world, seven planets, 
but more especially the seven liberal arts and sciences, which are 
grammar, rhetoric, logic, arithmetic, geometry, masic, and astron- 
omy; for this and many other reasons, the number seven has ever 
been held in high estimation among Masons.' Advancing a few steps, 
the Senior Deacon proceeds : ' Brother, the next thing we come to is- 
the outer door of the middle chamber of King Solomon's Temple, 
which is partly open, but closely tyled by the Junior Warden.' [It is 
the Junior Warden in the South who represents the Tyler at the 
outer door of the middle chamber of King Solomon's Temple], who 
on the approach of the Senior Deacon and Candidate, inquires, ' Who 
comes here, who comes here ? ' The Senior Deacon answers, * A 
Fellow-Craft Mason/ Junior Warden to Senior Deacon, ' How do 
you expect to gain admission? ' A. ' By a pass and token of a pass/ 
Junior Warden to Senior Deacon, * Will you give them to me?' The 
Senior Deacon (or the Candidate, prompted by him) gives them. 
[This and many other tokens or grips, are frequently given by stran- 
gers, when first introduced to each other; if given to a Mason he will 
immediately return it ; they can be given in any company unobserved, 
even by Masons, when shaking hands. A pass and a token of a pass; 



36 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

the pass is the word Shibboleth; the token, alias the pass-grip, is 
given as before described, by taking each other by the right hand as 
if in shaking hands, and placing the thumb between the forefinger 
and second finger at the third joint, or where they join the hand, 
and pressing it hard enough to attract attention. In the lecture it is 
called a token, but generally called the pass-grip; it is an undeniable 
fact that Masons express themselves so differently, when they mean 
the same thing, that they frequently wholly misunderstand each 
other.] 

After the Junior Warden has received the pass Shibboleth, he 
inquires, ' What does it denote ? ■ Ans. ' Plenty.' Junior Warden 
to Senior Deacon, ' Why so?' Ans. ' From an ear of corn being 
placed at the waterford.' Junior Warden to Senior Deacon, { Why 
was this pass instituted? Ans. ' In consequence of a quarrel which 
had long existed between Jeptha, judge of Israel, and the Ephraim- 
ites, the latter of whom had long been a stubborn, rebellious people, 
whom Jeptha had endeavored to subdue by lenient measures, but to 
no effect. The Ephraimites being highly incensed against Jeptha 
for not being called to fight, and share in the rich spoils of the Am- 
monitish war, assembled a mighty army, and passed over the river 
Jordan to give Jeptha battle; but he, being apprised of their ap- 
proach, called together the men of Israel, and gave them battle, and 
put them to flight ; and, to make his victory more complete, he ordered 
guards to be placed at the different passes on the banks of the river 
Jordan, and commanded, if the Ephraimites passed that way, that 
they should pronounce the word Shibboleth; but they, being of a dif- 
ferent tribe, pronounced it Sibboleth, which trifling defect proved them 
spies and cost them their lives : and there fell that day, at the different 
passes on the banks of the river Jordan, forty and two thousand. 
This word was also used by our ancient brethren to distinguish a 
friend from a foe, and has since been adopted as a proper pass-word, 
to be given before entering any well-regulated and governed Lodge 
of Fellow-Craft Masons. ' Since this is the case, you will pass on to 
the Senior Warden in the West, for further examination.' As they 
approach the Senior Warden in the West, the Senior Deacon says 
to the Candidate, ' Brother, the next thing we come to is the inner 
door of the middle chamber of King Solomon's Temple, which we 
find partly open, but more closely tyled by the Senior Warden, when 
the Senior Warden inquires, ' Who comes here ? who comes here ? ' 
The Senior Deacon answers, ' A Fellow-Craft Mason.' Senior Warden 
to Senior Deacon, ' How do you expect to gain admission ? ' Ans. 
' By the grip and word.' The Senior Warden to the Junior Deacon, 
' Will you give them me ? ' They are then given as hereinbefore 
described. The word is Jachin. After they are given, the Senior 
Warden says, ' They are right ; you can pass on to the Worshipful 
Master in the East.' As they approach the Worshipful Master he 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 37 

inquires, ' Who comes here ? Who comes here ? ' Junior Deacon 
answers, ' A Fellow-Craft Mason/ The Master then says to the 
Candidate, ' Brother, you have been admitted into the middle of 
King Solomon's Temple, for the sake of the letter G. It denotes 
Deity, before whom we all ought to bow with reverence, worship and 
adore. It also denotes Geometry, the fifth science, it being that on 
which this degree was principally founded. By Geometry we may 
curiously trace nature through her various windings to her most 
concealed recesses: by it, we discover the power, the wisdom, and 
the goodness of the grand Artificer of the universe, and view with 
delight the proportions which connect this vast machine; by it, we 
may discover how the planets move in their different orbits, and dem- 
onstrate their various revolutions: by it we account for the return 
of seasons, and the variety of scenes which each season displays to 
the discerning eye. Numberless worlds surround us, all formed by 
the same Divine Architect, which roll through this vast expanse, and 
all conducted by the same unerring law of nature. A survey of 
nature, and the observations of her beautiful proportions, first deter- 
mined man to imitate the divine plan, and study symmetry and order. 
The architect began to design; and the plans which he laid down, 
being improved by experience and time, have produced works which 
are the admiration of every age. The lapse of time, the ruthless 
hand of ignorance, and the devastations of war, have laid waste and 
destroyed many valuable monuments of antiquity, on which the 
utmost exertion of human genius has been employed. Even the 
Temple of Solomon, so spacious and magnificent, and constructed by 
so many celebrated artists, escaped not the unsparing ravages of bar- 
barous force. The attentive ear receives the sound from the instruc- 
tive tongue, and the mysteries of Free Masonry are safely lodged in 
the repository of faithful breasts. Tools and implements of archi- 
tecture, and symbolic emblems, most expressive, are selected by the 
fraternity, to imprint on the mind wise and serious truths; and thus, 
through a succession of ages, are transmitted, unimpaired, the most 
excellent tenets of our Institution/ Here ends the work part of 
the Fellow-Craft's degree. It will be observed that the Candidate 
has received, in this place, the second section of the lecture on this 
degree. This course is not generally pursued, but it is much the 
most instructive method, and when it is omitted, I generally conclude 
that it is for want of knowledge of the lecture. Monitorial writers 
(who are by no means coeval with Masonry), all write or copy very 
much after each other, and they have all inserted in their books all 
those clauses of the several lectures which are not considered by the 
wise ones as tending to develop the secrets of Masonry. In some 
instances, they change the phraseology a little; in others, they are 
literal extracts from the lectures. This, it is said, is done to facilitate 
the progress of learners, or young Masons, when in fact, it has the 



38 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

contrary effect. All lecture teachers (and there are many traveling 
about the country, with recommendations from some of their dis- 
tinguished brethren), when they come to any of those clauses, will 
say to their pupils, ' I have not committed that, it is in the Monitor, 
you can learn it at your leisure.' This course of procedure subjects 
the learner to the necessity of making his own questions, and, of 
course, answering monitorially, whether the extracts from the lec- 
tures are literal or not. Again, there is not a perfect sameness in 
all the Monitors, or they could not all get copyrights; hence the 
great diversity in the lectures as well as the work. The following 
charge is, or ought to be, delivered to the Candidate after he has 
got through the ceremonies ; but he is generally told, ' It is in the 
Monitor, and you can read it at your leisure : ' 

' Brother, being advanced to the second degree of Masonry, we 
congratulate you on your preferment. The internal, and not the 
external qualifications of a man, are what Masonry regards. As you 
increase in knowledge, you will improve in social intercourse. 

i It is unnecessary to recapitulate the duties which, as a Mason, 
you are bound to discharge; or enlarge on the necessity of a strict 
adherence to them, as your own experience must have established their 
value. 

' Our laws and regulations you are strenuously to support ; and be 
always ready to assist in seeing them duly executed. You are not to 
palliate or aggravate the offences of your brethren ; but in the decision 
of every trespass against our rules, you are to judge with candor, 
admonish with friendship, and reprehend with justice. 

i The study of the liberal arts, that valuable branch of education, 
which tends so effectually to polish and adorn the mind, is earnestly 
recommended to your consideration; especially the science of Geom- 
etry, which is established as the basis of our art. Geometry, or 
Masonry, originally synonymous terms, being of a divine moral 
nature, is enriched with the most useful knowledge; while it proves 
the wonderful properties of nature, it demonstrates the more im- 
portant truths of morality. 

' Your past behavior and regular deportment have merited the 
honor which we have now conferred; and in your new character it 
is expected that you will conform to the principles of the Order, by 
steadily persevering in the practice of every commendable virtue. 

' Such is the nature of your engagements as a Fellow-Craft, and 
to these duties you are bound by the most sacred ties.' 

I will now proceed with the lecture on this degree. It is divided 
into two sections. 

SECTION FIRST. 

Q. Are you a Fellow-Craft Mason? 
A. I am — try me. 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 39 

Q. By what will you be tried? 

A. By the square. 

Q. Why by the square? 

A. Because it is an emblem of virtue. 

Q. What is a square? 

A. An angle extending to ninety degrees, or the fourth part of a 
circle. 

Q. Where was you prepared to be made a Fellow-Craft Mason? 

A. In a room adjacent to the body of a just and lawfully con- 
stituted Lodge of such, duly assembled in a room or place, repre- 
senting the middle chamber of King Solomon's Temple. 

Q. How was you prepared? 

A. By being divested of all metals ; neither naked or clothed, bare- 
foot nor shod; hoodwinked; with a Cable-Tow twice round my neck; 
in which situation I was conducted to the door of the Lodge, where 
I gave two distinct knocks. 

Q. What did those two distinct knocks allude to? 

A. The second degree in Masonry, it being that on which I was 
about to enter. 

Q. What was said to you from within? 

A. Who comes here? who comes here? 

Q. Your answer? 

A. A worthy brother who has been regularly initiated as an 
Entered Apprentice Mason; served a proper time as such, and now 
wishes for further light in Masonry by being passed to the degree 
of a Fellow-Craft. 

Q. What was then said to you from within? 

A. I was asked if it was of my own free will and accord I made 
this request; if I was duly and truly prepared; worthy and well 
qualified, and had made suitable proficiency in the preceding degree; 
all of which being answered in the affirmative, I was asked, by what 
further rights I expected to obtain so great a benefit. 

Q. Your answer? 

A. By the benefit of a pass-word. 

Q. What is that pass-word? A. Shibboleth. 

Q. What further was said to you from within? 

A. I was bid to wait until the Worshipful Master in the East 
was made acquainted with my request, and his answer returned. 

Q. After his answer was returned, what followed? 

A. I was caused to enter the Lodge. 

Q. How did you enter ? 

A. On the angle of the square presented to my naked right breast 
in the name of the Lord. 

Q. How was you then disposed of? 

A. I was conducted twice regularly round the Lodge, and halted 
at the Junior Warden in the South, where the same questions were 
asked and answers returned as at the door. 



40 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

Q. How did the Junior Warden dispose of you? 

A. He ordered me to be conducted to the Senior Warden in the 
West, where the same questions were asked and answers returned 
as before. 

Q. How did the Senior Warden dispose of you ? 

A. He ordered me to be conducted to the Worshipful Master in the 
East, where the same questions were asked and answers returned as 
before, who likewise demanded of me from whence I came, and 
whither I was traveling. 

Q. Your answer? 

A. From the West, and traveling to the East. 

Q. Why did you leave the West and travel to the East? 

A. In search of more light. 

Q. How did the Worshipful Master then dispose of you? 

A. He ordered me to be conducted back to the West, from whence 
I came, and put in care of the Senior Warden, who taught me how 
to approach the East, by advancing upon two upright, regular steps 
to the second step, my feet forming the right angle of an oblong 
square, and my body erect, at the altar before the Worshipful Master. 

Q. What did the Worshipful Master do with you? 

A. He made a Fellow-Craft Mason of me. 

Q. How? A. In due form. 

Q. What was that due form? 

A. My right knee bare, bent, my left knee forming a square, my 
right band on the Holy Bible, square and compass, my left arn 
forming an angle supported by the square, and my right hand in a 
vertical position, in which posture I took upon me the solemn oath 
or obligation of a Fellow-Craft Mason. [See page 31 for obligation.] 

Q. After your oath or obligation, what was said to you? 

A. I was asked what I most desired. 

Q. Your answer? A. More light. 

Q. On being brought to light, what did you discover different from 
before ? 

A. One point of the compass elevated above the square, which 
denoted light in this degree, but as one point was yet in obscurity, 
it was to remind me that I was yet one material point in the dark 
respecting Masonry. 

Q. What did you next discover? 

A. The Worshipful Master approaching me from the East, under 
the sign and due-guard of a Fellow-Craft Mason, who presented me 
with his right hand in token of brotherly love and confidence, and 
proceeded to give me the pass-grip and word of a Fellow-Craft 
Mason, and bid me rise and salute the Junior and Senior Wardens, 
and convince them that I had been regularly passed to the degree of 
a Fellow-Craft, and had the sign, grip, and word of a Fellow-Craft 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 41 

Q. What did you next discover? 

A. The Worshipful Master approaching me a second time from the 
East, who presented me with a lamb-skin, or white apron, which he 
said he hoped I would continue to wear with honor to myself, and 
satisfaction and advantage to the brethren. 

Q. What was you next presented with? 

A. The working-tools of a Fellow-Craft Mason. 

Q. What are they ? 

A. The Plumb, Square, and Level. 

Q. What did they teach? (I think this question ought to be ' How 
explained? ') 

A. The Plumb is an instrument made use of by operative Masons 
to raise perpendiculars; the Square, to square their work; and the 
Level to lay horizontals; but we, as Free and Accepted Masons, are 
taught to make use of them for more noble and glorious purposes: 
the Plumb admonishes us to walk uprightly in our several stations 
before God and man, squaring our actions by the square of virtue, 
and remembering that we are all traveling upon the level of time to 
that undiscovered country from whose bourn no traveler returns. 

Q. What was you next presented with? 

A. Three precious jewels. 

Q. What were they? A. Faith, Hope, and Charity. 

Q. What do they teach ? 

A. Faith in God, hope in immortality, and charity to all mankind. 

Q. How was you then disposed of? 

A. I was conducted out of the Lodge, and invested of what I had 
been divested. 

SECOND SECTION. 

Q. Have you ever worked as a Fellow-Craft Mason? 

A. I have, in speculative; but our forefathers wrought both in 
speculative and operative Masonry. 

Q. Where did they work? 

A. At the building of King Solomon's Temple, and many other 
Masonic edifices. 

Q. How long did they work? A Six days. 

Q. Did they not work on the seventh? 

A. They did not. 

Q. Why so? 

A. Because in six days God created the Heavens and the Earth, 
and rested on the seventh day ; the seventh day, therefore, our ancient 
brethren consecrated as a day of rest from their labors; thereby 
enjoying more frequent opportunities to contemplate the glorious 
works of creation, and adore their great Creator. 

Q. Did you ever return to the sanctum sanctorum, or holy of holies 
of King Solomon's Temple? 



42 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

A. I did. Q. By what way? 

A. Through a long porch or alley. 

Q. Did anything particular strike your attention on your return? 

A. There did, viz. : two large columns, or pillars, one on the left 
hand and the other on the right. 

Q. What was the name of the one on your left hand? 

A. Boaz, to denote strength. 

Q. What was the name of the one on your right hand ? 

A. Jachin, denoting establishment. 

Q. What do they collectively allude to? 

A. A passage in Scripture wherein God has declared in his word, 
' In strength shall this House be established.' 

Q. What were their dimensions? 

A. Eighteen cubits in height, twelve in circumference, and four in 
diameter. 

Q. Were they adorned with anything? 

A. They were, with two large Chapiters, one on each. 

Q. Were they ornamented with anything? 

A. They were, with wreaths of net-work, lily-work and pome- 
granates. 

Q. What do they denote? 

A. Unity, peace and plenty. Q. Why so? 

A. Net-work, from its connection, denotes union; lily-work from 
its whiteness and purity, denotes peace; and the pomegranate, from 
the exuberance of its seed, denotes plenty. 

Q. Were those columns adorned with anything further? 

A. They were, viz: two large globes or balls, one on each. 

Q. Did they contain anything? 

A. They did, viz. : all the maps and charts of the celestial and ter- 
restial bodies. 

Q. Why are they said to be so extensive? 

A. To denote the universality of Masonry, and that a Mason's 
charity ought to be equally extensive. 

Q. What was their composition? 

A. Molten, or cast brass. Q. Who cast them? 

A. Our Grand Master, Hiram Abiff. 

Q. Where were they cast? 

A. On the banks of the river Jordan, in the clay-ground between 
Succoth and Zaradatha, where King Solomon ordered these and all 
other holy vessels to be cast. 

Q. Were they cast sound, or hollow? A. Hollow. 

Q. What was their thickness? 

A. Four inches, or a hand's-breadth. 

Q. Why were they cast hollow? 

A. The better to withstand inundations and conflagrations; were 
the archives of Masonry, and contained the constitution, rolls and 
records. 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 43 

Q. What did you next come to? 

A. A long winding staircase, with three, five, seven steps or more. 

Q. What do the three steps allude to? 

A. The three principal supports in Masonry, viz. : wisdom, strength 
and beauty. 

Q. What do the five steps allude to? 

A. The five orders in architecture, and the five human senses. 

Q. What are the five orders in architecture? 

A. The Tuscan, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, and Composite. 

Q. What are the five human senses ? 

A. Hearing, seeing, feeling, smelling, and tasting; the first three 
of which have ever been deemed highly essential among Masons; 
hearing, to hear the word; seeing, to see the sign; and feeling, to 
feel the grip whereby one Mason may know another in the dark, as 
well as in the light. 

Q. What do the seven steps allude to? 

A. The seven sabbatical years, seven years of famine, seven years 
in building the Temple, seven golden candlesticks, seven wonders of 
the world, seven planets; but more especially the seven liberal arts 
and sciences, which are grammar, rhetoric, logic, arithmetic, geom- 
etry, music, and astronomy. For these, and many other reasons, 
the number seven has ever been held in high estimation among 
Masons. 

Q. What did you next come to? 

A. The outer door of the middle chamber of King Solomon's 
Temple, which I found partly open, but closely tyled by the Junio? 
Warden. 

Q. How did you gain admission? 

A. By a pass, and token of a pass. 

Q. What was the name of the pass? A. Shibboleth. 

Q. What does it denote? A. Plenty. Q. Why so? 

A. From an ear of corn being placed at the water-ford. 

Q. Why was this pass instituted? 

A. In consequence of a quarrel which had long existed between 
Jeptha, Judge of Israel, and the Ephraimites; the latter of whom 
had long been a stubborn, rebellious people, whom Jeptha had en- 
deavored to subdue by lenient measures; but to no effect. The 
Ephraimites being highly incensed against Jeptha, for not being 
called to fight and share in the rich spoils of the Ammonitish war, 
assembled a mighty army, and passed over the river Jordan to give 
Jeptha battle; but he, being apprised of their approach, called to- 
gether the men of Israel, and gave them battle, and put them to 
flight; and to make his victory more complete, he ordered guards to 
be placed at the different passes on the banks of the river Jordan, 
and commanded, if the Ephraimites passed that way that they should 
pronounce the word Shibboleth; but they being of a different 



44 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

tribe pronounced it Siboleth; which trifling defect proved them spies, 
and cost them their lives; and there fell that day at the different 
passes on the banks of the river Jordan, forty and two thousand. 
This word was also used by our ancient brethren to distinguish a 
friend from a foe, and has since been adopted as a proper pass-word 
to be given before entering any well regulated and governed Lodge 
of Fellow-Craft Masons. 

Q. What did you next come to? 

A. The inner door of the middle chamber of King Solomon's, 
Temple, which I found partly open, but closely tyled by the Senior 
Warden. 

Q. How did you gain admittance? 

A. By the grip and word. 

Q. How did the Senior Warden dispose of you ? 

A. He ordered me to be conducted to the Worshipful Master in the 
East, who informed me that I had been admitted into the middle 
chamber of King Solomon's Temple for the sake of the letter G. 

Q. Does it denote anything ? 

A. It does : Deity, before whom we should all bow with reverence, 
worship and adore. It also denotes Geometry, the fifth science; it 
being that on which this degree was principally founded. 

Thus ends the second degree of Masonry. 



THE THIRD, OR MASTER-MASON'S DEGREE. 

The traditional account of the death, several burials, and resurrec- 
tion of Hiram Abiff, the widow's son [as hereafter narrated] , admitted 
as facts, this degree is certainly very interesting. The Bible informs 
us, that there was a person of that name employed at the building 
of King Solomon's Temple; but neither the Bible, the writings of 
Josephus, nor any other writings, however ancient, of which I have 
any knowledge, furnish any information respecting his death. It 
certainly is very singular, that a man so celebrated as Hiram Abiff, 
who was an arbiter between Solomon, King of Israel, and Hiram, 
King of Tyre, universally acknowledged as the third most distin- 
guished man then living, and in many respects the greatest man in 
the world, should pass off the stage of action in the presence of King 
Solomon, three thousand three hundred grand overseers, and one 
hundred and fifty thousand workmen, with whom he had spent a 
number of years, and neither King Solomon, his bosom friend, nor 
any other among his numerous friends ever recorded his death or 
anything about him. I make these remarks now, hoping that they 
may induce some person who has time and capacity to investigate the 
subject, and promulgate the result of their investigations. I shall let 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 45 

the subject rest where it is at present ; it is not intended that it should 
form any part of this little volume. The principal object of this 
work is to lay before the world a true history of Free Masonry, without 
saying anything for or against it. 

A person who has received the two preceding degrees, and wishes to 
be raised to the sublime degree of a Master-Mason, is then [the Lodge 
being opened as in the preceding degrees] conducted from the prepar- 
ation room to the door [the manner of preparing him is particularly 
explained in the lecture], where he gives three distinct knocks, when 
the Senior Warden rises and says, ' Worshipful, while we are peace- 
ably at work on the third degree of Masonry, under the influence of 
Humanity, Brotherly Love, and Affection, the door of our Lodge 
appears to be alarmed.' The Master to the Junior Deacon, ' Brother 
Junior, inquire the cause of that alarm/ The Senior Deacon then 
steps to the door, and answers the three knocks that had been given, 
by three more [these knocks are much louder than those given on any 
occasion, other than that of the admission of Candidates in the several 
degrees] ; one knock is then given without and answered by one from 
within, when the door is partly opened, and the Junior asks, ' Who 
comes there ? who comes there ? who comes there ? ' The Senior 
Deacon answers, ' A worthy brother, who has been regularly initiated 
as an Entered Apprentice Mason, passed to the degree of a Fellow- 
Craft, and now wishes for further light in Masonry, by being raised 
to the sublime degree of a Master-Mason.' Junior Deacon to Senior 
Deacon, i Is it of his own free will and accord he makes this request ? ' 
Ans. c It is/ Junior Deacon to Senior Deacon, ' Is he duly and truly 
prepared?' Ans. ' He is.' Junior Deacon to Senior Deacon, ' Is he 
worthy and well qualified?' Ans. ' He is.' Junior Deacon to Senior 
Deacon, ' Has he made suitable proficiency in the preceding degrees ? ' 
Ans. i He has.' Junior Deacon to Senior Deacon, ' By what further 
rights does he expect to obtain this benefit?' Ans. i By the benefit 
of a pass-word.' Junior Deacon to Senior Deacon, ' Has lie a pass- 
word?' Ans. ' He has not, but I have got it for him.' The Junior 
Deacon to Senior Deacon, l Will you give it to me ? ' The Senior 
Deacon then whispers in the ear of the Junior Deacon, ' Tubal Cain. 9 
Junior Deacon says, * The pass is right. Since this is the case you 
will wait until the Worshipful Master be made acquainted with his 
request and his answer returned.' The Junior Deacon then repairs 
to the Master and gives three knocks at the door; after answering 
which, the same questions are asked and answers returned, as at the 
door, when the Master says, ' Since he comes indued with all these 
necessary qualifications, let him enter this Worshipful Lodge in the 
name of the Lord, and take heed on what he enters.' The Junior 
Deacon returns to the door and says, ( Let him enter this Worshipful 
Lodge in the name of the Lord, and take heed on what he enters/ 
In entering, both points of the compass are pressed against his naked 



46 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

right and left breasts, when the Junior Deacon stops the Candidate 
and says, * Brother, when you first entered this Lodge, you was 
received on the point of the compass pressing your naked left breast, 
which was then explained to you ; when you entered it the second time, 
you was received on the angle of the square, which was also explained 
to you ; on entering it now, you are received on the two extreme points 
of the compass pressing your naked right and left breasts, which are 
thus explained: As the most vital parts of man are contained between 
the two breasts, so are the most valuable tenets of Masonry contained 
between the two extreme points of the compass, which are Virtue, 
Morality, and Brotherly Love/ The Senior Deacon then conducts 
the Candidate three times regularly round the Lodge. [I wish the 
reader to observe, that on this, as well as every other degree, that the 
Junior Warden is the first of the three principal officers that the Can- 
didate passes, traveling with the sun when he starts round the Lodge, 
and that as he passes the Junior Warden, Senior Warden, and Master, 
the first time going round, they each give one rap; the second time, 
two raps; and the third time, three raps each. The number of raps 
given on these occasions are the same as the number of the degree, 
except the first degree, on which three are given, I always thought 
improperly.] During the time the Candidate is traveling round the 
room, the Master reads the following passage of Scripture, the Con- 
ductor and Candidate traveling, and the Master reading, so that the 
traveling and reading terminate at the same time : ' Remember now 
thy Creator in the days of thy youth, while the evil days come not, 
nor the years draw nigh, when thou shalt say, I have no pleasure in 
them; while the sun, or the light, or the moon, or the stars, be not 
darkened, nor the clouds return after rain: in the day when the 
keepers of the house shall tremble, and the strong men shall bow 
themselves, and the grinders cease because they are few, and those 
that look out of the windows be darkened, and the doors shall be shut 
in the streets, when the sound of the grinding is low, and he shall 
rise up at the voice of the bird, and all the daughters of music shall 
be brought low. Also, when they shall be afraid of that which is 
high, and fears shall be in the way, and the almond tree shall flourish, 
and the grasshopper shall be a burden, and desire shall fail: because 
man goeth to his long home, and the mourners go about the streets; 
or ever the silver cord be loosed, or the golden bowl be broken, or the 
pitcher be broken at the fountain, or the wheel at the cistern. Then 
shall the dust return to the earth as it was; and the spirit return 
unto God who gave it/ The Conductor and Candidate halt at the 
Junior Warden in the South, where the same questions are asked and 
answers returned as at the door; he is then conducted to the Senior 
Warden in the West, where the same questions are asked and answers 
returned as before; from thence he is conducted to the W. Master in 
the East, who asks the same questions and receives the same answers 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 47 

as before, and who likewise asks the Candidate from whence he came, 
and whither he is traveling. Ans. * From the West, and traveling to 
the East.' Q. ' Why do you leave the West, and travel to the East? ' 
Ans. ■ In search of more light/ The Master then^says to the Senior 
Deacon, ' You will please conduct the Candidate back to the West, 
from whence he came, and put him in care of the Senior Warden, 
and request him to teach the Candidate how to approach the East by 
advancing upon three upright regular steps to the third step, his feet 
forming a square, his body erect at the altar, before the Worshipful 
Master, and place him in a proper position to take upon him the 
solemn oath or obligation of a Master-Mason.' The Master then 
comes to the Candidate and says, ( Brother, you are now placed In a 
proper position [the lecture explains it] to take upon you the solemn 
oath or obligation of a Master-Mason, which I assure you, as before, 
is neither to affect your religion nor politics. If you are willing to 
take it, repeat your name, and say after me: 

' I, A. B., of my own free will and accord, in presence of Almighty 
God, and this Worshipful Lodge of Master-Masons, erected to God, 
and dedicated to the holy Order of St. John, do hereby and hereon 
most solemnly and sincerely promise and swear, in addition to my 
former obligations, that I will not give the degree of Master-Mason, 
to any one of an inferior degree, nor to any other being in the known 
world, except it be to a true and lawful brother or brethren Master- 
Masons, or within the body of a just and lawfully constituted Lodge 
of such; and not unto him, nor unto them, whom I shall hear so to 
be, but unto him and them only whom I shall find so to be after 
strict trial and due examination, or lawful information received, 
Furthermore, do I promise and swear, that I will not give the Mas^ 
ter's word, which I shall hereafter receive, neither in the Lodge noi 
out of it; except it be on the five points of fellowship, and then not 
above my breath. Furthermore, do I promise and swear, that I will 
not give the grand hailing sign of distress, except I am in real dis- 
tress, or for the benefit of the Craft when at work ; and should I ever 
see that sign given or the word accompanying it, and the person who 
gave it, appearing to be in distress, I will fly to his relief, at the risk 
of my life, should there be a greater probability of saving his life, 
than losing my own. Furthermore, do I promise and :»we&r, that I 
will not wrong this Lodge, nor a brother of this degree, to the value 
of one cent, knowingly, myself, nor suffer it to be done by others 
if in my power to prevent it. Furthermore, do I promise and swear, 
that I will not be at the initiating, passing, ?;a^ raising a Candidate 
at one communication, without a regukr dispensation from the 
Grand Lodge for the same. Furthermore', do I promise and swear, 
that I will not be at the initiating, pas&ing, or raising a Candidate in 
a clandestine Lodge, I knowing it to be such. Furthermore, do I 
promise and swear, that I will not be at the initiating of an old man 



48 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

in dotage, a young man in non-age, an Atheist, irreligious, libertine, 
idiot, madman, hermaphrodite, nor woman. Furthermore, do I 
promise and swear, that I will not speak evil of a brother Master- 
Mason, neither behind his back nor before his face, but will apprise 
him of all approaching danger, if in my power. Furthermore, do I 
promise and swear, that I will not violate the chastity of a Master 
Mason's wife, mother, sister, or daughter, I knowing them to be such, 
nor suffer it to be done by others, if in my power to prevent it. Fur- 
thermore, do I promise and swear, that I will support the Constitution 

of the Grand Lodge of the state of under which this Lodge 

is held, and conform to all the by-laws, rules and regulations of this, 
or any other Lodge of which I may at any time hereafter become a 
member. Furthermore, do I promise and swear, that I will obey all 
regular signs, summons or tokens, given, handed, sent, or thrown to 
me from the hand of a brother Master Mason, or from the body of a 
just and lawfully constituted Lodge of such, provided it be within the 
length of my Cable-Tow. Furthermore, do I promise and swear, that 
a Master-Mason's secrets, given to me in charge as such, and I know- 
ing him to be such, shall remain as secure and inviolable in my 
breast, as in his own, when communicated to me, murder and treason 
excepted; and they left to my own election. Furthermore, do I 
promise and swear, that I will go on a Master-Mason's errand when- 
ever required, even should I have to go barefoot and barehead, if 
within the length of my Cable-Tow. Furthermore, do I promise and 
swear, that I will always remember a brother Master-Mason, when 
on my knees offering up devotions to Almighty God. Furthermore, 
do I promise and swear, that I will be aiding and assisting all poor, 
indigent Master-Masons, their wives and orphans, wheresoever dis- 
posed round the globe ; as far as in my power, without injuring myself 
or family materially. Furthermore, do I promise and swear, that if 
any part of this solemn oath or obligation be omitted at this time, 
that I will hold myself amenable thereto whenever informed. To 
all which I do most solemnly and sincerely promise and swear, with 
a fixed and steady purpose of mind in me, to keep and perform the 
same, binding myself under no less penalty, than to have my body 
severed in two in the midst, and divided to the North and South, my 
bowels burned to ashes in the center, and the ashes scattered before 
the four winds of heaven, that there might not the least track or trace 
of remembrance remain among men or Masons of so vile and perjured 
a wretch as I should be, were I ever to prove willfully guilty of vio- 
lating any part of this my solemn oath or obligation of a Master- 
Mason. So help me God, and keep me steadfast, in the due perform- 
ance of the same.' The Master then asks the Candidate, ' What do 
you most desire ? ' The Candidate answers after his prompter, ' More 
light.' The bandage which was tied round his head in the prepara- 
tion room is, by one of the brethren who stand behind him, for that 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 49 

purpose, loosened and put over both eyes, and he is immediately 
brought to light in the same manner as in the preceding degree, ex- 
cept three stamps on the floor, and three claps of the hands are given 
in this degree. On being brought to light the Master says to the 
Candidate, ' You first discover, as before, three great lights, in Ma- 
sonry by the assistance of three lesser, with this difference; both 
points of the compass are elevated above the square, which denotes 
to you, that you are about to receive all the light that can be con- 
ferred on you in a Master's Lodge/ The Master steps back from the 
Candidate and says, e Brother, you now discover me, as Master of this 
Lodge, approaching you from the East, under the sign and due-guard 
of a Master-Mason. The sign is given by raising both hands and 
arms to the elbows perpendicularly, one on either side of the head, the 
elbows forming a square. The words accompanying the sign in case 
of distress, are, " Lord my God, is there no help for the widow's 
son." As the last words drop from your lips you let your hands 
fall in that manner best calculated to indicate solemnity.' King 
Solomon is said to have made this exclamation on the receipt of the 
information of the death of Hiram Abbiff. Masons are all charged 
never to give the words, except in the dark, when the sign cannot be 
seen. Here Masons differ very much; some contend that Solomon 
gave this sign, and made this exclamation when informed of Hiram's 
death, and work accordingly in their Lodges. Others say the sign 
was given and the exclamation made at the grave, when Solomon 
went there to raise Hiram, and of course they work accordingly ; that 
is to say, the Master who governs a Lodge holding the latter opinion, 
gives the sign, &c, at the grave, when he goes to raise the body, and 
vice versa. The due-guard is given by putting the right hand to the 
left side of the bowels, the hand open with the thumb next to the 
belly, and drawing it across the belly, and letting it fall ; this is done 
tolerably quick. After the Master has given the sign and due-guard, 
which do not take more than a minute, he says, ' Brother, I now 
present you with my right hand in token of brotherly love and affec- 
tion, and with it the pass-grip and word.' The pass-grip is given by 
pressing the thumb between the joints of the second and third ringers 
where they join the hand; the word or name is Tubal Cain. It is 
the pass-word to the Master's degree. The Master, after giving the 
Candidate the pass-grip and word, bids him rise and salute the Junior 
and Senior Wardens, and convince them that he is an obligated 
Master-Mason, and is in possession of the pass-grip and word. While 
the Wardens are examining the Candidate, the Master returns to the 
East and gets an apron, and as he returns to the Candidate, one of 
the Wardens, sometimes both, says to the Master, ' We are satisfied 

that Br. is an obligated Master-Mason.' The Master "then says 

to the Candidate, ' Brother, I now have the honor to present you with 
a lamb-skin or white apron, as before, which I hope you will continue 



50 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

to wear with credit to yourself, and satisfaction and advantage to the 
brethren ; you will please carry it to the Senior Warden in the West, 
who will teach you how to wear it as a Master-Mason.' 

The Senior Warden ties on the apron, and lets the flap fall down 
before in its natural and common situation. 

The Master returns to his seat and the Candidate is conducted to 
him. Master to Candidate, ' Brother, I perceive you are dressed, it 
is of course necessary you should have tools to work with. I will now 
present you with the working tools of a Master-Mason, and explain 
their use to you. The trowel is an instrument made use of by oper- 
ative Masons to spread the cement which unites a building into one 
common mass; but we, as free and accepted Masons, are taught to 
make use of it for the more noble and glorious purpose of spreading 
the cement of brotherly love and affection; that cement which unites 
us into one sacred band or society of friends and brothers, among 
whom no contention should ever exist, but that noble contention or 
rather emulation of who can best work or best agree. I also present 
you with three precious jewels; their names are humanity, friendship, 
and brotherly love. 

' Brother, you are not yet invested with all the secrets of this degree, 
nor do I know whether you ever' will until I know how you withstand 
the amazing trials and dangers that await you. 

'You are now about to travel to give us a specimen of your forti- 
tude, perseverance, and fidelity in the preservation of what you have 
already received. Fare you well, and may the Lord be with you, and 
support you through all your trials and difficulties.' [In some 
Lodges they make him pray before he starts.] The Candidate is 
then conducted out of the Lodge, clothed, and returns; as he enters 
the door, his conductor says to him, ' Brother, we are now in a place 
representing the sanctum sanctorum or holy of holies of King Solo- 
mon's Temple.' It was the custom of our Grand Master, Hiram 
Abbiff, every day at high twelve, when the Craft were from labor to 
refreshment, to enter into the sanctum sanctorum, and offer up his 
devotions to the ever-living God. Let us, in imitation of him, kneel 
and pray.' They then kneel, and the Conductor says the following 
prayer: ■ Thou, God, knowest our downsitting and uprising and 
understandest our thoughts afar off. Shield and defend us from the 
evil intentions of our enemies, and support us under the trials and 
afflictions we are destined to endure while traveling through this vale 
of tears. Man that is born of a woman, is of few days and full of 
trouble. He cometh forth as a flower, and is cut down; he fleeth 
also as a shadow, and continueth not. Seeing his days are deter- 
mined, the number of his months are with thee, thou hast appointed 
his bounds, that he cannot pass; turn from him, that he may rest, 
until he shall accomplish his day. For there is hope of a tree, if it be 
cut down, that it will sprout again, and that the tender branch thereof 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 51 

will not cease. But man dieth and wasteth away; yea, man giveth 
up the ghost, and where is he ? As the waters fail from the sea, and 
• the flood decayeth and drieth up, so man lieth down, and riseth not 
up until the heavens shall be no more. Yet, Lord! have compas- 
sion on the children of thy creation; administer unto them comfort 
in time of trouble, and save them with an everlasting salvation. 
Amen. So mote it be/ They then rise, and the Conductor says to 
the Candidate, ' Brother, in further imitation of our Grand Master 
Hiram Abbiff, let us retire at the South gate.' They then advance 
to the Junior Warden [who represents Jubela, one of the ruffians], 
who exclaims, ' Who comes here ? ' [The room is dark or the Candi- 
date hoodwinked.] The Conductor answers, ' Our Grand Master, 
Hiram Abbiff/ ' Our Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff!' exclaims the 
ruffian, ' he is the very man I wanted to see/ Seizing the Candidate 
by the throat at the same time, and jerking him about with violence, 
' Give me the Master-Mason's word, or I'll take your life/ The Con- 
ductor replies, i I cannot give it now, but if you will wait until the 
Grand Lodge assembles at Jerusalem, if you are found worthy, you 
shall then receive it, otherwise you cannot/ The ruffian then gives 
the Candidate a blow with the twenty-four inch gauge across the 
throat, on which he fled to the West gate ; where he was accosted by 
the second ruffian, Jubelo, with more violence, and on his refusal to 
comply with his request, he gave him a severe blow with the square 
across his breast; on which he attempted to make his escape at the 
East gate, where he was accosted by the third ruffian, Jubelum, with 
still more violence, and on refusing to comply with his request, the 
ruffian gave him a violent blow with the common gavel, on the fore- 
head, which brought him to the floor; on which one of them ex- 
claimed, ' What shall we do ? we have killed our Grand Master, Hiram 
Abbiff ! another answers, l Let's carry him out at the East gate and 
bury him in the rubbish until low twelve, and then meet and carry 
him a Westerly course and bury him/ The Candidate is then 
taken up in a blanket, on which he fell, and carried to the West end 
of the Lodge, and covered up and left; by this time the Master has 
resumed his seat (King Solomon is supposed to arrive at the Temple 
at this juncture), and calls to order, and asks the Senior Warden 
the cause of all that confusion ; the Senior Warden answers, ' Our 
Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff, is missing, and there are no plans or 
designs laid down on the Trestle-board, for the Crafts to pursue their 
labors/ The Master, alias King Solomon, replies, ' Our Grand Mas- 
ter missing? Our Grand Master has always been very punctual in 
his attendance; I fear he is indisposed; assemble the Crafts and 
search in and about the Temple, and see if he can be found/ They 
all shuffle about the floor awhile, when the Master calls them to order, 
and asks the Senior Warden, ' What success ? ' He answers, ' We 
cannot find our Grand Master, my lord/ The Master then orders 



52 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

the Secretary to call the roll of workmen, and see whether any of 
them are missing. The Secretary calls the roll, and says, ( I have 
called the roll, my lord, and find that there are three missing, viz: 
Jubela, Jubelo and Jubelum.' His lordship then observes, ' This 
brings to my mind a circumstance that took place this morning; 
twelve Fellow-C»afts, clothed in white gloves and aprons, in token 
of their innocence, came to me and confessed that they twelve, with 
three others, had conspired to extort the Master-Mason's word from 
their Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff; and in case of refusal, to take his 
life — they twelve had recanted, but feared the other three had been 
base enough to carry their atrocious designs into execution.' Solomon 
then ordered twelve Fellow-Crafts to be drawn from the bands of the 
workmen, clothed in white gloves and aprons, in token of their inno- 
cence, and sent three East, three West, three North and three South, 
in search of the ruffians, and if found, to bring them forward. Here 
the members all shuffle about the floor awhile, and fall in with a 
reputed traveler, and inquire of him if he had seen any traveling men 
that way ; he tells them that he had seen three that morning near the 
coast of Joppa, who from their dress and appearance were Jews, and 
were workmen from the Temple, inquiring for a passage to Ethiopia, 
but were unable to obtain one in consequence of an embargo which 
had recently been laid on all the shipping, and had turned back into 
the country. 

The Master now calls them to order again, and asks the Senior 
Warden, e What success ? ' He answers by relating what had taken 
place. Solomon observes, i I had this embargo laid to prevent the 
ruffians from making their escape,' and adds, ' you will go and search 
again, and search until you find them, if possible, and if they are not 
found, the twelve who confessed, shall be considered as the reputed 
murderers, and suffer accordingly.' The members all start again and 
shuffle about awhile, until one of them, as if by accident, finds the 
body of Hiram Abbiff, alias the Candidate, and hails his traveling 
companions, who join him, and while they are humming out some- 
thing over the Candidate, the three reputed ruffians, who are seated 
in a private corner near the Candidate are heard to exclaim in the 
following manner: first, Jubela, '0\ that my throat had been cut 
across, my tongue torn out, and my body buried in the rough sands of 
the sea at low watermark, where the tide ebbs and flows twice every 
twenty-four hours, ere I had ever been accessory to the death of so 
good a man as our Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff.' 

The second, Jubelo, ( ! that my left breast had been torn open, 
and my heart and vitals taken from thence and thrown over my left 
shoulder, carried into the valley of Jehosaphat, and there become a 
prey to the wild beasts of the field and vultures of the air, ere I had 
conspired the death of so good a man as our Grand Master, Hiram 
Abbiff.' 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 53 

The third, Jubelum, ' ! that my body had been severed in two in 
the midst, and divided to the North and the South, my bowels burned 
to ashes in the center, and the ashes scattered by the four winds of 
heaven, that there might not the least track or trace of remembrance 
remain among men or Masons, of so vile and perjured a wretch as I 
am. Ah, Jubela and Jubelo, it was I that struck him harder than 
you both ; it was I that gave him the fatal blow ; it was I that killed 
him outright.' The three Fellow-Crafts, who had stood by the Candi- 
date all this time listening to the ruffians, whose voices they recog- 
nized, say one to the other. { What shall we do ? there are three of 
them, and only three of us?' ' It is/ said one in reply, f our cause 
is good, let us seize them ; ' on which they rush forward, seize and 
carry them to the Master, to whom they relate what had passed; the 
Master then addresses them in the following [they in many Lodges 
kneel, or lie down in token of their guilt and penitence.] Well, 
Jubela, what have you got to say for yourself, guilty or not guilty ? ' 
Ans. ' Guilty, my lord/ ' Jubelo, guilty or not guilty?' Ans. 
6 Guilty, my lord.' ' Jubelum, guilty or not guilty?' Ans. i Guilty, 
my lord.' The Master to the three Fellow-Crafts who took them: 
1 Take them without the west gate of the Temple and have them 
executed according to the several imprecations of their own mouths.' 
They are then hurried off to the west end of the room. Here this 
part of the farce ends. The Master then orders fifteen Fellow-Crafts 
to be selected from the bands of the workmen, and send three East, 
three West, three North, three South, and three in and about the 
Temple in search of their Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff (in some 
Lodges they only send twelve, where their own lectures say fifteen 
were sent) and charges them if they find the body to examine care- 
fully on and about it for the Master's word, or a key to it. The 
three that traveled a westerly course, come to the Candidate and finger 
about him a little and are called to order by the Master, when they 
report that they had found the grave of their Grand Master, Hiram 
Abbiff, and on moving the earth until they came to the body, they 
involuntarily found their hands raised in this position (showing it at 
the same time; it is the due-guard of this degree) to guard their 
nostrils against the offensive effluvia which arose from the grave, and 
that they had searched carefully on and about the body for the Mas- 
ter's word, but had not discovered anything but a faint resemblance 
of the letter G on the left breast. The Master on the receipt of this 
information (raising himself), raises his hands three several times 
above his head, [as hereinbefore described], and exclaims, ' Nothing 
but a faint resemblance of the letter G ! that is not the Master's word, 
nor a key to it. I fear the Master's word is forever lost ! Nothing 
but the faint resemblance of the letter G ! that is not the Masters 
word, nor a key to it. I fear the Master's word is forever lost ! [The 
third exclamation is different from the other two — attend to it, it h^i 



54 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

been described in page 49], 'Nothing but a faint resemblance of the 
letter G ! that is not the Master's word, nor a key to it. Lord, my 
God, is there no help for the widow's son ! ' The Master then orders 
the Junior Wardens to summon a Lodge of Entered Apprentice 
Masons, and repair to the grave and try to raise the body of their 
Grand Master by the Entered Apprentice's grip. They go to the 
Candidate and take hold of his fore-finger and pull it, return and 
tell the Master that they could not raise him by the Entered Appren- 
tice's grip, that the skin cleaved from the bone. A Lodge of Fellow- 
Crafts are then sent, who act as before, except they pull the candi- 
date's second finger. The Master then directs the Senior Warden 
[generally] to summon a Lodge of Master-Masons, and says, ' I will 
go with them myself in person, and try to raise the body by the Mas- 
ter's grip, or lion's paw.' [Some say by the strong grip or lion's 
paw.] They then all assemble round the Candidate, the Master 
having declared that the first word spoken after the body was raised 
should be adopted as a substitute for the Master's word, for the 
government of Master-Mason's Lodges in all future generations; he 
proceeds to raise the Candidate, alias the representative of the dead 
body of Hiram Abbiff. He [the Candidate], is raised on what is 
called the five points of fellowship, which are foot to foot, knee to 
knee, breast to breast, hand to back and mouth to ear. This is done 
by putting the inside of your right foot to the inside of the right foot 
of the person to whom you are going to give the word, the inside of 
your knee to his, laying your right breast against his, your left hands 
on the back of each other, and your mouths to each other's right ear 
[in which position alone you are permitted to give the word], and 
whisper the word Mah-hah-bone. The Master's grip is given by taking 
hold of each other's right hand as though you were going to shake 
hands, and sticking the nails of each of your fingers into the joint of 
the other's wrist where it unites with the hand. In this position the 
Candidate is raised, he keeping his whole body stiff, as though dead. 
The Master in raising him is assisted by some of the brethren, who 
take hold of the Candidate by the arms and shoulders; as soon as he 
is raised to his feet, they step back, and the Master whispers the word 
Mah-hah-bone in his ear and causes the Candidate to repeat it, telling 
him at the same time that he must never give it in any mnner other 
than that which he receives it. He is also told that Mah-hah-bone 
signifies marrow in the bone. They then separate, and the master 
makes the following explanation respecting the five points of fellow- 
ship. Master to Candidate, ' Brother, foot to foot, teaches you that 
you should, whenever asked, go on a brother's errand if within the 
length of your Cable-Tow, even if you should have to go barefoot and 
barehead. Knee to knee, that you should always remember a Master- 
Mason in your devotion to Almighty God. Breast to breast, that you 
should keep the Master-Mason's secrets, when given to you in charge 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 55 

as such, as secure and inviolable in your breast, as they were in his 
own before communicated to you. Hand to back, that you should 
support a Master-Mason behind his back as well as before his face. 
Mouch to ear, that you should support his good name as well behind 
his back as before his face.' After the Candidate is through what 
is called the work part, the Master addresses him in the following 
manner : ' Brother, you may suppose from the manner you have been 
dealt with to-night, that we have been fooling with you, or that we 
have treated you differently from others, but I assure you that is not 
the case. You have this night represented one of the greatest men 
that ever lived, in the tragical catastrophe of his death, burial and 
resurrection ; I mean Hiram Abbiff, the widow's son, who was slain 
by three ruffians at the building of King Solomon's Temple, and who, 
in his inflexibility, integrity, and fortitude, never was surpassed by 
man. The history of that momentous event is thus related. Masonic 
tradition informs us that at the building of King Solomon's Temple, 
fifteen Fellow-Crafts discovered that the Temple was almost finished, 
and not having the Master-Mason's word, became very impatient, and 
entered into a horrid conspiracy to extort the Master-Mason's word 
from their Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff, the first time they met him 
alone, or take his life, that they might pass as Masters in other 
countries and receive wages as such, but before they could accomplish 
their designs, twelve of them recanted, but the other three were base 
enough to carry their atrocious designs into execution. Their names 
were Jubela, Jubelo and Jubelum. 

It was the custom of our Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff, every day at 
high twelve, when the Crafts were from labor to refreshment, to enter 
into the sanctum sanctorum and offer up his devotions to the ever- 
living God, and draw out his plans and designs on his Trestle-board 
for the Crafts to pursue their labor. On a certain day (not named 
in any of the traditional accounts), Jubela, Jubelo and Jubelum, 
placed themselves at the South, West and East gates of the Temple. 
And Hiram having finished his devotions and labor, attempted (as 
was his usual custom) to retire at the South gate, where he was met 
by Jubela, who demanded of him the Master-Mason's word (some 
say the secrets of a Master-Mason), and on his refusal to give it, 
Jubela gave him a violent blow with the twenty-four inch gauge 
across the throat, on which Hiram fled to the West gate, where he was 
accosted in the same manner by Jubelo, but with more violence. 
Hiram told him that he could not give the word then, because Solo- 
mon, King of Israel, Hiram, King of Tyre, and himself, had entered 
into a solemn league, that the word never should be given unless they 
three were present, but if he would wait with patience until the 
Grand Lodge assembled at Jerusalem, if he was then found worthy 
he should receive it, otherwise he could not; Jubelo replied in a very 
peremptory manner ; " If you do not give me the Master's word, Fll 



56 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

take your life ; " and on Hiram's refusing to give it, Jubelo gave 
him a severe blow with the square across the left breast, on which he 
fled to the East gate, where he was accosted by Jubelum in the same 
manner, but with still more violence. Here Hiram reasoned as 
before; Jubelum told him that he had heard his caviling with Jubela 
and Jubelo long enough, and that the Master's word had been prom- 
ised to him from time to time, for a long time, that he was. still put 
off and the Temple was almost finished, and he was determined to 
have the word or take his life. " I want it so that I may be able to 
get wages as a Master-Mason in any country to which I may go for 
employment, after the Temple is finished, and that I may be able to 
support my wife and children." Hiram, persisting in his refusal, 
Jubelum gave him a violent blow with the gavel on the forehead, 
which felled him on the floor and killed him. They took the body 
and carried it out of the West gate and buried it in the rubbish until 
low twelve at night (which is twelve o'clock), when they three met 
agreeably to appointment, and carried the body a westerly course and 
buried it at the brow of a hill in a grave dug due east and west, six 
feet perpendicular, and made their escape. King Solomon coming 
up to the Temple at low six in the morning (as was his usual cus- 
tom), found the Crafts all in confusion; and on inquiring the cause, 
was informed that their Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff, was missing, 
and there were no plans and designs laid down on the Trestle-board 
for the Crafts to pursue their labor. Solomon ordered immediate 
search to be made in and about the Temple for. him; no discovery 
being made, he then ordered the Secretary to call the roll of workmen 
to see if any were missing ; it appearing that there were three, viz. : 
Jubela, Jubelo and Jubelum, Solomon observed, " This brings to my 
mind a circumstance that took place this morning. Twelve Fellow- 
Crafts came to me dressed in white gloves and aprons in token of their 
innocence, and confessed that they twelve, with three others, had 
conspired to extort the Master Mason's word from their Grand Mas- 
ter, Hiram Abbiff, and in case of his refusal to take his life; they 
twelve had recanted, but feared the other three had been base enough 
to carry their atrocious design into execution/' Solomon immediately 
ordered twelve Fellow-Crafts to be selected from the bands of work- 
men, clothed in white gloves and aprons in token of their innocence, 
and sent three East, three West, three North, and three South, in 
search of the ruffians, and if found to bring them up before him. 
The three that traveled a westerly course, coming near the coast of 
Joppa, fell in with a wayfaring man, who informed them that he had 
seen three men pass that way that morning, who, from their appear- 
ance and dress, were workmen from the Temple, inquiring for a 
passage to Ethiopia, but were unable to obtain one in consequence of 
an embargo which had recently been laid on all the shipping, and had 
turned back into the country. After making still further and more 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 57 

diligent search, and making no further discovery, they returned to the 
Temple and reported to Solomon the result of their pursuit and in- 
quiries. On which Solomon directed them to go and search again, 
and search until they found their Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff, if 
possible, and if he was not found, the twelve who had confessed should 
be considered as the murderers and suffer accordingly. 

' They returned again in pursuit of the ruffians, and one of the 
three that traveled a westerly course, being more weary than the rest, 
sat down at the brow of a hill to rest and refresh himself; and, in 
attempting to rise, caught hold of a sprig of cassia, which easily gave 
way, and excited his curiosity, and made him suspicious of a decep- 
tion, on which he hailed his companions, who immediately assembled, 
and, on examination, found that the earth had been recently removed ; 
and on moving the rubbish, discovered the appearance of a grave; and 
while they were confabulating about what measures to take, they 
heard voices issuing from a cavern in the clefts of the rocks, on which, 
they immediately repaired to the place, where they heard the voice of 
Jubela exclaim, i ! that my throat had been cut across, and my 
tongue torn out, and my body buried in the rough sands of the sea 
at low-water mark, where the tide ebbs and flows twice in twenty-four 
hours, ere I had been accessory to the death of so good a man as our 
Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff ' — on which, they distinctly heard the 
voice of Jubelo exclaim, ' ! that my breast had been torn open, and 
my heart and vitals taken from thence and thrown over my left 
shoulder, to the valley of Jehosaphat, there to become a prey to the 
wild beasts of the field and vultures of the air, ere I had conspired to 
take the life of so good a man as our Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff ' — 
when they more distinctly heard the voice of Jubelum exclaim, ( ! 
that my body had been severed in two in the midst, and divided to the 
North and the South, my bowels burned to ashes in the center, and 
the ashes scattered by the four winds of heaven, that there might not 
remain the least track or trace of remembrance among men or Masons 
of so vile and perjured a wretch as I am, who willfully took the life 
of so good a man as our Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff. Ah ! Jubela 
and Jubelo, it was I that struck him harder than you both ! it was I 
that gave him the fatal blow ! it was I that killed him outright ! ' 
On which, they rushed forward, seized, bound anil carried them up ' 
before King Solomon, who, after hearing the testimony of the three 
Fellow-Crafts, and the three ruffians having pleaded guilty, ordered 
them to be taken out at the West gate of the Temple and executed 
agreeably to the several imprecations of their own mouths. King 
Solomon then ordered fifteen Fellow-Crafts to be selected from the 
bands of the workmen, clothed with white gloves and aprons, in token 
of their innocence, and sent three East, three West, three North, 
three South, and three in and about the Temple, in search of their 
Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff; and the three that traveled a westerly 



58 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

course found it under that sprig of cassia where a worthy brother 
sat down to rest and refresh himself; and on removing the earth 
until they came to the coffin, they involuntarily found their hands 
raised, as hereinbefore described, to guard their nostrils against the 
offensive effluvia that arose from the grave. It is also said that the 
body had lain there fourteen days, some say fifteen. The body was 
raised in the manner hereinbefore described, carried up to the Temple, 
and buried as explained in the closing clauses of the lecture. Not 
one third part of the preceding history of this degree is ever given to 
a Candidate. A few general, desultory, unconnected 'ernarks are 
made to him, and he is generally referred to the manner of raising, 
and the lecture, for information as to the particulars. Here follows 
a charge which ought to be, and sometimes is, c severed to the 
Candidate after hearing the history of the degree. 



AN ADDRESS TO BE DELIVERED TO THE CANDIDATE 
AFTER THE HISTORY HAS BEEN GIVEN. 

' Brother, your zeal for the Institution of Masonry, the progress you 
have made in the mystery, and your conformity to our regulations, 
have pointed you out as a proper object of our favor and esteem. 

'You are bound by duty, honor, and gratitude, to* be faithful to 
your trust ; to support the dignity of your character on every occasion : 
and to enforce, by precept and example, obedience to the tenets of 
the Order. 

< In the character of a Master-Mason, you are authorized to correct 
the errors and irregularities of your uninformed brethren, and to 
guard them against a breach of fidelity. 

' To preserve the reputation of the Fraternity unsullied, must be 
your constant care; and for this purpose it is your province to recom- 
mend to your inferiors, obedience and submission ; to your equals, 
courtesy and affability; to your superiors, kindness and condescen- 
sion. Universal benevolence you are always to inculcate; and, by 
the regularity of your own behavior, afford the best example for the 
conduct of others less informed. The ancient landmarks of the 
Order, intrusted to your care, you are carefully to preserve ; and never 
suffer them to be infringed, or countenance a deviation from the 
established usages and customs of the Fraternity. 

' Your virtue, honor, and reputation are concerned in supporting 
with dignity the character you now bear. Let no motive, therefore, 
make you swerve from your duty, violate your vows, or betray your 
trust ; but be true and faithful, and imitate the example of that cele- 
brated artist whom you this evening represent; thus you will render 
yourself deserving the honor which we have conferred, and merit 
the confidence that we have reposed.' 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 59 

Here follows the lecture on this degree, which is divided into three 
sections. 

SECTION FIRST 

Q. Are you a Master-Mason? 

A. I am — try me — prove me — disprove me, if you can. 

Q. Where was you prepared to be made a Master Mason? 

A. In a room adjacent to the body of a just and lawfully consti- 
tuted Lodge of such, duly assembled in a room, representing the 
sanctum sanctorum, or holy of holies, of Kin :. Solomon's Temple. 

Q. How was you prepared? 

A. By being divested of all metals; neither naked nor clothed, 
barefoot nor shod; with a Cable-Tow three times about my naked 
body; in which posture I was conducted to the door of the Lodge, 
where I gave three distinct knocks. 

Q. What did those three distinct knocks allude to? 

A. To the third degree of Masonry; it being that on which I was 
about to enter. 

Q. What was said to you from within? 

A. Who comes there? who comes there? who comes there? 

Q. Your answer? 

A. A worthy brother, who has regularly been initiated as an 
Entered Apprentice Mason, passed to the degree of a Fellow-Craft, 
and now wishes for further light in Masonry by being raised to the 
lublime degree of a Master-Mason. 

Q. What further was said to you from within? 

A. I was asked if it was of my own free will and accord I made 
that request; if I was duly and truly prepared, worthy and well 
qualified, and had made .suitable proficiency in the preceding degrees; 
all of which being answered in the affirmative, I was asked by what 
further rights I expected to obtain that benefit. 

Q. Your answer? A. By the benefit of a pass-word. 

Q. What is the pass-word? A. Tubal Cain. 

Q. What next was said to you? 

A. I was bid to wait until the Worshipful Master in the East was 
made acquainted with my request, and his answer returned. 

Q. What followed after his answer was returned? 

A. I was caused to enter the Lodge on the two extreme points of 
the compass pressing my naked right and left breasts, in the name 
of the Lord. 

Q. How was you then disposed of? 

A. I was conducted three times regularly round the Lodge, and 
halted at the Junior Warden in the South, where the same questions 
were asked and answers returned as at the door. 

Q. How did the Junior Warden dispose of vou ? 

A. He ordered me to be conducted to the Senior Warden in the 



60 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

West, where the same questions were asked and answers returned as 
before. 

Q. How did the Senior Warden dispose of you. 

A. He ordered me to be conducted to the Worshipful Master in 
the East, where by him the same questions were asked and answers 
returned as before, who likewise demanded of me, from whence I 
came, and whither I was traveling. 

Q. Your answer ? A. From the West, and traveling to the East. 

Q. Why do you leave the West and travel to the East? 

A. In search of light. 

Q. How did the Worshipful Master then dispose of you ? 

A. He ordered me to be conducted back to the West, from whence 
I came, and put in care of the Senior Warden, who taught me how 
to approach the East, by advancing upon three upright regular steps 
to the third step, my feet forming a square, and my body erect at the 
altar before the Worshipful Master. 

Q. What did the Worshipful Master do with you. 

A. He made an obligated Master-Mason of me. 

Q. How? A. In due form. 

Q. What was that due form? 

A. Both my knees bare bent, they forming a square; both hands 
on the Holy Bible, square and compass ; in which posture I took upon 
me the solemn oath or obligation of a Master-Mason. 

Q. After your obligation, what was said to you? 

A. What do you most desire? 

Q. Your answer? A. More light. [The bandage round the head 
is now dropped over the eyes.] 

Q. Did you receive light? A. I did. 

Q. On being brought to light on this degree, what did you first 
discover ? 

A. Three great lights in Masonry, by the assistance of three less, 
and both points of the compass elevated above the square, which 
denoted to me that I had received, or was about to receive ali the 
light that could be conferred on me in a Master's Lodge. 

Q. What did you next discover? 

A. The Worshipful Master approaching me from the East under 
the sign and due-guard of a Master-Mason, who presented me with 
his right hand in token of brotherly love and confidence, and pro- 
ceeded to give me the pass-grip and word of a Master-Mason [the 
word is the name of the pass-grip], and bid me rise and salute the 
Junior and Senior Wardens and convince them that I was an obli- 
gated Master-Mason, and had the sign, pass-grip and word. (Tubal 
Cain.) 

Q. What did you next discover? 

A. The Worshipful Master approaching me a second time from 
the East, who presented me with a lamb-skin or white apron, which he 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 61 

said he hoped I would continue to wear with honor to myself, and 
satisfaction and advantage to the brethren. 

Q. What was you next presented with? 

A. The working' tools of a Master-Mason. 

Q. What are they ? 

A. All the implements of Masonry indiscriminately, but more 
especially the trowel. 

Q. How explained ? 

A. The trowel is an instrument made use of by operative Masons 
to spread the cement which unites a building into one common mass, 
but we, as Free and Accepted Masons, are taught to make use of it 
for the more noble and glorious purpose of spreading the cement of 
brotherly love and affection; that cement which unites us into one 
sacred band or society of brothers, among whom no contention shall 
ever exist, but that noble emulation, of who can best work or best 
agree. 

Q. What was you next presented with? A. Three precious jewels. 

Q. What are they ? 

A. Humanity, Friendship, and Brotherly Love. 

Q. How was you then disposed of? 

A. I was conducted out of the Lodge, and invested with what I had 
been divested, and returned again in due season. 

SECTION SECOND 

Q. Did you ever return to the sanctum sanctorum or holy of holies 
of King Solomon's Temple? A. I did. 

Q. Was there anything particular took place on your return? 

A. There was, viz. : I was accosted by three ruffians, who demanded 
of me the Master-Mason's word. 

Q. Did you give it to them? 

A. I did not, but bid *them wait with time and patience until the 
Grand Lodge assembled at Jerusalem; and then, if they were found 
worthy, they should receive it; otherwise they could not. 

Q. In what manner was you accosted? 

A. In attempting to retire at the South gate, I was accosted by one 
of them, who demanded of me the Master-Mason's word, and on my 
refusing to comply with his request, he gave me a blow with the 
twenty-four inch gauge across my breast, on which I fled to the West 
gate, where I was accosted by the second with more violence, and on 
my refusing to comply with his request, he gave me a severe blow 
with the square across my breast, on which I attempted to make my 
escape at the East gate, where I was accosted by the third with still 
more violence, and on my refusing to comply with his request, he 
gave me a violent blow with the common gavel, on the forehead, and 
brought me to the floor. 

Q. Whom did you represent at that time? 



62 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

A. Our Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff, who was slain at the building 
of King Solomon's Temple. 

Q. Was his death premeditated? 

A. It was, by fifteen Fellow-Crafts, who conspired to extort the 
Master-Mason's word; twelve of whom recanted, but the other three 
were base enough to carry their atrocious designs into execution. 

Q. What did they do with the body ? 

A. They carried it out at the West gate of the Temple and buried 
it until low twelve at night, when they three met agreeably to appoint- 
ment, and carried it a westerly course from the Temple, and buried 
it under the brow of a hill in a grave six feet due east and west, six 
feet perpendicular, and made their escape. 

Q. What time was he slain? A. At high twelve at noon, when the 
Crafts were from labor to refreshment. 

Q. How came he to be alone at that time? 

A. Because it was the usual custom of our Grand Master, Hiram 
Abbiff, every day at high twelve, when the Crafts ^were from labor to 
refreshment, to enter into the sanctum sanctorum or holy of holies, 
and offer up his adorations to the ever-living God, and draw out his 
plans and designs on his Trestle-board for the Crafts to pursue their 
labor. 

Q. At what time was he missing? 

A. At low six in the morning, when King Solomon came up to the 
Temple as usual to view the work, and found the Crafts all in con- 
fusion, and on inquiring the cause, he was informed that their Grand 
Master, Hiram Abbiff, was missing, and no plans or designs were 
laid down on the Trestle-board for the Crafts to pursue their labor. 

Q. What observations did King Solomon make at that time? 

A. He observed that our Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff, had always 
been very punctual in attending, and feared that he was indisposed, 
and ordered search to be made in and about the Temple, to see if he 
could be found. 

Q. Search being made, and he not found, what further remarks 
did King Solomon make? 

A. He observed, he feared some fatal accident had befallen our 
Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff; that morning, twelve Fellow-Crafts, 
clothed in white gloves and aprons in token of their innocence, had 
confessed that they twelve, with three others, had conspired to extort 
the Master-Mason's word from their Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff, or 
take his life ; that they twelve had recanted, but feared the other three 
had been base enough to carry their atrocious designs into execution. 

Q. What followed ? 

A. King Solomon ordered the roll of workmen to be called to see 
if there were any missing. 

Q. The roll being called, were there any missing? 

A. There were three, viz. : Jubela, Jubelo, and Jubelum. 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 63 

Q. Were the ruffians ever found? 

A. They were. 

Q. How? 

A. By the wisdom of King Solomon, who ordered twelve Fellow- 
Crafts to be selected from the bands of the workmen, clothed in white 
gloves and aprons, in token of their innocence, and sent three East, 
three West, three North, and three South, in search of the ruffians, 
and if found, to bring them forward. 

Q. What success? 

A. The three that traveled a westerly course from the Temple, 
coming near the coast of Joppa, were informed by a wayfaring man, 
that three men had been seen that way that morning, who from their 
appearance and dress were workmen from the Temple, inquiring for 
a passage to Ethiopia, but were unable to obtain one in consequence 
of an embargo which had recently been laid on all the shipping, and 
had turned back into the country. 

Q. What followed? . 

A. King Solomon ordered them to go and search again, and search 
until they were found, if possible, and if they were not found, that 
the twelve who had confessed should be considered as the reputed 
murderers, and suffer accordingly. 

Q. What success? 

A. One of the three that traveled a westerly course from the Tem- 
ple, being more weary than the rest, sat down under the brow of a 
hill to rest and refresh himself, and in attempting to rise, caught 
hold of a sprig of cassia, which easily gave way, and excited his 
curiosity and made him suspicious of a deception, on which he hailed 
his companions, who immediately assembled, and on examination, 
found that the earth had recently been moved, and on moving the 
rubbish discovered the appearance of a grave; and while they were 
confabulating about what measures to take, they heard voices issuing 
from a cavern in the cleft of the rocks; on which they immediately 
.repaired to the place, where they heard the voice of Jubela exclaim, 
' 0, that my throat had been cut across, my tongue torn out, and my 
body buried in the rough sands of the sea at low water-mark, where 
the tide ebbs and flows twice in twenty-four hours, ere I had been 
accessory to the death of so good a man as our Grand Master, Hiram 
Abbiff ! ' On which they distinctly heard the voice of Jubelo ex- 
claim, ' 0, that my left breast had been torn open, and my heart and 
vitals taken from thence, thrown over my left shoulder, carried to the 
valley of Jehosaphat, there to become a prey to the wild beasts of the 
field and vultures of the air, ere I had conspired to take the life of so 
good a man as our Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff ! ' when they more 
distinctly heard the voice of Jubelum exclaim, ' 0, that my body 
had been severed in two in the midst, and divided to the North and 
the South, and my bowels burned to ashes in the center, and the 



64 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

hshes scattered before (or by) the four winds of heaven, that there 
taight not remain the least track or trace of remembrance among men 
or Masons of so vile and perjured a wretch as I am, who willfully 
took the life of so good a man as our Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff! 
Ah, Jubela and Jubelo, it was I that struck him harder than you 
both, it was I that gave him the fatal blow, it was I that killed him 
outright/ On which they rushed forward, seized, bound and carried 
them up to the Temple to King Solomon. 

Q. What did King Solomon do with them? 

A. He ordered them to be executed agreeably to the several impre- 
cations of their own mouths. 

Q. Was the body of our Grand Master, Hiram Abbiff, ever found? 

A. It was. 

Q. How? 

A. l>y the wisdom of King Solomon, who ordered fifteen (in some 
Lodges they say twelve) Fellow-Crafts to be selected from the bands 
of the workmen, and sent three East, three West, three North, three 
Soutb, and three in and about the Temple to search for the body. 

Q, Where was it found? 

A. Under that sprig of cassia where a worthy brother sat down to 
Test and refresh himself. 

Q. Was there anything in particular took place on the discovery of 
(he body? 

A. There was, viz. : on moving the earth till we came to the coffin, 
We involuntarily found our hands in this position, to guard our nostrils 
against the offensive effluvia which arose from the grave. 

Q. How long had the body lain there? A. Fourteen days. 

Q. What did they do with the body? 

A. Raised it in a Masonic form and carried it up to the Temple for 
more decent interment. 

Q. Where was it buried ? 

A. Under the sanctum sanctorum, or holy of holies of King Solo- 
mon's Temple, over which they erected a marble monument with this 
inscription delineated thereon. A virgin weeping over a broken 
column, with a book open before her, in her right hand a sprig of 
Cassia, in her left an urn, Time standing behind her with his hands 
infolded in the ringlets of her hair. 

Q. What do they denote? 

A. The weeping virgin denotes the unfinished state of the Temple, 
the broken column, that one of the principal supports of Masonry had 
fallen, the book open before her, that his memory was on perpetual 
record ; the sprig of cassia, the timely discovery of his grave ; the urn 
in her left hand, that his ashes are safely deposited under this sanctum 
sanctorum or holy of holies of King Solomon's Temple, and Time, 
standing behind her with his hands infolded in the ringlets of her 
hair, that time, patience, and perseverance, will accomplish all things. 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 65 



SECTION THIRD. 



Q. What does a Master's Lodge represent? A. The sanctum 
sanctorum or holy of holies of King Solomon's Temple. 

Q. How long was the Temple building? 

A. Seven years, during which it rained not in the day-time, that 
the workmen might not be obstructed in their labor. 

Q. What supported the Temple? 

A. Fourteen hundred and fifty-three columns, and two thousand 
nine hundred and six pilasters; all hewn from the finest Parian 
marble. 

Q. What further supported it ? A. Three grand columns, or pillars. 

Q. What are they called? A. Wisdom, strength, and beauty. 

Q. What did they represent ? 

A. The pillar of Wisdom represented Solomon, King of Israel, 
whose wisdom contrived the mighty fabric; the pillar of Strength, 
Hiram, King of Tyre, who strengthened Solomon in his- glorious 
undertaking; the pillar of Beauty, Hiram Abbiff, the widow's son, 
whose cunning craft, and curious workmanship beautified and adorned 
the Temple. 

Q. How many were there employed in the building of King Solo- 
mon's Temple? 

A. Three Grand Masters, three thousand three hundred Masters, 
or overseers of the work, eighty thousand Fellow-Crafts, and seventy 
thousand Entered Apprentices; all these were classed and arranged 
in such a manner by the wisdom of Solomon, that neither envy, dis- 
cord nor confusion, were suffered to interrupt that universal peace 
and tranquillity that pervaded the work at that important period. 

Q. How many constitute an Entered Apprentice Lodge? 

A. Seven : one Master and six Entered Apprentices. 

Q. Where did they usually meet? 

A. On the ground floor of King Solomon's Temple. 
- Q. How many constitute a Fellow-Craft's Lodge? 

A. Five: two Masters, and three Fellow-Crafts. 

Q. Where did they usually meet? 

A. In the middle chamber of King Solomon's Temple. 

Q. How many constitute a Master's Lodge? A. Three Master- 
Masons. 

Q. Where did they usually meet? 

A. In the sanctum sanctorum or holy of holies of King Solomon's 
Temple. 

Q. Have you any emblems on this degree ? What are the first class ? 

A. The pot of incense; the bee-hive; the book of constitutions 
guarded by the Tyler's sword; the sword pointing to a naked heart; 
the all-seeing eye; the anchor and ark; the forty-seventh problem of 
Euclid; the hour-glass; the scythe; and the three steps usually deline- 



66 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

ated on the Master's carpet, which are thus explained: The pot of 
incense is an emblem of a pure heart, which is always an acceptable 
sacrifice to the Deity; and as this glows with fervent heat, so should 
our hearts continually glow with gratitude to the great and beneficent 
Author of our existence, for the manifold blessings and comforts we 
enjoy. — The bee-hive, is an emblem of industry, and recommends 
the practice of that virtue to all created beings, from the highest 
6eraph in heaven, to the lowest reptile of the dust. It teaches us that, 
as we came into the world rational intelligent beings, so we should 
ever be industrious ones; never sitting down contented while our 
fellow creatures around us are in want; when it is in our power to 
relieve them, without inconvenience to ourselves. When we take a 
survey of nature, we behold man, in his infancy, more helpless and 
indigent than the brute creation; he lies languishing for days, weeks, 
months, and years, totally incapable of providing sustenance for him- 
self ; of guarding against the attacks of the wild beasts of the field, 
or sheltering himself from the inclemencies of the weather. It might 
have pleased the great Creator of heaven and earth to have made man 
independent of all other beings; but, as dependence is one of the 
strongest bonds of society, mankind were made dependent on each 
other for protection and security, as they thereby enjoy better oppor- 
tunities of fulfilling the duties of reciprocal love and friendship. 
Thus was man formed for social and active life, the noblest part of 
the work of God; and he that will so demean himself as not to be 
endeavoring to add to the common stock of knowledge and under- 
standing, may be deemed a drone in the hive of nature, a useless 
member of society, and unworthy of our protection as Masons. — The 
Boole of Constitutions, guarded by the Tyler s sword, reminds^us that 
we should be ever watchful and guarded in our thoughts, words and 
actions, particularly when before the enemies of Masonry; ever bear- 
ing in remembrance those truly Masonic virtues, silence and circum- 
spection. — The sword pointing to a naked heart, demonstrates that 
justice will sooner or later overtake us; and although our thoughts, 
words, and actions may be hidden from the eyes of man, yet that 
all-seeing eye, whom the sun, moon, and stars .obey, and under whose 
watchful care even comets perform their stupendous revolutions, 
pervades the inmost recesses of the human heart, and will reward us 
according to our merits. — The anchor and ark, are emblems of a 
well-grounded hope and a well spent life. They are emblematical of 
that divine ark which safely wafts us over this tempestuous sea of 
troubles, and that anchor which shall safely moor us in a peaceful 
harbor, where the wicked cease from troubling, and the weary shall 
find rest.— The forty-seventh problem of Euclid. This was an inven- 
tion of our ancient friend and brother, the great Pythagoras, who, in 
his travels through Asia, Africa, and Europe, was initiated into 
several orders of priesthood, and raised to the sublime degree of a 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 67 

Master-Mason. This wise philosopher enriched his mind abundantly 
in a general knowledge of things, and more especially in geometry, or 
Masonry : on this subject he drew out many problems and theorems ; 
and among the most distinguished he erected this, which, in the joy 
of his heart, he called Eureka, in the Grecian language signifying 
/ have found it; and upon the discovery of which he is said to have 
discovered a hecatomb. It teaches Masons to be general lovers of the 
arts and sciences. — The hour-glass is an emblem of human life. Be- 
hold ! how swiftly the sands run, and how rapidly our lives are draw- 
ing to a close. We cannot without astonishment behold the little 
particles which are contained in this machine; how they pass away 
almost imperceptibly, and yet, to our surprise, in the short space of 
an hour they are all exhausted. Thus wastes man ! to-day he puts 
forth the tender leaves of hope; to-morrow, blossoms, and bears his 
blushing honors thick upon him; the next day comes a frost which 
nips the shoot, and when he thinks his greatness is still ripen- 
ing, he falls, liks autumn leaves, to enrich our mother earth. — The 
scythe is an emblem of time, which cuts the brittle thread of life, and 
launches us into eternity. Behold ! what havoc the scythe of time 
makes among the human race; if by chance we should escape the 
numerous evils incident to childhood and youth, and with health 
and vigor arrive to the years of manhood, yet withal we must soon 
be cut down by the all-devouring scythe of time, and be gathered 
into the land where our fathers have gone before us. — The three steps 
usually delineated upon the Master's carpet, are emblematical of the 
three principal stages of human life, viz. : youth, manhood, and age. 
In youth, as Entered Apprentices, we ought industriously to occupy 
our minds in the attainment of useful knowledge: in manhood, as 
Fellow-Crafts, we should apply our knowledge to the discharge of 
our respective duties to God, our neighbors, and ourselves; that so 
in age, as Master-Masons, we may enjoy the happy reflections con- 
sequent on a well-spent life, and die in the hope of a glorious 
immortality. 

Q. What are the second class of Emblems? 

A. The spade, coffin, death-head, marrow-bones, and sprig of cassia, 
which are thus explained: The spade opens the vault to receive our 
bodies, where our active limbs will soon molder to dust. — The coffin, 
death-head, and marrow bones, are emblematical of the death and 
burial of our Grand Maste^r, Hiram Abbiff, and are worthy of our 
serious attention. The sprig of cassia is emblematical of that immor- 
tal part of man which never dies — and when the cold winter of death 
shall have passed, and the bright summer's morn of the resurrection 
appears, the Sun of Righteousness shall descend, and send forth his 
angels to collect our ransomed dust ; then, if we are found worthy, by 
his pass-word, we shall enter into that celestial Lodge above, where 
the Supreme Architect of the Universe presides, where we shall see 



68 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

the King in the beauty of holiness, and with him enter into an endless 
eternity. 

Here end the first three degrees of Masonry, which constitute a 
Master-Mason's Lodge. A Master-Mason's Lodge and a Chapter of 
Royal Arch Masons are two distinct bodies, wholly independent of 
each other. The members of a Chapter are privileged to visit all 
Master-Masons' Lodges when they please, and may be, and often are, 
members of both at the same time; and all the members of a Master- 
Mason's Lodge who are Royal Arch Masons, though not members of 
any Chapter, may visit any Chapter. I wish the reader to understand 
that neither all Royal Arch Masons nor Master-Masons are members 
of either Lodge or Chapter: there are tens of thousands who are not 
members, and scarcely ever attend although privileged to do so. 

A very small proportion of Masons, comparatively speaking, ever 
advance any further than the third degree, and consequently never 
get the great word which was lost by Hiram's untimely death. Solo- 
mon, King of Israel, Hiram, King of Tyre, and Hiram Abbiff, the 
widow's son, having sworn that they, nor either of them would ever 
give the word except they three were present [and it is generally 
believed that there was not another person in the world at that time 
that had it] ; consequently, the word was lost, and supposed to be 
forever; but the sequel will show it was found, after a lapse of four 
hundred and seventy years, notwithstanding the word Mah-hah-bone, 
which was substituted by Solomon, still continues to be used by 
Master-Masons, and no doubt will as long as Masonry attracts the 
attention of men; and the word which was lost is used in the Royal 
Arch degree. What was the word of the Royal Arch degree before 
they found the Master's word, which was lost at the death of Hiram 
Abbiff, and was not found for four hundred and seventy years? 
Were there any Royal Arch Masons before the Master's word was 
found? — I wish some Masonic gentleman would solve these two 
questions. 

The ceremonies, history, and the lecture, in the preceding degree, 
are so similar, that, perhaps some one of the three might have been 
dispensed with, and the subject well understood by most readers; 
notwithstanding, there is a small difference between the work and 
history, and between the history and the lecture. 

I shall now proceed with the Mark-Master's degree, which is the 
first degree in the Chapter. The Mark-Master's degree, the Past- 
Master's and the Most Excellent Master's are called Lodges of Mark- 
Master Masons, Past-Masters, and Most Excellent Masters; yet, al- 
though called Lodges, they are a component part of the Chapter. 
Ask a Mark-Master Mason if he belongs to the Chapter, he will tell 
you he does, but that he has only been marked. It is not an 
uncommon thing by any means, for a Chapter to confer all four 
of the degrees in one night, viz. : the Mark-Master, Past-Master, Most 
Excellent Master, and Royal Arch Degrees. 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 69 



THE FOLLOWING ARE THE SIGNS, DUE-GUARDS, GRIPS, 
WORDS, AND PASS-WORDS OP THE THREE PRECED- 
ING DEGREES. 

ENTERED APPRENTICE'S DEGREE. 

Sign.— Hold the two hands transversely across each other, the right 
hand upward and one inch from the left. 

Due-Guord. — Draw the right hand across the throat, the thumb 
next to the throat, the arm as high as the elbow in the horizontal 
position, and let the hand fall down by the side. 

Grip. — The right hands are joined together, as in shaking hands, 
and each sticks his thumb-nail in the third joint or upper end of the 
fore-finger. 

Word. — BO-AZ, which is given by lettering or halving. 

fellow-craft's degree. 

Sign. — Draw your right hand flat, with the palm of it next to your 
breast, across the breast, from left to right, with some quickness, as 
if you were going to tear open the left breast, and let it drop down 
by your side. 

Due-Guard. — Raise the left arm until that part of it between the 
£lbow and the shoulder is perfectly horizontal, and raising the rest 
of the arm in a vertical position, so that that part of the arm below 
the elbow, and that part above it, form a square. The sign and due* 
guard are given at the same time in this degree. 

Pass-Grip. — Take each other by the right hand, as if to shake hands, 
and each put his thumb between the fore and second fingers, where 
they join the hand, and pressing the thumb between the joints. The 
name of the pass-grip is Shibboleth, and is the pass-word. 

Real-Grip. — Take each other by the right hand, as if to shake 
hands, and put the thumb on the joint of the second finger where it 
joins the hand, and crooking the thumb so that each can stick the 
nail of his thumb into the joint of the other. 

Word. — JA-CHIN — given in the same manner as in the first 
degree. 

master-mason's degree. 

Sign. — Raise both hands and arms perpendicularly, one on either 
side of the head, the elbow forming a square. The words accompany- 
ing this sign, in case of distress, are, ' Lord my God, is there no 
help for the widow's son ? ' As the last words are pronounced let the 
hands fall with an air of solemnity. — These words cannot be given 



70 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

except in the dark, when the sign cannot be seen, and is the sign of 
distress in this degree. 

Due-Guard. — Put the right hand to the left side of the bowels, the 
hand open, with the thumb next to the belly, and let it fall; this is 
done tolerably quick. 

Pass-Grip. — Press the thumb between the joints of the second and 
third fingers where they join the hand. The name of it is Tubal- 
Cain, and is the pass-word. 

Real-Grip. — Take hold of each other's right hand, as if to shake 
hands, and stick the nails of each of your fingers into the joint of the 
other's wrist, where it unites with the hand. 

Word.— MAH-HAH-BONE. The word must be given in the 
following manner: — Place the inside of the right foot to the inside 
of the right foot of the person to whom you are going to give the 
word; the inside of your knee to his; laying your right breast against 
his; your left hands on each other's back, and your mouths to each 
other's right ear, when the word must be given not above a whisper. 
This word is sometimes vulgarly pronounced Mah-mah-bo. 

A more full explanation of the signs, grips, words, &c, will be 
given at the conclusion of the second part of this work, which will 
comprise the following degrees, viz. : Mark-Master, Present or Past- 
Master, Most Excellent Master, and the Royal Arch. 

Note. — The publisher thinks proper to state, that as there has been much excitement 
on the appearance of this book, and various opinions as to the truth of the same, that 
the author of it was kidnapped and carried away from Batavia, by members of the Fra- 
ternity, to parts unknown, since which time he has not been heard from— and that at the 
late session of the Court of Oyer and Terminer, held at Canandaigua, Ontario Co., N. Y. 
on the 1st January, 1827, Loton Lawson, Nicholas G. Cheesbro, Edward Sawyer and John 
Sheldon, were arraigned for conspiring to do the same— the three first plead GUILTY to 
the charge, and Sheldon was tried and found GUILTY. They are now enduring their 
punishment, which was imprisonment in the common Jail of the county, for the following 
terms : — 

Loton Lawson, 2 years, Nicholas G. Cheesbro, 1 year, John Sheldon, 2 months, Edward 
Sawyer, 1 month. 



A KEY TO THE HIGHER DEGREES OF FREEMASONRY. 



THE MANNER OF OPENING A LODGE OP MARK-MASTER 

MASONS. 

A Master-Mason progressing from the third degree to the fourth 
enters an entire new field of operations. The Mark Degree to the 
Master-Mason, is what the Entered Apprentice's is to the uninitiated. 
From a regular routine of operations- and proceeding, with only 
some slight difference in grips, words, signs, &c, he enters a field 
almost totally dissimilar, in every respect. But to our subject. 

The brethren being assembled, and the officers having repaired to 
their several stations, the Master addresses the Junior Overseer as 
follows : 

Master. Brother Jabal,* are all things in preparation for the 
work ? 

Junior Overseer. All things are in readiness, Worshipful. 

Master. Then let every Brother present mark well the entering in 
of the house: observe your Master! 

The Master now descends from his station, and approaches a small 
Temple, which has been previously erected on the middle of the floor, 
with blocks of wood in the shape of bricks, but not half so large. 
Every Mark Lodge is provided with these blocks, and everything fits 
with such an exact nicety, that the whole can be put together in the 
space of fifteen minutes, so as to form a perfect miniature of King 
Solomon's Temple, with all its porticoes and other ornaments. The 
Master approaches the front of this little Temple, which faces the 
east, and opens a small golden door, when a transparent view is had 
within, of the Sanctum Sanctorum or Holy of Holies. Immediately 
above (yet within the Temple), are two golden Cherubims,! support- 
ing between them a key stone, with a circle of eight letters on it, 
which will be explained hereafter. The Master then kneels, and 
while viewing this interior illumination, repeats the following: 

' Great Architect of the universe, we approach thy Holy Tabernacle 

* Jabal was the name of a certain Junior Overseer at the building of King Solomon's 
Temple, whom this officer, in every Mark Lodge, represents.— See Note, page 74. 

+ Over the ark (which contained the manna), was the mercy-seat, and it was the cover- 
ing of it. It was all made of solid gold, and of the thickness of a hand's breath. At the 
two ends of it were two cherubims, looking inward toward each other, with wings expanded 
which, embracing the whole circumference of the mercy-seat, did meet on each side in the 
middle: all of which was made of the same mass, without joining any of the parts by 
solder. Here it was, where the Shechinah, or divine presence, rested both in the tabernacle 
and temple, and was visibly seen in the appearances of a cloud over it. And hence it is, that 
God is so often said in Scripture to dwell between the Cherubims, that is, between the 
Cherubims on the mercy-seat, because there was the seat or throne of the visible appear- 
ance of his glory among them.— H. Prideaux, vol. 1, p. 298. 

71 



72 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY 

with a sincere desire that our works may tend to magnify Thy Holy 
Name, and to disseminate the cement of Brotherly Love, throughout 
the secret recesses of the human heart. Grant that our work may 
be approved in thy sight, and finally that each of us may be fitted 
and prepared for " that spiritual building, that house not made with 
hands, eternal in the heavens ! " ' 

Response by brethren. ' So mote it be!' 

The preceding prayer is not universally used on this occasion; the 
following is often substituted: 

' Wherefore, brethren, lay aside all malice, and guile, and hypoc- 
risies, and envies, and all evil- speakings. If so be ye have tasted that 
the Lord is gracious, to whom coming as unto a living stone, dis- 
allowed indeed of men, but chosen of God, and precious: ye also, as 
living stones, be ye built up a spiritual house, an holy priesthood, to 
offer up sacrifices- acceptable to God. Wherefore, also, it is con- 
tained in the Scriptures, Behold, I lay in Zion, for a foundation, a 
tried stone, a precious corner stone, a sure foundation; he that 
believeth shall not make haste to pass it over. Unto you, therefore, 
which believe, it is an honor; and even to them which be disobedient, 
the stone which the builders disallowed, the same is made the head 
of the corner. Brethren, this is the will of God, that with well-doing 
you put to silence the ignorance of foolish men. As free, and not 
using your liberty for a cloak of maliciousness, but as the servants of 
God. Honor all men, love the brotherhood, fear God/ 

During the rehearsal of one of the preceding prayers, the brethren 
all kneel around the Temple, and at the conclusion, they all arise, 
and each in his turn kneels in front of the golden door, as they pass 
around, and while viewing the golden Cherubims and other beauties 
within, he exclaims, ' H. T. W. S. S. T. K. &' 

Having gone through with these ceremonies, the brethren all stand- 
ing in a circle around the Temple, the Master proceeds to his station, 
and holds up to the view of the brethren a key stone, with the above 
initials on it, which he reads aloud thus : ' He That Was Slain Soars 
To Kindred Spirits : ' and repeats, ' He That Was Slain Soars To 
Kindred Spirits.' This has allusion to the ancient Grand Master, 
Hiram, whose fatal catastrophe is explained in the Third Degree. 
The origin of this Key Stone, with these initials on it, is very curious, 
and will be explained in its proper place. The Master now proclaims 
the Lodge open as follows: 

Master. Brethren, we are again assembled around this Altar of 
Peace. May the extended wings of the golden Cherubim continually 
remind us of the unbounded latitude of Masonic Charity. May the 
Lord prosper our work, to the honor of His Holy Name. 

Response by the brethren. 'So mote it be!' 

Master. ' Observe your Master.' 

The brethren all join in giving the due-guard, sign, and clasp. 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY 73 

Master. I now proclaim this Lodge duly and truly prepared for 
labor. The Junior Overseer will give notice hereof to the Tyler, and 
the brethren will retire to their several stations. 

The golden door is now closed, the brethren take their stations, and 
thus ends the ceremony of opening a Lodge of Mark-Master Masons. 



FOURTH DEGREE OF MASONRY. 

THE MODE AND MANNER OF CONFERRING THE DEGREE OF MARK-MASTER MASON ON A CANDIDATE, 
IT BEING THE FOURTH DEGREE OF MASONRY ; TOGETHER WITH THE MEANS TO BE USED BY SUCH 
AS ARE NOT MASONS, TO GAIN ADMISSION INTO ANY LODGE OF MARK-MASTERS ON THE FACE OF 
THE GLOBE. 

A Master-Mason who lias petitioned the Chapter to have con- 
ferred on him the Degree of a Mark-Master, is balloted for, as in the 
preceding Degrees; and if accepted, will be conducted into a private 
room, and asked the following questions, by the Master Overseer: 

Master Overseer. Brother A. B., having progressed in safety to the 
third and last round of Jacob's ladder, do you wish to proceed 
further ? 

Candidate. I do, with your permission. 

Master Overseer. Do you solemnly promise, upon your honor as a 
Master-Mason, to conform to the rules and customs observed by the 
Ancient Patriarchs who have traveled this road before you ? 

Candidate. I do most cheerfully, with your permission. 

The Overseer then informs the Candidate that he is" about entering 
a new apartment of the Temple, and recommends him to betray no 
fears during the numerous trials and difficulties he is about to en- 
counter; that all who have traveled this way before him, have bravely 
submitted to the same, &c. If the candidate makes no objection, he 
is deprived of all his clothing, except his shirt and drawers (the latter 
are furnished when the Candidate is without them), and his hands 
are tied closely behind him, by placing their backs together, and 
winding a strong cord four times around his arms about .midway 
between the elbow and wrist.* (It is necessary to pay strict attention 
to this ceremony, as it is the basis of a Mark-Master's Sign: remember 
his hands are placed behind him, back to back.) The Candidate is 
then enshrouded in a Purple Robe, after which he is closely blind- 
folded, by a bandage wrapped four times over his eyes, in which 
situation he is conducted into the Lodge by the Overseer. 

The Master now informs the Candidate that an Oath must be 
taken before he can progress farther, whereupon he is caused to 
mount a platform erected for the purpose, by a flight of four steps. 
There is also an altar placed on this platform, on which lies the Holy 
Bible, opened at the fourth chapter of St. Mark. The Candidate 

* Of binding and loosing— Bind not two sins together. Ec. vii. 8. 



74 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

is caused to kneel on both knees, with his face (i. e. one cheek,*) 
resting on the Holy Bible, when the following oath is administered 
by the Master: 

" In the name of God, and the Holy Prophets, I solemnly swear 
and affirm, that I will keep inviolate the mysteries pertaining to the 
Degree of a Mark-Master Mason, within my own breast, except when 
only in company with Mark-Masters. That in my intercourse with 
the world, I will use my utmost endeavors to prevent my brother 
Mark-Masters from deviating from that line of rectitude taught them 
in this Holy Sanctuary. Lastly, that I will never give the Mark- 
Master's Grand Hailing-Sign of Distress, except in actual dis- 
tress, f In the name of God, and the Holy Prophets/ 

This constitutes the Oath of a Mark-Master Mason. The cord is 
now taken from the arms of the Candidate, but his hands are held 
in the same situation behind him, back to bach, by some of the breth- 
ren, while the Master instructs him in the Due-Guard Sign of a 
Mark-Master, which is by bringing his hands around before him, and 
letting them meet, crossing each other so as to made a loud clap, 
four times in succession. (Now is the proper time for the reader 
to perfect himself in this Due-guard Sign: place your hands behind 
you with their backs together; then bring them round together cross- 
ing, making the palms hollow, so as to make a loud clap by the con- 
cussion; and this repeat four times: this is called the Mark-Master s 
Due-Guard and Clap, and will always be exacted before any one not 
known as a Mark-Master can enter a Mark-Lodge, as the Grand 
Hailing-Sign cannot be given except in " actual distress," as speci- 
fied in the Oath.) 

The Candidate is now informed that this Due-Guard Sign has 
reference to the situation of his hands when he took upon himself 
the Oath; and the clapping them together four times, has strict allu- 
sion to the Fourth Degree of Masonry. This Due-Guard Sign is al- 
lowed in mixed companies, as no one could suspect any meaning to it, 
except a Mark-Master Mason. The author of this work recollects of 
seeing this often given before he ever sat in a Mark-Lodge, and very 
likely the reader does the same. It should be done in a careless man- 
ner, in order that the unenlightened may not notice it. A Mark- 
Mason may know another by merely clapping with the hands four 
times, the same as applauding an actor on the stage in a theater, with- 
out placing his hands first behind him at all ; but this will not answer 
for one who would go in a Mark-Lodge, as there they scrutinize very 
closely, and if one be deficient in recollecting the way in which his 
hands were tied behind him, back to' back, when he took the Oath, this 

' * Jabal or Iobel— (Hebrew),— falling away— or bringing— or building— or a cheek. La- 
mech's son, by Adah, father of such as dwell in tents, and such as have cattle. See Gen. 
iv. 20. 

t This sign is not even allowed to be given in the Lodge, notwithstanding it is almost im- 
possible that any one should notice it, as the reader will discover. 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 75 

deficiency would be certain evidence that he was an impostor and 
unworthy the privilege he claimed. 

The Candidate is then told that his present situation represents the 
time previous to the creation of the world, and the Master takes him 
by the hand, and says: 

Master. ' Brother A. B., I now present you with the right hand of 
a brother, and also with the grip of this degree/ 

Here the Master takes the Candidate by the right hand, and 
presses the nail of his right thumb into the last joint of the third 
finger of the Candidate (i. e. the joint farthest from the nail), and 
requests the Candidate to do the same — which done, the Master says : 

Maste. ' This, brother, is the Grip of a Mark-Master Mason, and 
its name is emblematical of your present state. It is CHAOS; and 
as yet Brother Chaos, you are in the dark. Should you, in your 
travels, hear the CHAOS pronounced, whether in darkness or day- 
light, you may rest assured a brother Mark-Master utters it, and is 
in deep distress; and this word you are entitled to use when in like 
situation, and then only, accompanied by the Grand Hailing-Sign 
of Distress, which you will hereafter be instructed in.'* 

The Candidate is now divested of his bandages, and conducted 
down the four steps directly in front of the Temple, when the Master 
presents him with a Chisel and Mallet, which are the working tools of 
this degree ; and placing the edge of the Chisel on the right temple of 
the Candidate, orders him to 'strike and receive the mark! The 
Candidate of course declines, and this part of the ceremony is thus 
explained to him by the Master at the time : 

Master. ' Brother, it was not my intention that you should strike 
the blow, but this is intended to teach you through life, to withhold 
your arm when raised to injure a fellow-being, especially a brother, 
the same as if raised against yourself. We are all of the same fam- 
ily, and are all the children of the same Great Parent ; and all should 
strive to " do unto others, as we would that others should do unto 
us." ' 

The Candidate is then caused to kneel on both knees, when the 
golden door is opened, which presents to his view the illuminations 
within the Temple, when the Master addresses hirn as follows: 

Master. ' Brother A. B., you now discover the light by which 
Mark-Master Masons work. You are now about to be invested with 
secrets, intrusted only in the faithful breasts of Mark-Masters 
throughout the Globe ; and which will entitle you to, and ensure their 
respect and esteem, wheresoever dispersed around the known world. 
The illuminated Temple before you, is a perfect miniature of King 
Solomon's, at Jerusalem, the Holy City; the key stone, supported 
by the Cherubims with expanded wings, is the main support in all 

* It is certainly a singular coincidence, that this word of distress, and its accompanying 
Grand Hailing-Sign, should have so nearly the same sound ; as the reader will discover they 
have when he learns the Sign— Chaos— K. S. 



76 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

arches, built by operative Masons: with us, as Mark-Masons, it is 
emblematical of the binding link of brotherly love, which 
unites,* in one strong chain, all who have attained to this Honorary 
Degree. This stone, my brother, is also typical of the Stone which 
was rejected by the builders of old, and in modern days, which stone 
is truth. Truth is the Stone which unworthy builders reject, and 
which is to become the " head of the Corner." " He that hath an 
ear to hear let him hear." " To him that overcometh will I give to 
eat of the hidden manna, and will give him a white stone, and in 
the Stone a new name written, which no man knoweth save him that 
receiveth it." " The Stone which the builders refused, is become the 
head Stone of the corner." " Did ye never read in the Scriptures, 
The Stone which the builders rejected, is become the head of the 
corner ? " " And have ye not read this Scripture, The Stone which 
the builders rejected, is become the head of the corner ? " " What is 
this, then, that is written, The Stone which the builders rejected, is 
become the head of the corner? " (The God of truth, my brother.) 
" This is the Stone which was set at naught of you builders, which 
has become the head of the corner." 

' " Then he brought me back the way of the gate of the outward 
Sanctuary, which looked toward the east; and it was shut." [Here 
the Master shuts the golden gate, or door.] " Then said the Lord 
unto me, This gate shall be shut, it shall not be opened, and no man 
shall enter in by it ; because the Lord, the God of Israel, hath entered 
in by it, therefore it shall be shut. It is for the Prince, the Prince he 
shall sit in it to eat bread before the Lord ; he shall enter by the way 
of the porch of that gate, and shall go out by the way of the same. 
And the Lord said unto me, Son of Man, mark well, and behold with 
thine eyes, and hear with thine ears, all that I say unto thee con- 
cerning all the ordinances of the house of the Lord, and all the laws 
thereof; and mark well the entering in of the house, with every going 
forth of the Sanctuary." ? 

The Master now reopens the golden gate, and addresses the Candi- 
date as follows: 

Master. ' Brother A. B., I now have the pleasure to present you 
with the "■ New Name/' which " no man knoweth, saving him that 
receiveth it ; " and which is contained in the " white xione " which 
"the builders rejected." The initials you discover, are H. T. W. S. 
S. T. K. S. These as Mark-Master Masons, we read thus: He That 
Was Slain Soars To Kindred Spirits — He That Was Slain Soars to 
Kindred Spirits. 

' These initials were placed on the Key Stone of the Ninth Arch 
by King Solomon, to commemorate the melancholy death of Hiram, 
an account of which you have received in the preceding degree. This 
Key Stone had its origin as follows : A skillful workman at the build- 

* Or should unite, is frequently added by the Master, and very properly too. 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 77 

ing of King Solomon's Temple, named Kerim, after the death of his 
Grand Master, Hiram, held a consultation with King Solomon on the 
subject of the most appropriate manner in which the worth and 
excellence of this truly great and good man might be handed down 
to posterity. After considerable discussion it was agreed that these 
initials should be engraved on the Key Stone of the Ninth Arch; 
and their signification communicated to those only of this degree, 
forever; you are therefore cautioned, my brother, to divulge this mys- 
tery to no one, either within or without the Lodge, except in the fol- 
lowing manner : Should you wish to know if a stranger be a Mark- 
Master, you will say audibly, " He." No matter if room be full 
of strangers, at the time, no one except a Mark-Master, will notice 
you. If there be one present he will say, " That." You will then 
approach him, if there be others present, and in a low tone say, " Was." 
He will then (if he be a Mark-Master,) say, "Slain;" when you 
will reply, " Soars; " and he, " To; " you, " Kindred; " he, " Spirits." 
This much will satisfy each of you that -the other is a Mark-Master 
Mason; but it is necessary to speak in a voice that cannot be over- 
heard by the bystanders. This, brother, is the only way in which 
you are ever to give the signification of these initials, except you 
preside as Master over a Lodge, in which case you are allowed to 
repeat them twice at the opening of a Lodge, and twice to a Candidate, 
as I have done to you this evening.' 

At this stage of the proceedings, the Candidate is presented with 
a chair, and requested by the Master to take his seat, which he is 
very willing to do, after kneeling for so long a time. The Master 
then proceeds: 

Master. i Having progressed thus far, we now proceed to the Sanc- 
tum Sanctorum or Holy of Holies. Y"ou here discover the extended 
wings of the two Cherubims, which guard and protect the heavenly 
Manna, sent down from God out of Heaven. This Manna, brother, 
has been handed down by Mark-Master Masons, since the children of 
Israel sojourned in the wilderness; and without a portion of this, 
no Mark-Lodge could be established/ * 

Here the Master reaches his arm through the golden gate, opens 
the tabernacle, .and takes therefrom a pot of Manna, and presenting 
a morsel of it to the Candidate, in a silver spoon, proceeds as fol- 
lows: 

Master. c " To him that overcometh will I give to eat of the hid- 
den Manna" saith the Lord: take, eat, and praise His Holy Name.' 

Response by the brethren. ' And praise His Holy Name/ 

The pot of Manna and the silver spoon are then replaced in the 
Tabernacle, and the golden door is closed; when the Master addresses 
the Candidate as follows: 

* A jar of ancient Manna, was actually preserved, and used in Mark-Lodges, as far down 
as 413 years after the Christian Era ; but no one in his sober senses, will doubt that the 
Manna used in modern Mark-Lodges, is of modern production. 



78 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

Master. ' You will now arise, my brother, and receive the Mark- 
Master's Grand Hailing Sign of Distress/ 

It will be discovered, that the Master cannot give the Sign, without 
forfeiting his Oath, not being in " actual distress; " he consequently 
teaches the Candidate as follows : 

Master. * This sign, is made, brother, by raising your right 
arm in a position horizontal with the earth, and moving your right 
fore-finger (the rest being closed so as to form the letter K in the 
air, and then a period, or a dot after it, and then let your arm drop 
down by your side; you will then raise it as before, and with your 
finger form the letter S in the air, with a period or dot after it, and 
then drop your arm as before; and this is the Grand Railing-Sign of 
Distress of a Mark-Master Mason. Now, brother, please give this 
Sign, that the brethren present may see that you understand it/ 

Of nineteen cases in twenty, the Candidate raises his arm to do as 
required, when a brother seizes it, and the Master says as follows: 

Master. ' Let this be a striking lesson to you, brother. You have 
sworn never to give this sign except in " actual distress," and I have 
done the same, which accounts for my giving it to you verbally; you 
was about to perjure yourself, when a brother stayed your arm and 
prevented you. Let this teach you to step forth and stay the arm of 
a brother, when about to commit any rash act; and to use your ut- 
most endeavors to keep him from falling into evil. Remember your 
Oath, brother ! ' — [A Candidate generally feels the full force of these 
remarks.] 

It is unnecessary to inform the reader of common discernment, that 
these letters, K. S. are the initials of the Key Stone. The Candidate 
is now placed on the opposite side of the Temple, with his face 
fronting the Master, who thus addresses him: 

Master. i Brother A. B., you have now arrived at a station attained 
but by few of your brethren,* and it is your embounden duty to guard 
against all immoralities in your life and conduct, which might pre- 
judice the world against our excellent Institution, or serve as an 
apology to your brethren of a lower degree, for following your ex- 
ample. You will alleviate the sufferings of the distressed, by con- 
tributing to their relief, if within your power, and if -not, by sympa- 
thizing with their distresses. I now have the pleasure to present you 
with the working tools of your profession. The working tools of a 
Mark-Master Mason, are the chisel and mallet, which are thus 
moralized : 

' The Chisel morally demonstrates the advantages of discipline and 
education. The mind, in its original state, like the diamond, is rude 
and unpolished; but as the effect of the chisel on the external coat 
soon presents to view the latent beauties of the diamond, so education 

* This charge has been handed down from very remote times, when, no doubt it was true. 
Very many are admitted to this degree in modern days— very many more that profit by th« 
•xcellent lessons they receive. 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 79 

discovers the latent virtues of the mind, and draws them forth to 
range the large field of matter and space, — to display the summit of 
human knowledge — our duty to God and to man. 

' The Mallet morally teaches to correct irregularities, and to reduce 
man to a proper level; so that by quiet deportment, he may, in the 
school of discipline, learn to be content. What the mallet is to the 
workman, enlightened reason is to the passions; it curbs ambition, 
depresses envy, it moderates anger, and it encourages good disposi- 
tions; whence arises among good Masons, that comely order, 

1 " Which nothing earthly gives, or can destroy— 

The soul's calm sun-shine, and the heart-felt joy." ' 

The Master now resumes his station in the East, and says: 
Master. ' Brother Master Overseer, you will take charge of the 
Candidate, and return with him to the Lodge in due season.' 

The Candidate is then conducted to the private room; his robe is 
taken off, and he puts on his own clothes — when he is again taken 
into the Lodge, and the Master, through the hands of the Master 
Overseer, presents him with a lamb-skin, or white leather apron, and 
the Overseer teaches him how to wear it, which is simply by tying it 
on, and so placing the strings- by its several corners as imperfectly to 
form the letters K. S., crossing each other. The Candidate is again 
placed on the platform with his face toward the Master, who gives 
him the following 

CHARGE. 

' Brother : I congratulate you on having been thought worthy of 
being promoted to this honorable degree of Masonry. Permit me to 
impress it on your mind, that your assiduity should ever be commen- 
surate with your duties, which become more and more extensive as 
you advance in Masonry. 

' The situation to which you are now promoted will draw upon you 
not only the scrutinizing eyes of the world at large, but those also 
of your brethren, on whom this degree of Masonry has not been con- 
ferred ; all will be justified in expecting your conduct and behavior to 
be such as may with safety be imitated. 

' In the honorable character of Mark-Master Mason, it is more 
particularly your duty to endeavor to let your conduct in the world, 
as well as in the Lodge, and among your brethren, be such as may 
stand the test of the Grand Overseer's Square ; that you may not, like 
the unfinished and imperfect work of the negligent and unfaithful 
of former times, be rejected and thrown aside, as unfit for "that 
spiritual building, that house not made with hands, eternal in the 
Heavens." 

' While such is your conduct, should misfortune assail you, should 
friends forsake you, should envy traduce your good name, and malice 
persecute you ; yet may you have confidence, that among Mark-Master 



80 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

Masons, you will find friends who will administer relief to your dis- 
tresses; and comfort your afflictions; ever bearing in mind, as a con- 
solation under all tne frowns of fortune, and as an encouragement to 
hope better prospects, that the stone which the builders rejected 
(possessing merits to them unknown) became the chief stone of the 
corner/ 

This concludes the Charge > and the Candidate is conducted down 
from the platform, and takes his seat; and this is the concluding 
ceremony at the conferring of this degree. If there is no further 
business before the Lodge, it is closed in the following manner: 

Master. Brother Jabal, are all things in preparation for the con- 
clusion of our work? 

Junior Overseer. All things are in preparation, Worshipful. 

Master. Then let every brother present mark well the entering in 
of the gate, with every going forth of the sanctuary. Observe your 
Master : 

The Master here descends from his station, and proceeds to the 
Temple, as in opening ; and having opened the golden door, while the 
brethren all kneel around in a circle, he recites the lengthy parable 
beginning with, i For the Kingdom of Heaven is like unto a man that 
is an householder, which went out early in the morning/ etc., which 
it is needless here to insert, as it can be found in Webb's ' Masonic 
Monitor/ page 91. The Master then holds up the Key Stone and 
says, ( He ; ' — his next brother says, ' Was ; ' — the next, ' Slain ; ' — 
and so on until the last word is said on which the letters on the Key 
Stone are the initials ; and if there be more than eight brethren present 
the one next to the seventh brother from the Master begins over again, 
and this method is continued, if there are fifty in the room, until 
each brother has pronounced a word. This is accordance with the 
idea held forth in the parable just referred to, concerning those who 
came in at the eleventh hour/ receiving as much wages as those who 
'have borne the burden and heat of the day. See Monitor, pages 91 
and 92. 

The brethren now all arise, and march around the Temple, until 
they have finished singing the Mark-Master's Song, which may also 
be found in the Monitor, pages 93 and 94. Having concluded the 
song, the Master says: 

Master. Brethren, we are about to separate from this Altar of 
Peace. May the extended wing of the Cherubims continually remind 
us of the unbounded latitude of Masonic Charity. May the Lord 
prosper our work, to the honor of his Holy Name. 

Response by the brethren: ' So mote it be!' 

Master. I now proclaim this Lodge duly and truly closed. May 
we all, my brothers, conduct ourselves as men and Masons, until we 
again assemble around this Altar of Peace. 

Response: ' So mote it be!' 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 81 

Here the ceremony closes, and the brethren disperse, except the 
Tyler, whose duty it is to take due care of the materials in and about 
the Temple, and to take the Temple itself to pieces, and place them in 
a box under lock and key, lest Master-Masons meeting in the same 
room on other nights, might see them, and make some improper dis- 
coveries. 

I might swell out the pages, by giving the Lectures of the several 
Degrees, but as they are merely explanatory of the ceremonies here 
related, a*nd of certain circumstances connected with the building of 
King Solomon's Temple, I shall only make this work what it purports 
to be, a ' key/ &c, wherewith may be unlocked the door of the 
Masonic Temple, through which any one may enter if they will only 
follow the rules here laid down. 

THE MEANS TO BE USED BY SUCH AS ARE NOT MASONS, TO GAIN ADMISSION INTO ANY LODGE OF MARK- 
MASONS ON THE FACE OF THE GLOBE. 

Nothing is more apt to make one's heart feel timorous, than to 
attempt to pass on his fellow-being a falsehood for a truth — or a base 
counterfeit coin for a genuine one; more especially 'when connected 
with the subject of this work, which has performed its midnight rites 
in secret conclave for centuries past, defying, as it were, the search- 
ing and scrutinizing eyes of the whole world ! This timorousness 
must be overcome before any one attempts to go into a Mark Lodge. 
He must take unto himself a resolution which cannot be shaken off 
at the door, otherwise he will quake and tremble, and have only his 
labor for his pains; but if he will follow exactly the rules here laid 
down, with boldness and resolution, no Mark Lodge on the Globe dare 
refuse him admission. 

On proceeding to the door of a Mark-Lodge, the Tyler will be found 
outside, with a naked sword as in the lower Degrees. After bidding 
the Tyler good evening, you can ask him on what Degree the Lodge 
is open. 

If the Mark-Master's, you can tell him you are a stranger, and 
would like to be examined. If you see an apron lying near, put it 
on with as much freedom as possible, and betray no fears or uneasi- 
ness — as this would excite suspicion. The Tyler will then give four 
knocks at the door, which will be answered by four 'from within, when 
it will open and the Tyler will whisper in the ear of the Junior Over- 
seer that i a * brother wishes to be examined.' The door will again 
close, and presently the three Overseers (sometimes but two) will 
come to you from another door, and conduct you into the private 
room where Candidates are first taken — when the following will be 
your course to pursue: Address yourself to either of the Overseers, 
and say, 'lama Mark-Master, and a stranger ; therefore I wish to 
be examined.' When the Overseer to whom you address yourself, will 
ask, ' Where was you made a Mark Master ? ; 

Applicant. In front of the Temnle, 



82 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

Overseer. What was between you and the Temple at the time? 

Applicant. The golden door. 

Overseer. Give me the grand hailing-sign of a Mark-Master. 

Applicant. That is beyond my power, at this time, brother. 

Overseer. Have you any other sign to dispose of ? 

Applicant. I have, with your assistance, brother. 

Overseer. How will you dispose of it? 

Applicant. By dividing the circle. 

Overseer. Proceed. 

[Here give the due-guard sign and clap once, when the Overseer 
will do the same; you will repeat, when he will also repeat, which 
will complete the four times.] 

Overseer. What do you call this sign, brother? 

Applicant. The due-guard sign and clap of a Mark-Master. 

Overseer. What further have you to convince me you are a Mark 
Master ? 

Applicant. A grip, brother. 

Overseer. Give me it. 

Applicant. [Taking him by the right-hand, and pressing your 
thumbnail into the upper joint of his third finger, i. e., the joint 
farthest from the nail] : This is the grip of a Mark-Master, 

Overseer. By what name is this grip designated, brother? 

Applicant. By a name similar in sound to the letters made in the 
air by Mark-Master in distress, accompanied by the grand hailing- 
sign. 

Overseer. Give me it, brother. 

Applicant. I will by dividing the square. 

Overseer. Proceed, brother. 

Applicant. OS. — Overseer. CHA. — Applicant. CHA. — Overseer. 
OS. — Applicant. CHAOS. — Overseer. Right, Brother Chaos, I greet 
you in the name of the Holy St. Mark, and all Mark-Masters through- 
out the globe. 

You will then be reported to the Lodge by the Overseers, as a regu- 
lar Mark-Master Mason, and introduced accordingly. On entering, 
you will proceed to the center of the floor, and give the due-guard, 
sign and clap in full, that the brethren may be also satisfied you are 
entitled to the privilege you have gained, and then take a seat. The 
examination by the Overseers seldom extends beyond what is here 
laid down — though in some instances it proceeds to the new name on 
the Key Stone, which by this time the reader can repeat as well as the 
brightest Mark-Master ; but he must always take especial care, should 
the Overseer touch on this subject, to utter but one of the words at a 
time, and insist on the next one being spoken by the Overseer, should 
he refuse, which is sometimes done, the more fully to test the quali- 
fications of a visiting brother. By adhering strictly to the rules here 
laid down, the reader, if sex or age does not oppose, can visit any Mark 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 83 

Lodge on the globe, of whatever country or nation. Oh learning the 
Lecture of this degree, it will be found very interesting and instruc- 
tive. It is divided into two sections. The first section explains the 
manner of convocating and opening a Mark-Master's Lodge. It 
teaches the stations and duties of the respective officers, and recapi- 
tulates the mystic ceremony of introducing a Candidate. In the 
second section, the Mark-Master is particularly instructed in the 
origin and history of this degree, and the indispensable obligation he 
is under to stretch forth his assisting hand to the relief of an indigent 
and worthy brother, to a certain and specified extent. The progress 
made in architecture, particularly in the reign of Solomon, is 
remarked ; the number of artists employed in building the Temple of 
Jerusalem, and the privileges they enjoyed, are specified; the mode 
of rewarding merit, and of punishing the guilty, are pointed out ; and 
the marks of distinction, which were conferred oh our ancient breth- 
ren, as the rewards of excellence, are particularly named. 

END OP FOURTH DEGREE. 



FIFTH DEGREE OF MASONRY. 

THE MODE AND MANNER OF CONFERRING THE DEGREE OF PAST-MASTER MASON ON A CANDIDATE, IT 
BEING THE FIFTH DEGREE OF MASONRY ; TOGETHER WITH THE MEANS TO BE USED BY SUCH AS 
ARE NOT MASONS, TO GAIN ADMISSION INTO ANY LODGE OF PAST-MASTERS ON THE FACE OF THE 
GLOBE. 

This degree will be found very uninteresting to the general reader, 
as it merely relates to the regulation of Lodges, the mode of laying 
corner-stones, installing officers, constituting new Lodges, ceremonies 
observed at funerals, consecrations, &c, &c. ; the principal part of 
which may be found in Webb's Monitor, from page 94 to 145. 

As it would be folly to present to the public what is already before 
them, I shall merely give the manner in which this degree is con- 
ferred, which will enable any one to visit a Lodge of Past-Masters, 
and seek such further elucidation of the subject as his curiosity may 
prompt. This degree is conferred on every Master of a Lodge pre- 
vious to his installation. 

A candidate about to take this degree, is conducted into the Lodge 
without ceremony, and caused to kneel before the tabernacle, with 
his hands resting on the Holy Bible, in the following manner; he 
lays his left hand on the left page, and his right hand on the right 
page, letting the end of the fore-finger of each hand touch each 
other, with the thumbs pointing in a straight line across the page, 
toward each other (i. e., the way the lines run in the book), and 
their ends also touching each other; which forms a perfect triangle 
(with the exception of a slight curve in the middle of the base, where 
the thumbs meet) as any one may readily discover, by placing his 
hands in that situation. In order to form as perfect a triangle as 
possible, the fingers adjoining the foremost ones, i. e., the' second 



84 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

fingers, and the two longest on tfie hands, are kept close to the fere 
ones, from the roots to the ends, and the ends of these longest (which 
reach somewhat further than the fore ones), must be suffered to 
barely graze each other, taking care also to press the ends of the 
thumbs together until the end of each nail meets. In this situation 
the Master administers the following 

OATH. 

' In the name of God, and the Holy Prophets, I solemnly swear, 
that I will recognize no brother as Past-Master, except he first prove" 
himself such by the triangle of truth; and that I will keep invio- 
late the sign and words of a Past-Master, except in the presence ©f 
those only who are legally in possession of the same, and then only, 
except by the Triangle of Truth. In the name of God, and the Holy 
Prophets ! ' 

This oath being taken, the Candidate is told to arise, when the 
Master addresses him thus: 

{ Brother — previous to your investiture, it is necessary that you 
should signify your assent to those ancient charges and regulations 
which point out the duty of a Master of a Lodge/ 

The Master then reads a summary of the ancient charges to the 
Candidate, as follows: 

' I. You agree to be a good man and true, and strictly to obey the 
moral law. 

' II. You agree to be a peaceable subject, and cheerfully to conform 
to the laws of the country in which you reside. 

i III. You promise not to be concerned in plots and conspiracies 
against government, but patiently to submit to the decisions of the 
supreme legislature. 

' IV. You agree to pay a proper respect to the civil magistrate, to 
work diligently, live creditably, and act honorably by all men. 

i V. You agree to hold in veneration the original rulers and patrons 
of the Order of Masonry, and their regular successors, supreme and 
subordinate according to their stations; and to submit to the awards 
and resolutions of your brethren when convened, in every case con- 
sistent with the constitutions of the Order. 

' VI. You agree to avoid private piques and quarrels, and to guard 
against intemperance and excess. 

' VII. You agree to be cautious in carriage and behavior, courteous 
to your brethren, and faithful to your Lodge. 

' VIII. You promise to respect genuine brethren, and to discounte- 
nance impostors and all dissenters from the original plan of Masonry. 

' IX. You agree to promote the general good of society, to cultivate 
the social virtues, and to propagate the knowledge of the arts. 

' X. You promise to pay homage to the Grand Master for the time 
being and to his officers, when duly installed ; and strictly to conform 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY 85 

to every edict of the Grand Lodge, or general assembly of Masons, 
that is not subversive of the principles and ground-work of Masonry. 

f XI. You admit that it is not in the power of any man, or body of 
men, to make innovations in the body of Masonry. 

1 XII. You 'promise a regular attendance on the committees and 
communications of the Grand Lodge, on receiving proper notice; and 
to pay attention to all the duties of Masonry, on convenient occasions. 

' XIII. You admit that no new Lodge shall be formed without per- 
mission of the Grand Lodge; and that no countenance be given to 
-any irregular Lodge, or to any person clandestinely initiated therein, 
being contrary to the ancient charges of the Order. 

' XIV. You admit that no person can be regularly made a Mason 
in or admitted a member of, any regular Lodge, without previous 
notice and due inquiry into his character. 

i XV. You agree that no visitors shall be received into your Lodge 
without due examination, and producing proper vouchers of their 
having been initiated into a regular Lodge. 

After giving the foregoing charges, the Master addresses the Can- 
didate as follows: 

' Brother A. B. — Do you submit to these charges, and promise to 
support these regulations, as Past-Masters have done in all ages 
before you ? ' 

Having signified his cordial submission, the Master continues: 

( Brother — In consequence of your cheerful conformity to the 
charge and regulations of the Order, you are now intrusted with the 
sign and words of this degree, which were established by our three 
ancient Grand Masters at Jerusalem a short time previous to the 
completion of the Temple, with the fullest confidence that you will 
keep and preserve the same inviolate.* 

The Master here gives the sign, which is done by placing his hands 
in the position in which they were when the oath was taken, and 
raising them so as to let the ends of the thumbs, where they meet, 
rest about on the middle of the nose, and the two ends of the fore- 
fingers that meet, on the head directly over the forehead; at the 
same time looking through the triangle thus formed, at the lower 
angles, at the Candidate, and pronouncing the words t triangle 

OF TRUTH.' 

The Candidate being taught this, the Master says: 

' This, brother, is the Sign, and these the words, of a Past-Master, 

which you have sworn never to give or receive, except by the Triangle 

of Truth, which is the manner in which you receive them; nor then, 

except when only in the presence of Past-Masters.' 

The Master now forms the triangle again, and raising his hands as 

described above (the Candidate being taught the same), looks through 

at the Candidate, and says: 

* By a reference to the Monitor, page 114, it will be seen that this language is nearly the 
same as that used at the installation of a Master of % Lodire. 



86 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

' Brother — I now behold you within the Triangle of Truth— and 
may the All-Seeing Eye ever thus find you/ 

The Master then takes his station, and delivers a charge almost the 
same as the one addressed to the Master at his Installation, which 
may be found in the Monitor, pages 121 and 122, and which it is 
needless here to transcribe. The Candidate is then presented with a 
Triangle, which is his peculiar insignia, and takes his seat. There 
being no other business, the Lodge is then closed. 

This degree is conferred upon many who have not taken the Mark 
Degree, as all Masters of Lodges (I now mean Master's Lodges), 
must receive this prior to their installation; but no one can progress 
farther than this degree without first taking' the Mark : and in fact 
this degree seems more properly to belong to the lower degrees than 
to the higher ones — and I am inclined to think, that, anciently, this 
was counted the Fourth Degree, although I have no Masonic authority 
for so believing for a single second to such a belief, that I am aware of 
The Lecture of this degree is divided into five sections, the leading 
features of which may be seen in the Monitor, pages 96 to 145. 



THE MEANS TO BE USED BY SUCH AS ARE NOT MASONS TO GAIN ADMISSION INTO ANY LODGE OF PAST- 
MASTERS ON THE FACE OF THE GLOBE. 

It is a very easy matter to enter a Lodge of Past-Masters, if you 
have the sign correctly, as that is generally all that is required, 
Sometimes the words are resorted to, and lest the reader might not 
fairly understand the ceremony to be performed, I shall here lay it 
down so plainly that he cannot fail to understand it. 

You will proceed to the door of the Lodge, which you will find 
guarded by the Tyler with a drawn sword, as in the Mark Degree, 
and on requesting to be admitted, he will give five knocks at the door, 
which will be answered by the same number from within; when the 
door will be opened, and the Tyler will whisper your request to the 
brother who opens it, when the door will again be closed. During 
the interval, you can ask the Tyler on what degree the Lodge is 
open, and if he says the Fifth, or Past-Master's, you will proceed as 
follows, when the person sent out to examine you, has conducted you 
into the private room, as stated in the last degree: 

Applicant. I am a Past-Master, and wish to enter this Lodge of 
Past-Masters. 

Past-Master. How am I to know you are such? 

Applicant. By this. [Here place your hands before you as when 
the oath was taken.] 

Past-Master. Have you anything more, brother? 

Applicant. I have. [Here raise your hands, as before stated, and 
looking through the triangle, the Mason will say], 

Past-Master. What is that, brother? 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 87 

Applicant. The Triangle of Truth. [Here bring your hands down 
with a flap on each thigh.] 

The Mason will then be fully satisfied, and introduce you into the 
Lodge, when you will proceed to the middle of the floor and give the 
sign above-named, that the brethren may be convinced of your claim; 
but by all means avoid pronouncing the words at the time. You will 
barely raise your hands to your eyes, preserving the triangle, and then 
letting them drop on your thighs with a flap, take a seat. 



SIXTH DEGREE OF MASONRY. 

THE MODE AND MANNER OF CONFERRING THE DEGREE OF MOST EXCELLENT MASTER-MASON ON A 
CANDIDATE, IT BEING THE SIXTH DEGREE OF MASONRY ; TOGETHER WITH THE MEANS TO BE USED 
BY SUCH AS ARE NOT MASONS, TO GAIN ADMISSION INTO ANY LODGE OF MOST EXCELLENT MASTERS 
ON THE FACE OF THE GLOBE. 

Anciently, none but the meritorious and praiseworthy; none but 
those who through diligence and industry had progressed far toward 
perfection; none but those who had been seated in the Oriental 
Chair * by the unanimous suffrage of their brethren — were admitted 
to this Degree of Masonry. In its original establishment, when the 
Temple of Jerusalem was finished, and the Fraternity celebrated the 
cap-stone with great joy, it is demonstrable that none but those who 
had proved themselves complete masters of their profession were 
admitted to this honor, and indeed the duties incumbent on every 
Mason who is accepted and acknowledged as a Most Excellent Master, 
are such as render it indispensable that he should have a perfect 
knowledge of all the preceding degrees. 

A Lodge of Most Excellent Masters is opened as follows: The 
brethren form themselves into an oblong square around the Temple 
(on which is placed a golden tabernacle, with staves by which it can 
be carried), as in the Mark Degree, all standing and uncovered: when 
the Most Excellent Master presiding says : i The earth is the Lord's 
and the fullness thereof; the world, and they that dwell therein/ 

The brother next him says : ' For he has founded it upon the seas, 
and established it upon the floods/ 

The next brother proceeds : ' Who shall ascend into the hill of the 
Lord ? and who shall stand in his holy place ? ' , 

The next brother replies : ' He that hath clean hands, and a pure 
heart; who hath not lifted up his soul unto vanity, nor sworn deceit- 
fully/ 

Next brother : i He shall receive the blessing from the Lord, and 
righteousness from the God of his salvation/ 

Next brother : ' This is the generation of them that seek him, that 
seek thy face, Jacob/ 

* The Oriental Chair was the one used by King Solomon when he presided as Grand-Master, 
which was lost at the destruction of Jerusalem. We learn by a Masonic tradition contained 
in the lecture of this degree, that "this chair was of massive gold with cushions fringed with 
silver ; and was large enough to contain three persons. 



88 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

Next brother: ' Selah.' 

Next brother ; ' Lift up your heads, ye gates, — (there the golden 
door is opened), — ' and be ye lifted up/ — [here two of the brethren 
raise the golden tabernacle by its staves,* about as high as their 
heads], — 'ye everlasting doors, and the King of Glory shall come in.' 
[Here the brethren lower the tabernacle.] 

Next brother : ' Who is this King of Glory ? ' 

Next : ' The Lord strong and mighty, the Lord mighty in battle.' 

Next brother : ' Lift up your heads, ye gates, even lift them up, 
— (here they again raise the tabernacle), — ' ye everlasting doors, and 
the King of Glory shall come in.' 

Next: 'Who is this King of Glory?' 

Next brother : ' The Lord of Hosts, he is the King of Glory.' 

The brethren all together : ' Selah ! ' 

The tabernacle is now replaced on the Temple, and the Most Excel- 
lent Master proclaims the Lodge open, when the golden door is closed, 
and the brethren take their seats. There is solemnity in the ceremony 
of opening this Lodge, which it is impossible to convey on paper. A 
reverential awe pervades the breast of every one present, no matter 
how often he may have assisted in the ceremony. 

If a Candidate has been balloted for, and is in waiting, he is con- 
ducted into a private room by two brethren, when a brother says the 
following : 

' I was glad when they said unto me, Let us go into the house of 
the Lord.' — (During the time the brother is repeating these passages, 
the other brother is taking the clothing from off the Candidate.) — 
i Our feet shall stand within thy gates, Jerusalem. Jerusalem is 
builded as a city that is compact together; whither the tribes go up, 
the tribes of the Lord, unto the testimony of Israel, to give thanks 
unto the name of the Lord. Pray for the peace of Jerusalem ; they 
shall prosper that love thee. Peace be within thy walls, and pros- 
perity within thy palaces. For my brethren and companions' sake, 
I will now say, Peace be within thee because of the house of the Lord 
our God, I will seek thy good.' 

By this time (as the brother speaks very slow, making sufficient 
pauses, between each sentence to give the other brother time), the 
Candidate is deprived of all his clothing except his shirt, and in this 
situation he is conducted into the Lodge, when the Most Excellent 
Master addresses him as follows: 

( Brother A. B., — You are for the sixth time within the walls of our 
sacred tabernacle, and it becomes ^necessary for you to take upon you 
an Oath, before you can proceed further. " Who shall ascend into 
the hill cf the Lord? and who shall stand in his holy place? He 

* The ark, while it was ambulatory with the Tabernacle, was carried by staves on the 
shoulders of the Levites. These staves were overlaid with gold, and put through golden 
rings made for them. Prid., v. 1, p. 302. 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 89 

that hath clean hands, and a pure heart: who hath not lifted up hi? 
soul unto vanity, nor sworn deceitfully." ' 

The Candidate is then conducted to the altar, caused to kneel on a 
cushion with both knees, resting his hands on the Bible, the same as 
in the last degree, except instead of permitting the ends of his fore- 
fingers and thumbs to barely touch each other, they must now be 
crossed : i. e., the fore-finger of the right hand, at the first joint, must 
cross the fore-finger of the left hand at the first joint — (the joint 
nearest to the nail) ; and the thumb of the right hand, at the first 
joint, must cross the thumb of the left hand at the first joint ; keeping 
the hands as flat on the book as possible, as in the Past Degree; and 
keeping the other three fingers of each hand as close together as he 
can, and as far as they can be stretched from the two fore-fingers, 
which are crossed. This forms a figure which is represented on all 
escutcheons of Royal Arch Masonry. In this situation the M. E. 
Master administers the following 

OATH. 

* In the name of God, and the Holy Prophets, I solemnly swear, 
that the secrets connected with the Degree of Most Excellent Master- 
Mason, which I have received, am about to, or shall hereafter receive, 
I will keep inviolate within my own breast, except I impart them to 
such as are lawfully entitled to the same. Further, that I will use 
all amicable means within my power to save a worthy brother of this 
degree from injury, either from himself or any other person. I also 
swear that I will not give the Grand Hailing-sign of distress, or 
words of a Most Excellent Master, to any being in any known world 
without first satisfying myself that such a person is as lawfully 
entitled to the same as I myself am, except in case of great distress. 
I furthermore swear, in the name of God, and the Holy Prophets, 
that I will never suffer to be wronged or injured, if within my power 
to prevent, the wife, sister, mother or daughter of a brother of this 
degree. In the name of God, and the Holy Prophets/ 

The Oath being finished, the Candidate is ordered to arise, when 
he is placed in front of the Temple, and the M. E. Master addresses 
him thus: 

' Brother, you again behold the outward sanctuary of King Solo- 
mon's Temple. May the Lord prepare your heart to feel the beauties 
within.' 

The Candidate is here caused to kneel, when the Master opens the 
golden door, when the inside of the Temple seems as dark as Egypt, 
the lights having been previously extinguished by a brother — when 
the M. E. Master kneels, and proceeds as follows: 

" Then said Solomon, The Lord hath said that he would dwell in 
thick darkness. But I have built an house of habitation for thee, 
and a place for thy dwelling forever." "And he stood before the 



90 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

altar of the Lord, in the presence of all the congregation of Israel, 
and spread forth his hands. (For Solomon had made a brazen scaf- 
fold of five cubits long, and five cubits broad, and three cubits high, 
and had set it in the midst of the court.) Now then, Lord God 
of Israel, let thy word be verified, which thou hast spoken unto thy 
servant David. (But will God in very deed dwell with men on earth? 
Behold, heaven and the heaven of heavens cannot contain thee; how 
much less this house which I have builded!) Then Solomon again 
spread forth his hands, and said, Let thine eyes, Lord, be open 
upon this house day and night, and hearken unto the prayer which 
thy servant prayeth toward this place." ' 

The Most Excellent Master continues reciting several lengthy pas- 
sages, which may be found in the' Masonic Monitor, from page 148 to 
152, which it is useless here to insert, except such particular parts as 
serve to illustrate this part of the ceremony. He at length arrives 
at the following passage: 

' " Now when Solomon had made an end of praying, THE FIRE 
CAME DOWN FROM HEAVEN/' ' (here a brother applies a light 
to a train prepared for the purpose, unperceived by the Candidate, 
which instantly begins to illuminate the Temple — and the Master 
proceeds.) — " i and consumed the burnt-offering and the sacrifices; 
and THE GLORY OF THE LORD FILLED THE HOUSE ! " ' 
By this time the Temple is filled with a pure blaze of flaming light, 
it having been prepared during the day with combustible materials 
for the purpose. The Most Excellent Master continues : i " and the 
Priests could not enter into the house of the Lord, because the glory 
of the Lord had filled the Lord's house." ' 

Here the Most Excellent Master and Candidate arise, and walk 
around to the North side of the Temple, when such illuminated fig- 
ures are presented to their sight as it is impossible here to describe 
or enumerate. (The brethren maintain a profound silence during 
all this time.) On the South side of the Temple are seen brilliant 
representations of the implements pertaining to the lower degrees of 
Masonry, together with all the adornments of that side of the original 
Temple at Jerusalem, as described in the Scriptures; with thousands 
of other brilliancies too numerous even to name, and which seem 
more of another world than this. On the West side, the setting sun 
is descending behind the hills, in all the splendor of a meridian noon- 
day, and other curiosities indescribable. Getting round to the North, 
scarcely a gleam of light penetrates through this side of the Temple ! 
This is of Masonic ingenuity, and is well understood by all who have 
studied well the three first degrees. 

In front of the Temple, where the golden door opens, which faces 
the East, is seen the reservoir containing the materials which give 
this brilliant light; and by the time the Candidate arrives in front 
[the Master explains many of the illuminations as they pass around], 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 91 

this source or fountain head appears partially exhausted,* and the 
light becomes partially dim, when the Most Excellent Master addresses 
the Candidate as follows: 

' Brother, you discover that the light of Divine love is fading : let 
the Divine fire of heaven expand your heart, and revive it/ 

After a momentary pause as if waiting for the operation to take 
effect on the Candidate (who cannot refrain from certain feelings of 
his inward divinity during this time), the light resumes its former 
lustre — which is done by the hand of a brother, who governs a secret 
spring, wholly unobserved by the Candidate. 

During these ceremonies, which cannot be well described, much less 
made to appear solemn on paper (but which are in their proper places 
as solemn and imposing as human ceremonies can be made), the 
brethren maintain almost a breathless silence. 

The brethren, being all assembled around the Temple, and while 
the illumination is in its greatest splendor, sing the Most Excellent 
Master's Song, accompanied with flutes and other instruments of 
music; at the same time marching round, and yet preserving the 
oblong square in which they first formed. As this song is in the 
Mason's Monitor, I shall only insert such parts of it as serve to illus- 
trate this part of the ceremony. Having sung the three first verses, 
while marching round the Temple, the Candidate and Most Excellent 
Master being now in front of the golden door, they all kneel with 
their faces toward the Temple (which is in their center), and sing 
the last verse, as follows: 

1 Almighty Jehovah, ' Preside at our meetings, 

Descend now, and fill Assist us to find 

This Lodge with thy glory, True pleasure in teaching 
Our hearts with good-will ! Good-will to mankind.' 

chorus. • Thy wisdom inspired the great Institution, 

Thy strength shall support it, till nature expire ; 
Aud when the creation shall fall into ruin. 
Its beauty shall rise, through the midst op the fire. 

At this instant the materials are again replenished t by means of 
the private spring, when a blaze bursts forth, if possible, ten times 
more brilliant than any preceding it, and by means of a pulley held 
ready by a brother, a part of the roof of the Temple is raised up, 
when the blaze flames out with such a vivid brightness, that the 
brethren involuntarily cover their eyes with their hands. The blaze 

* The Jews had a sacred fire which came down from heaven upon their altar of burnt- 
offerings, which they did there ever after, until the distruction of Jerusalem by the Chaldeans, 
inextinguishably maintain : and with this fire only were all their sacrifices and oblations 
made ; and Nadab and Abihu were punished with death for offering incense to God with 
other fire. (See Lightfoot's Temple Service.) 

t The holy fire first descended upon the altar in the tabernacle at the con«ecrating of Aaron 
and his sons to the priesthood, and afterward it descended anew upon the altar in the Temple 
of Solomon, at the consecrating of that Temple. And then it was constantly fed and main- 
tained by the priest, day and night, without ever suffering it to go out. 



92 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

sometimes reaches nearly to the ceilingf and perfumes of the most 
heavenly fragrance imaginable are emitted, consisting of all the dif- 
ferent incenses, and odoriferous drugs that can be procured. In 
truth, one might easily imagine himself in Elysium. 

By degrees the light diminishes in brightness, and the brethren 
uncover their faces and rise, when the Most Excellent Master addresses 
the Candidate: 

' Brother, you have seen a faint imitation of " the fire which 
cometh. down from God out of heaven/' and I beseech you to permit 
the fire of divine love to burn with equal fervor continually in your 
own heart. Let your affections and thoughts continually ascend unto 
the Lord as a sweet-smelling savor, thereby preparing for yourself a 
crown of glory, eternal in the heavens ! ' 

The brethren now repeat the first verse of the Most Excellent 
Master's Song, as follows: 

4 All hall to the morning * The Cap-Stone is finished 

That bids us rejoice ; Our labor is o'er ; 

The Temple's completed, The sound of the gavel 

Exalt high each voice ; Shall hail us no more.' 

Here the Key Stone is brought forward by a brother, and replaced 
in the Temple between the golden cherubims (it having been removed 
previously to opening the Lodge), the golden door is closed, and thus 
close this part of the ceremony. (I might have previously stated 
that the insides of the blocks of which the Temple is built, are 
thoroughly lined with brass or copper plates, to prevent their taking 
fire.) The M. E. Master now says: 

' I shall now present you with the words and signs of this degree. 
The due-guard sign is given by holding your hands flat before you 
thus — letting your right thumb cross your left at the first joint, and 
your fore-finger crossing your left at the same; keeping your other 
three fingers of each hand as far from them as possible. You wih 
then raise them perpendicularly before your face (with their backa 
almost touching your face), then let them separate and drop by your 
side with a flap. This is the due-guard sign, and alludes to the situ- 
ation of your hand when you took the Oath. 

' The grand hailing-sign of this degree or sign of distress, is this — 
(here the Master covers his eyes with his left hand, with his thumb in 
a perpendicular position over his left temple) — and has allusioii to 
the way and manner in which you protected your eyes froxii the 
bright effulgence, when " the glory of the Lord filled the house." 
Accompanying this sign, while your eyes are yet covered in case of 

t It is well known that a few years since the Exchange Coffee House was burnt down in 
Boston, and none but Masons of this degree know to this day the manner in which it caught. 
It was given out that a party who had been playing cards, had left a candle burning |n one of 
the rooms, by which it was communicated, but the truth is, a Chapter was held in an upper 
Toom, and had arrived at this very crisis in the ceremony of conferring this degree, when the 
fire first took ; so the manner in which it originated no longer remains a mystery. 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 93 

great distress you are allowed to pronounce the words, " and the 
glory of the lord filled the house ! " These were the expres- 
sions made use of in ancient times, in the Hebrew language ; but since 
Christianity has become established upon the earth, in many Lodges 
they teach the Candidate the following in lieu thereof : " Eloi ! Eloi ! 
La Ma Sabacthinai ? " or which is the same thing, in English, — 
My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me ! " Either of these 
expressions will immediately be recognized if there be a brother of 
this degree within hearing, who will instantly fly to your relief. This 
last sign, and these words, brother, you will remember you have 
solemnly sworn to give only to such as are lawfully entitled to the 
same, except when you are in great distress/ 

The Candidate is then conducted into the private room, and re- 
clothed. The Most ' Excellent Master takes his station, and the 
brethren are seated. In due time the Candidate is re-introduced, 
and conducted before the Most Excellent Master in the East, who 
delivers the following 

CHARGE. 

' Brother : Your admittance to this degree of Masonry is a proof 
of the good opinion the brethren of this Lodge entertain of your 
Masonic abilities. Let this consideration induce you to be careful of 
forfeiting, by misconduct and inattention to our rules, that esteem 
which has raised you to the rank you now possess. 

' It is one of your great duties, as a Most Excellent Master, 
to dispense light and truth to the uninformed Mason; and I need 
not remind you of the impossibility of complying with this obligation 
without possessing an accurate acquaintance with the lectures of each 
degree. 

' If you are not already completely conversant in all the degrees 
heretofore conferred on you, remember that an indulgence, prompted 
by a belief that you will apply yourself with double diligence to make 
yourself so, has induced the brethren to accept you. 

' Let it therefore be your unremitting study to acquire such a 
degree of knowledge and information as shall enable you to discharge 
with propriety the various duties incumbent on you^ and to preserve 
unsullied the title now conferred upon you of a Most Excellent 
Master/ 

The Candidate then takes a seat, and the Lodge is closed with 
nearly the same ceremonies as those performed at opening; which, 
however unimportant or trifling they may appear on paper, are of 
that sublime and imposing nature which cannot fail to soften, at 
least for the time, the stoutest heart. 

The lecture of this degree will be found very interesting, by such 
as see proper to visit a Lodge and hear it. The different sections 
bring to light many matters connected with the completion of the 



94 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

Temple at Jerusalem, which have only been preserved from oblivion 
in the faithful breasts of Most Excellent Masters. Among other 
things not related in the Scriptures, we learn that at the time ' when 
Solomon had made an end of praying/ and when ' the fire came down 
from heaven/ one of the head workmen of the Temple who was 
present, was so struck with the sublimity of the scene, and his mind 
being influenced with such a reverential awe, that he was translated, 
the same as Elijah ! It may seem strange that his disappearance 
was not noticed by the surrounding thousands, and the circumstance 
handed down in the Scriptures; but the probability is that the spec- 
tators were so awed by the grandeur of the scene, that they took no 
note of aught else that transpired. The workmen of the Temple all 
stood in one group, and this brother was seen to ascend until fairly 
out of sight. » 



THE MEANS TO BE USED BY SUCH AS ARE NOT MASONS, TO GAIN ADMISSION INTO ANY LODGE OF MOST 
EXCELLENT MASTERS ON THE FACE OF THE GLOBE. 

The examination at the door of a Most Excellent Master's Lodge 
is very short, and will soon test the qualifications of a visiting brother. 
On making your request known to the Tyler, as in the last degree, 
two brothers will be sent out to examine you; and being conducted 
into the private room, you will say — (addressing yourself to one of 
them) — 

' All hail, Most Excellent Masters.' 

M. E. Master. All hail.* 

Applicant. I am a Most Excellent Master Mason, and claim admis- 
sion into this Lodge. 

M. E. Master. Prove yourself such, and you will be received and 
acknowledged. 

Applicant. What would you have, brother? 
1 M, E. Master. . A sign. 

Applicant. — -(Here give the due-guard sign, by placing your hands 
flat before you, with their backs up, as when you took the oath ; with 
the right thumb crossing the left at the joint nearest the nail, and the 
right fore-finger crossing the same joint of the left fore-finger, as 
explained before; then bring your hands up before your face in this 
situation, so that your fingers — except the two fore ones — point 
directly upward ; then let them .separate and drop by your side, with 
a flap.) 

M. E. Master. What sign is that, brother? 

Applicant. The due-guard sign of a Most Excellent Master. 

M. E. Master. When did that sign originate, brother? 

Applicant. When the first Most Excellent Master took his oath. 

M. E. Master. To what does it allude, brother? 

* Those acquainted withthe writings of Shakspeare, will at once discover that he was a 
Mason. Not only does he show it in Macbeth, but his Hamlet is full of it. Ghost. Mark 
me I ' ' Safe-bind safe-find me.' etc. 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 95 

Applicant. To the manner in which my hands were placed, when I 
was qualifying myself to take upon me this degree. 

M. E. Master. Have you any other sign, brother ? 

Applicant. I have, Most Excellent. 

M. E. Master. Give me it, brother. 

Applicant. I cannot, at this time, Most Excellent. 

M. E. Master. I am satisfied, Most Excellent Brother, that you are 
entitled to admission. 

You will then be introduced, when you will proceed to the middle 
of the floor, and give the due-guard sign and take a seat. 

END OF SIXTH DEGREE. 



SEVENTH DEGREE OF MASONRY. 

THE MODE AND MANNER OF CONFERRING THE DEGREE OF ROY\L ARCH MASON ON A CANDIDATE, IT 
BEING THE SEVENTH, AND LAST DEGREE OF ANCIENT MASONRY; TOGETHER WITH THE MEANS TO BE 
USED BY SUCH AS ARE NOT MASONS, TO GAIN ADMISSION INTO ANY CHAPTER OF ROYAL ARCH MASONS 
ON THE FACE OF THE GLOBE. 

' This degree is indescribably more august, sublime, and important 
than all which precede it ; and is the summit and perfection of ancient 
Masonry. It impresses on our minds a conviction of the being and 
existence of a Supreme Deity, without beginning of days, or end of 
years; and reminds us of the reverence due to his holy name. 

' This degree brings to light many essentials of the Craft, which 
were for the space of four hundred and seventy years buried in dark- 
ness ; and without a knowledge of which the Masonic character cannot 
be complete. 

I feel myself more than ever as standing upon 'holy ground,' now 
I approach this degree — this Ne Plus Ultra of Masonry; and almost 
incompetent to perform the task before me: yet, if I do not rehearse 
all the ceremonies introduced in this degree (as I necessarily must 
not, as they of themselves would fill this work), I shall present the 
main particulars and such arcana as will enable any one who chooses 
to visit any Chapter on the Globe, when he can see with his own eyes, 
and hear with his own ears, the things here related, together with 
various other matters which are omitted. 

The Chapter being assembled, the three head officers take their 
stations, which are the same as the Master and Wardens in a Lodge. 
These three officers are, the High Priest, King, and Scribe. The 
High Priest is clad in a blue robe, and is seated in the East under a 
canopy, with a scepter in his hand; the King is stationed in the West, 
and wears a purple robe; and the Scribe in the South, wearing a 
robe of the deepest scarlet. The Captain of the Host, Principal 
Sojourner, and other officers, all have clothing peculiar to their 
stations, and are promiscuously disposed around the Chapter room, 
when the High Priest recites the following passage: 

' Now we command you, brethren, that ye withdraw yourselves from 



96 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

every brother that walked disorderly, and not after the tradition 
which ye received of us. For yourselves know how ye ought to follow 
us, for we behaved ourselves not disorderly among you. Neither did 
we eat any man's bread for naught, but wrought with labor and 
travail day and night, that we might not be chargeable to any of you. 
Not because we have not power, but to make ourselves an example 
unto you to follow us. For even when we were with you, this, we 
commanded you, that if any would not work, neither should he eat; 
for we hear there are some who walk among you disorderly, working 
not at all, but are busy-bodies. Now, them that are such, we com- 
mand and exhort, that with quietness they work, and eat their own 
bread. But ye, brethren, be ye not weary in well-doing. And if any 
man obey not our word, note that man, and have no company with 
him, that he may be ashamed. Yet count him not as an enemy, but 
admonish him as a brother. Now, the Lord of peace himself give 
you peace always. The salutation of Paul, with mine own hand, 
which is the token; so I write/ 

Having concluded, the Companions all kneel, when the H. P. 
proceeds : i Great Architect of the Universe, we again appear in thy 
holy presence, with a sincere desire that our hearts may be free from 
guile. Purify, Lord, our inward tabernacle, and grant that our 
works may redound to the glory of thy Holy Name.' Response: [ So 
mote it be! ' 

The H. P., King and Scribe now descend from their several sta- 
tions, and approach a New Temple which is placed on the middle of 
the floor, and about four times the size of the one used in the Mark 
and M. E. Master's degrees, when the H. P. repeats the following: 

' " For thus saith the Lord of Hosts, Yet once, it is a little while, 
and I will shake the heavens, and the earth, and the sea, and the dry 
land: and I will shake all nations, and the desire of all nations shall 
come, and I will fill this house with glory. The silver is mine, and 
the gold is mine. The glory of this latter house shall be greater than 
of the former, and in this place will I give peace. Moreover, the word 
of the Lord came unto me, saying, The hands of Zerubbabel have 
laid the foundation of this house, his hands shall also finish it; and 
thou shalt know that the Lord of Hosts hath sent me unto you. For 
who hath despised the day of small things? for they shall rejoice, 
and shall see the plummet in the hands of Zerubbabel with those 
seven."' (This is an ancient prophecy, and has allusion to the 
rebuilding of the second Temple, after the destruction of the former 
one, which is represented to have taken place in this degree.) 

The Companions now move in solemn procession around the Tem- 
ple, until the H. P. has delivered a lengthy passage from the Script- 
ures, at the end of which, he proclaims the chapter open, when the 
officers take their stations and the Companions their seats. 

The Chapter being opened; and a Candidate in waiting, he is con- 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 97 

lucted into Vhe private apartment by three of the Companions, and 
divested of all his clothing, save his shirt, when one of them says, 
' Naked * you came into the world, and naked you must retutrn/ He 
then desires him to take off his shirt, and put on ' The apron of fig- 
leaves.^ The apron is lying before the Candidate, and the three 
Companions having turned their backs, he strips off his shirt and 
girds on the apron as requested. A pair of oriental slippers are then 
put on his feet, which completes his preparation for this sublime 
degree. 

These slippers are somewhat curious, and as many will read this 
work who will never visit a Chapter to see them, particularly females, 
I shall attempt a partial description of them. They are woven to- 
gether without a seam, in modern Chapters, from the bark of the 
elm tree, split to about the size of common stocking yarn. It is pre- 
sumable that anciently they were manufactured from the bark of the 
same tree that afforded the wrappers in which Egyptian mummies 
were enshrouded and embalmed: but this is mere conjecture, although 
there is no good reason to disbelieve it. The fact that anciently the 
same tree produced clothing for a mummy, and slippers for Royal 
Arch Masons, is further established by the following extract from an 
ancient work on the i Museum of Antiquities ' at Rome : 

i One one shelfe in thee corner of this roome laved a show or slippur 
madde of some verie finne barkk of tree, which was verie and ex- 
treemlie finne, and madde entyrelie wholle without seame or linning, 
and was wranghte verie curiouslie and witth mutch ingenuousnesse. 
They sayed ytt had belonnged ancientlie to somme King who had 
been slayne in battel, and was of sutch texture as formerlie they 
wraughte to enshroude sutch men of greate valyor that ytt was 
deemed meete to imbamme in theire toombes/ &c. 

These slippers are much longer than the feet, and are peaked at 
the toes. The heel of each forms two right angles of a square, and is 
not circular as other shoes. They are ornamented all over so as 
partially to resemble the Indian moccasins, which are decorated with 
"quills of the porcupine, but with this difference: the slippers used in 
a Chapter are ornamented with gold and silver tinsel, forming the 
ancient hieroglyphics of the Egyptians, which some pretend to under- 
stand and explain; whereas the Indian moccasin is merely ornamented 
in the ordinary drapery style. But to our subject. 

* Man, before the transgression, was naked, and yet not ashamed. Gen. ii. 25. But after, 
he knew he was naked. Gen. iii. 7-11. Saul being naked, prophesied with the prophets. 
1 Sam. xix. 24. 

t This apron is composed of real leaves, and is intended to represent the one worn by Adam 
in the garden of Eden, after he had partaken of the forbidden fruit. It reaches entirely 
around tr'm, and descends nearly to the knees, so that no very material breach of modesty is 
made : and yet, what modest lady (who is often heard railing against the Masons for their 
not admitting her sex), would willingly be present at this ceremony ; much less have it per* 
formed on herself ! In my travels among the Indians, I have seen whole nations duly pre- 
pared, in their ordinary dress, to be made Royal Arch Masons, excepting the substitution of 
cloth or leather, for the leaves of trees. 



98 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

During the time the Candidate is in preparation, the Companions 
within the Chapter prepare the room for his reception in a manner 
which will be seen after his introduction. All things being in readi- 
ness, he is taken in by the three Companions, when the first thing that 
meets his eye is a large arch situated directly over the Temple,* and 
reaching nearly to the ceiling. (This arch is composed of several 
pieces, which are kept in a large chest under lock and key, that they 
may not be seen by brethren of a lower degree; and when used in the 
Chapter, are fastened together with screws.) 

In the center of this arch, i. e., where the key stone is usually 
placed, it is discovered that the key stone is gone, and consequently 
the arch meets together in such a manner as to make it irregular. 
The Candidate is then, by means of a ladder of seven rounds, con- 
ducted up to the center of the arch, which is opened, and he is placed 
in the opening instead of the key stone, with his face fronting the 
East,f and his arms extended along over the arch in opposite direc- 
tions. (The two ends of the arch, at the opening, come close under 
his arms, which gives the appearance that the arch is whole, and 
passes directly through his body.) His feet are permitted to rest on 
the roof of the Temple beneath, although I have known very short 
men compelled to support themselves, during the whole ceremony, by 
their arms resting on the arch. This was the intention and custom, 
originally, but for several centuries past it has been found so very 
severe on the Candidate, that the other mode has been adopted. 
Its intention was to teach those who should be exalted to this degree 
' patience and long suffering ' in the cause of truth. When a very 
short man takes this degree, blocks are furnished for his feet to rest 
upon, but this practice was unknown in ancient times; and many 
enlightened Masons question the propriety of it in our days. 

In this situation, the High Priest addresses the Candidate as fol- 
lows: 

' Most Excellent Brother — You are now placed in the situation 
in which all Royal Arch Masons have been placed, previous to receive- 
ing this sublime degree.' 

The H. Priest then administers the following 

* This Temple is about four times as large as the one used in other degrees and is capable 
of containing five or six persons. 

t Speaking of the mode of worship taught by Zoroaster and his'disciples, H. Prideaux, p. 
389, says, ' But this was not a new institution of his : we find in Ezekiel, v. 16, where it is re- 
lated, that the prophet being carried in a vision to Jerusalem, saw, among other things, 
14 about five and twenty men standing between the porch and the altar, with their faces to- 
ward the east." 1 — For the Holy of Holies [in which was the Shechinah of the divine presence 
resting over the mercy-seat and cherubims], being on the western end of the Temple at Jer- 
usalem, all that entered thither to worship God, did it with their faces turned that way, i. e. 
toward the east ; for that was their Kebla or the point toward which they always directed 
their worship. 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 99 

AFFIRMATION.* 

" In the name of the EVERLASTING GOD, the Holy Prophets 
and Evangelists, I do most solemnly affirm, that the degree of Royal 
Arch Mason, or any part thereof, shall never be communicated by 
me to any person or persons in any known world, except to such as 
have taken upon themselves the degrees of Entered Apprentices, 
Fellow-Craft, Master, Mark-Master, Past-Master, Most Excellent 
Master, and Royal Arch Mason (except I am presiding as a High 
Priest over a Chapter, in which case the last named degree is ex- 
cepted) ; and not to those even until I am fully satisfied within my 
own mind that they have legally and lawfully received the same, 
I also solemnly affirm, that I will use my utmost endeavors to preserve 
peace and harmony among my Companions of this degree, when in 
the Chapter, as well as when associated with the world: that I will 
not injure, or suffer to be injured in any manner, a Companion of 
this degree, if within my knowledge and power to prevent: that the 
widows and orphans of 'Companions of this degree, shall receive my 
protection and support, so far as in my power lies, the same as those 
of my own blood. Furthermore do I most solemnly affirm, that I 
will not give the Grand Hailing Sign and Words of a Royal Arch 
Mason, or any or either of them, except when in danger of my life, 
nor then except when in danger of my life, nor then unless I have 
substantial reasons to believe that a Royal Arch Mason is within hail, 
who can save it. Furthermore, that in my intercourse with my 
Fellow-men, I will be upright and just, and never be guilty of any 
act which shall sully the dignity of my profession, or forfeit the 
respect and veneration due to this sublime Institution. In the name 
of the Everlasting God, the Holy Prophets and Evangelists/ 

This constitutes the affirmation of a Royal Arch Mason. The High 
Priest now recites the following: 

' Supreme Architect of Universal Nature, who by thine almighty 
word didst speak into being the stupendous Arch of Heaven, and for 
the instruction and pleasure of thy rational creatures, didst adorn 
us with greater and lesser lights; thereby magnifying thy power, and 
endearing thy goodness unto the sons of men: we humbly adore and 
worship thine unspeakable perfection. We bless thee that when man 
had fallen from his innocence and his happiness, thou didst still 
leave unto him the power of reasoning, and capacity of improvement 
and pleasure. We thank thee that amidst the pains and calamities 
of our present state, so many means of refreshment and satisfaction 
are reserved unto us, while traveling the rugged path of life. Espe- 
cially would we at this time render thee our thanksgiving and praise 
for the Institution, as members of which we are at this time 
assembled, and for all the pleasures we have derived from it. We 
thank thee that the few here assembled before thee, have been favored 
* No Royal Arch Mason is allowed to swear, either iu the Chapter or a Court of Justice. 



100 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

with new inducements, and laid under new and stronger obligations, 
to virtue and holiness. May these obligations, blessed Father, 
have their full effect upon us. Teach us, we pray thee, the true rev- 
erence of thy great, mighty, and terrible name. Inspire us with a firm 
and unshaken resolution in our virtuous pursuits. Give us grace 
diligently to search thy word in the Book of Nature, wherein the 
duties of our high vocation are inculcated with divine authority. May 
the solemnity of the ceremonies of our Institution be duly impressed 
on our minds, and have a lasting and happy effect upon our lives. 
May all thy miracles and mighty works fill us with the dread, and 
thy goodness impress us with the love of thy holy name. May holi- 
ness to the Lord be engraved on all our thoughts, words and actions. 
May the increase of piety ascend continually unto thee from the altar 
of our hearts, and burn day and night as a sacrifice of sweet-smelling 
savor, well pleasing unto thee. And since sin has destroyed within 
us the first temple of purity and innocence, may thy heavenly grace 
guide and assist us in rebuilding a second temple of reformation, and 
may the glory of this latter house be greater than the glory of the 
former. Amen! 

Response: ' 80 mote it be!' 

The center pieces of the arch on which the arms of the Candidate 
are resting are now removed, and the Candidate is told to suffer his 
arms to make their own motion, and as the center pieces are both 
removed at the same time, his arms, of course, drop *by his sides 
with a flap; and this is the due-guard sign of a Royal Arch Mason. 
Perhaps this is the most proper time to instruct the reader in this 
due-guard sign: You will extend your arms in about the same 
direction from your body as though you had a barrel under each, 
though not suffer your fingers to point quite so much toward your 
body as you would in that case; — then bring them down with a flap 
to your sides. This is the due-guard sign of this degree, and alludes 
to the situation of your hands and arms, when you took upon yourself 
the affirmation of a Royal Arch Mason; which was, with your arms 
extended from the center of the arch, towards its base, in a circular 
direction. It will be seen that if the arms were not attached to the 
shoulders, but passed directly through them and joined in the mid- 
dle, a perfect arch would be formed. Care must be taken to prevent 
any sudden bend in the elbows, but let them form a gentle curve, so 
as to resemble, as much as possible, an arch. 

The Candidate is now standing on the top of the Temple, and the 
Royal Arch is moved a foot or two back to give him ample room, 
when the High Priest recites the following passage: 

" I will bring the blind by a way that they know not ; I will lead 
them in paths that they have not known; I will make the darkness 
light before them, and crooked things straight: these things will I do 
unto them, and will QOt forsake them." 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 101 

Here the High Priest descends from his station, and approaches 
the Temple, when by means of the ladder of seven rounds, he ascends 
and stands by the side of the Candidate;* when he opens a trap door 
which the Candidate has not before discovered, and descends, desiring 
him to follow. Being now within the Temple, and the trap door 
closed over their heads, the High Priest proceeds as follows : 

' And when the Lord saw that he turned aside to see, God called 
unto him, out of the midst of the bush, and said/ — -here a Companion 
without the Temple says, ' Moses, Moses ! ' — when the High Priest 
answers, ' Here am 1/ The High Priest continues : ( And he said/ — 
here the Companion without says, 'draw not nigh hither: Put off 
thy shoes from off thy feet, for the place whereon thou standest is 
holy ground/ Here the High Priest takes off his shoes, f and teaches 
the Candidate to do the same. The High Priest continues : ' More- 
over he said/ — here the Companion without (who is the captain of 
the host) says, 'I am the God of thy father, the God of Abraham, 
the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. The High Priest now says, 
— ' and Moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look upon God/ — 
(Here they hide their faces with their hands, and then withdraw 
them again.) They now seat themselves on stools with cushions 
fringed with gold, when the High Priest addresses the Candidate as 
follows : 

* Most Excellent Brother — You ha,ve now arrived within the 
Temple of the living God. Let us bow down our faces to the ground 
and worship the Lord, who is strong and mighty/ (Here they bow 
their faces to the ground.) ' thou who didst aforetime appear unto 
thy servant Moses in the flame of fire out of the midst of a bush, 
enkindle, we beseech thee, in each of our hearts, a flame of devotion 
to thee, of love to each other, and of charity to all mankind.' 

(J should have previously stated, that after the trap door is closed 
over their heads, the only light admitted within the Temple is through 
a transparency on the east side, resembling the rising sun ; but as this 
is only admitted through oiled paper, it affords but a dim light, and 
gives everything around them a gloomy and confused appearance: 
yet, if there is solemnity in any human ceremony, there is in this.) 

They now lift their faces from the ground, and are again seated. 
The High Priest continues : ( I now, Most Excellent Brother, with- 
draw the first vail ! ' Hereupon he pulls a cord, and the outward 
porch of King Solomon's Temple is presented to their view, most 
brilliantly illuminated, with the various Masonic implements used 
in the first degree; rough and perfect ashlars, squares and compasses, 
twenty-four inch gauges, common gavels. Entered Apprentices at 
their labor, &c, &c, when the Master of the first vail speaks from 

* Three generally take this degree on the same evening, but this part of the ceremony is 
never performed on more than one at a time. 
+ Shilo or Shiloh— (Hebrew), putting off one's shoes. 



102 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

without, yet through a tube, which makes his voice sound within the 
first vail: — l Son of - man, mark well the entering in of the gate!' 
Hereupon the High Priest pulls another cord, which raises the second 
vail, when all the paraphernalia pertaining to the second and third 
degrees, appear in the most brilliant colors. The various orders of 
architecture, as explained in the Fellow-Craft's degree; all the em- 
blems which adorn a Master's carpet; Master-Masons at their labors, 
&c, with thousands of other illuminations of the most brilliant colors, 
and variegated hues. Here will be one which vies in its vivid blue 
with the freshest violet; and perhaps adjoining to it, another which 
might dispute superiority with the lily, in its bright scarlet. But it 
is impossible to do justice to this part of the subject. One part, 
however, must not be omitted. 

In the center, through a long perspective view of the middle 
chamber (beyond it however), is seen the Sanctum Sanctorum, or 
Holy of Holies. King Hiram is seen lying prostrate on the floor, 
surrounded by several of his brethren, weeping. A coffin lies by his 
side, with the circle of letters on it, as explained in the Mark Degree. 
On the right, a large pedestal, or rather monument, with the words 
' VIRTUE AND INTEGRITY on its front; and on the left, death's 
skull and cross-bones, with a bright flower flourishing directly over it. 
But I find these things cannot be intelligibly conveyed on paper. 

After they have viewed these transparencies a few moments, the 
Master of the second vail speaks through a tube, ' Imitate the virtues 
of departed Innocence ! ' — The High Priest here withdraws the third 
and last vail; and here I feel myself wholly incompetent to convey 
even a faint idea of the beauties presented to view; I shall attempt, 
however the more important. 

In the center of the panorama, is a magnificent Royal Arch, illumi- 
nated with all the variegated hues which human ingenuity can invent. 
Thousands of small glass lamps, of all colors imaginable, are sus- 
pended on either side from the center. The blaze is so dazzling, that 
the eyes have often been injured to that degree, as to render it neces- 
sary to wear goggles after viewing it. In the center of this arch. 
is seen a human being, in the same situation as the Candidate was 
placed a short time before; and the surrounding brilliancies give a 
lustre to the whole scene, too vivid for the mortal eye to behold. By 
machinery prepared by ingenious Masons, the man in the center of 
the arch is seen gradually to ascend, and a proper Key Stone takes 
his place, and appears firmly fixed. On the stone are the circular 
letters, and as the man ascends to give it room he is distinctly heard 
to say, ' He That Was Slain Soars To Kindred Spirits ; ' but in fact, 
these expressions are made by the Master of the third vail through 
the tube ; but the illusion is so complete, that one can imagine he sees 
the lips move. 

Satisfied as I am that I have presented but a very imperfect picture 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 103 

of this part of the ceremony, I shall willingly withdraw from this 
'holy ground/ The High Priest now drops the scene, and the same 
glimmering sun entering on the East side, is the only light they 
receive. The High Priest now ascends the ladder of the seven 
rounds (which was taken from the outside and placed down through 
the trap door, before they descended), desiring the Candidate to fol- 
low; and in a few minutes, having put on their shoes and slippers, 
they are again standing on the top of the Temple, surrounded by all 
the Companions present. This seems to the Candidate like emerging 
from a world of spirits into a world of mortals; and in truth the 
sudden transition is such as to make an impression on the mind which 
can never be removed. 

The Candidate is again exalted to his station in the Arch, with his 
face toward the East, when the High Priest withdraws the ladder 
and placing it on the outside of the Temple, descends, and proceeds 
to his station in the East, when he addresses the Candidate as fol- 
lows: 

' Most Excellent Brother — You are now entitled to a full explana- 
tion of all the arcana upon which this degree is founded. We learn 
by a Masonic tradition that at the time Adam was created from the 
dust, on the very day of his creation, as he was seated on a little 
eminence under the shade of a fig-tree, an angel appeared before him 
with a scroll in his right hand, and addressed Adam as follows, in 
the Hebrew language : " Lo, Man, beware of the temptation which 
will be offered unto thee. I am sent by thy Maker to warn thee from 
the death to which thou wilt be exposed, shouldst thou listen to other 
counsel than that which the Lord thy God hath implanted within 
thine own bosom : beware, therefore, of temptation. Lo, Man ! Look 
upon this ! " Here the angel unrolled the scroll, which contained 
Hebrew characters answering to these in our language.' 

Here the High Priest unrolls a scroll (which he takes from a box 
which has the appearance of gold, with some Hebrew characters on 
it) when the Candidate discovers, in large letters — "LORD EVER- 
LASTING, EVERLASTING LORD ! »*— The High Priest con- 
tinues : These, Companion, are the words of a Royal Arch Mason, 
which you have solemnly affirmed never to utter, saye when your life 
is in imminent danger, nor then, unless you have substantial reason 
to believe a Companion is within hail, who can save it. The sign 
acompanying these expressions, you will receive in due time.' 

The High Priest now wraps up the scroll, replaces it in the box, 
and continues: 

f Having said this, the angel presented the scroll'to Adam, and dis« 

* In Jewish Chapters these words are given in the Hebrew language : " ADONAI OULEM, 
OULEM ADONAI." It will be discovered that these words read the same backward and for 
ward, in accordance with many passages in the Scripture which declare the Lord is, ' with- 
out beginning or ending ' ' the first and last,' ' the Alpha and Omega,' ' without turning, or tb- 
shadow of a change,' etc. 



104 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

appeared from his sight. After the creation of Eve, Adam related 
unto her the circumstance of the angel, and showed her the scroll; 
but Eve would not hearken unto his counsel. She partook of the for- 
bidden fruit, and did eat, and through her entreaties, Adam also. 
After this they were ashamed and clothed themselves in aprons of 
fig-leaves, gathered from the very tree under which Adam sat when 
the angel appeared unto him. You are thus clad this evening, Com- 
panion, the better to impress upon your mind the warning given by 
the angel unto Adam; and now, in the language of the angel, I 
caution thee to beware of all temptations which will be presented unto 
thee, in all thy travels through the rugged paths of life/ 

Here the High Priest descends, and proceeds to the temple, which 
he ascends by the ladder of seven rounds, and continues: 

1 And by obedience to this warning voice, may you prepare yourself 
a Crown of Glory in the heavens, transcending in brilliant diadema 
the one which I now present you, as spiritual things transcend ma- 
terial.' 

Here a Companion presents to the High Priest a splendid crown, 
encircled around with ' HOLINESS TO THE LORD/ which he 
places on the head of the newly-exalted Companion, when all present 
exclaim Holiness to the Lord! ' The High Priest then continues the 
tradition : 

' This scroll, which the angel gave unto Adam, was handed down 
from father to son, until the building of the Temple by Solomon, and 
was by him used when this degree was conferred to teach candidates 
the words of this degree, which were first given by the Lord to Adam, 
through the angel. As these words could not be uttered except when 
life was endangered, and as no part of them could be written or en- 
graved, upon anything movable or immovable, this was the only in- 
strument by which they could be taught. This scroll was always 
intrusted to the care of Hiram Abbiff, who so well knew the import- 
ance of his charge, that, unknown to Solomon, or any other person, 
he caused a deep vault to be made under the southernmost part of the 
Temple, and so completely arched over and covered, that the most 
penetrating eye could not discover it. To effect this, he procured 
laborers from a foreign country, and bound them by a solemn oath 
never to divulge it. The entrance to this vault was through the wall 
of the room wherein King Hiram formed his designs, previous to 
laying them down on the Trestle-board ; and the door of the entrance 
was so nicely contrived, that no human eye could notice any difference 
in the wall ; and it v never was discovered unto this day. 

' In this vault King Hiram deposited this scroll, and never removed 
it except on occasions like the present. After the death of this worthy 
brother, in the melancholy manner related in the third degree, these 
words were lost and were nowhere to be found. Strict search was 
made in the most secret recesses of the sanctum sanctorum, all to no 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 105 

purpose. The sudden death of Hiram was a sad blow to Masonry. 
This scroll lay buried in darkness in this vault for the space of four 
hundred and seventy years, during which period Royal Arch Masonry 
may be said to have slept. 

' Some time after the rebuilding of the second Temple by Zerub- 
babel and his companions, this vault and scroll were discovered in the 
following singular manner: 

i A Lodge of Master-Masons was sitting in a lower room of the 
Temple directly over this vault, the floor of which, near the south- 
west corner, was somewhat decayed; and by some accident a brother 
stepped on a plank which partially gave way, and in saving himself, 
his trowel dropped through the opening on the ground underneath the 
floor.' The High Priest now recites the following passages: 

' For there was a tabernacle made; the first, wherein was the 
candlestick, and the table, and the shew-bread; which is called the 
sanctuary. And after the vails, the tabernacle, which is called, The 
Holiest of all, which had the golden censer, and the ark of the cove- 
nant overlaid round about with gold, wherein was the golden pot that 
had manna, and Aaron's rod that budded, and the tables of the 
covenant; and over it the cherubims of glory, shadowing the mercy- 
seat; of which we cannot now speak particularly.' 

' In that day will I raise up the tabernacle of David that is fallen, 
and close up the breaches thereof, and I will raise up his ruins, and I 
will build it as in the days of old.' 

' In the beginning was the word, and the word was with God, and 
the word was God.' After reciting these passages from Scripture, 
the High Priest proceeds with the tradition: 

i This accident causing a slight interruption in their labors, a part 
of the flooring was removed, when the brother stepped down on the 
ground to reach his trowel, when it gave way beneath his feet, and 
he was precipitated to the bottom of the vault, a distance of full 
fifteen feet ! A ladder was now provided, and eight other brethren 
descended with lights, when it was found that the brother who had 
fallen through the decayed arch, had received a serious fracture in the 
fall, on the top of his head; and having his hands clasped together 
by the fingers, was pressing them on the fracture to prevent the 
effusion of blood. He pressed them on so hard that it was with diffi- 
culty the brethren could remove them. On examining the apartment, 
a box was found of pure gold, firmly locked, with the key-hole in the 
exact form of the letter G, on the top was engraved " Hiram Abbiff 
— Sacred." The brethren immediately recollected that a- key in the 
form of the letter G had been preserved in the archives of the Lodge 
from time immemorial, and none of them had known the use of it ; and 
on calling to their brethren above, it was thrown down to them, when 
they easily unlocked their treasure, and to their great joy found the 
long lost scroll, containing the sacred words: and before ascending 



106 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

they agreed that the grand hailing-sign of this degree, should there- 
after be the one made by the brother who had received the injury ; and 
r.hould only be given when life was in danger; nor then unless there 
tv r as a prospect that it might thereby be preserved. 

c This sign is given by shoving all the fingers of each hand between 
each other lengthwise, keeping the hands flat with the backs up, and 
each thumb poiuting directly toward your body ; and then raise them 
in this situation very slowly, considerably above your head (directly 
over it), so as to form an arch; then bring them down on the top of 
your head, pressing down heavy on it, at the same time pulling slowly, 
so as in a short time to let the fingers slip from between each other, 
and your arms and hands drop down by your side with a flap. This 
sign, Companion, is the grand hailing sign of this degree, and can 
only be given as agreed on by the nine brethren in the vault, when 
it may be accompanied by the words on the scroll. 

' After forming this agreement, the nine brethren ascended the lad- 
der, and, acquainting the rest of the brethren of their discoveries, 
they all entered into a solemn contract to conform to it. The name 
of the brother who received the injury (of which he shortly recovered) 
was Nebat, who was ever after complimented by his brethren for 
having dropped his trowel through the crevice in the floor, as it had 
been the means of restoring to the Masonic Fraternity that which 
might otherwise have remained in darkness forever. 

i I have further to inform you, Companion, that the key of this 
golden tabernacle, which was in the form of the letter G, our Grand 
Master, Hiram Abbiff, ever carried in a pocket near his left breast — 
and near his heart. Thus he carried it, when he was slain by the 
ruffians, and falling on his left side, it made the faint impression 
which was discovered on that part of his body after it was found. 
After the ruffians had slain him, they searched his body, and took 
from his pocket this key; but not knowing the use of it, they threw 
it among the clefts of the rocks at the time they were detected and 
taken, where it was found a short time after by some Master-Masons 
who were examining the spot — who also not knowing the use of it, 
it was laid up in the archives of the Lodge by order of King Solomon, 
where it had remained useless until the period when the discovery 
was accidentally made which I have just related to you. You are 
now made acquainted with the principal ground-work of this degree: 
but in the Lecture you will discover innumerable beauties which 
cannot be made fo appear at this time. 

' You are now, Companion, exalted to the sublime degree of Royal 
Arch Mason.' 

The Candidate is now taken down from the arch, and conducted to 
the private room and reclothed, and then conveyed before the High 
Priest in the East, who gives him the following 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 107 



CHARGE. 

e Worthy Companion : By the consent and assistance of the mem- 
bers of this Chapter, you are now exalted to the sublime and honorable 
degree of a Royal Arch Mason. 

' Having attained this degree, you have arrived at the summit and 
perfection of ancient Masonry ; and are consequently entitled to a full 
explanation of the mysteries of the Order. 

' The rites and mysteries developed in this degree have been handed 
down through a chosen few, unchanged by time, and uncontrolled by 
prejudice ; and we expect and trust, they will be regarded by you with 
the same veneration, and transmitted with the same scrupulous purity 
to your successors. 

' No one can reflect on the ceremonies of gaining admission into 
this place, without being forcibly struck with the important lessons 
which they teach. 

' Here we are necessarily led to contemplate with gratitude and 
admiration the sacred source from whence all earthly comforts flow; 
here we find additional inducements to continue steadfast and im- 
movable in the discharge of our respective duties; and here we are 
bound, by the most solemn ties, to promote each other's welfare, and 
correct each other's failings, by advice, admonition and reproof. 

6 As it is our most earnest desire, and a duty we owe to our Com- 
panions of this Order, that the admission of every Candidate into this 
Chapter shall be attended by the approbation of the most scrutinizing 
eye, we hope always to possess the satisfaction of finding none amongst 
us, but such as will promote to the utmost of their power the great 
end of our Institution. By paying due attention to this determina- 
tion, we expect you will never recommend any Candidate to this 
Chapter, whose abilities and knowledge of the foregoing degrees, you 
cannot freely vouch for, and who you do not firmly and confidently 
believe will fully conform to the principles of our Order, and fulfill 
the obligations of a Royal Arch Mason. While such are our members, 
we may expect to be united in one object, without lukewarmness, inat- 
tention or neglect; but zeal, fidelity, and affection, will be the dis- 
tinguishing characteristics of our society, and that satisfaction, har- 
mony and peace may be enjoyed at our meetings, which no other 
society can afford/ 

The Chapter is then closed with similar ceremonies to those used 
at opening, which it is useless here to recapitulate. Were I to insert 
all the ceremonies and passages practiced and read' during the con- 
ferring of this degree, they of themselves would fill a book consider- 
ably larger than the New Testament — as any one may discover who 
will visit a Chapter, and remain present during the conferring of this 
degree. 



108 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

The Chapter being closed with solemn ceremonies, the following 
prayer is rehearsed by the Most .Excellent High Priest: 

' By the Wisdom of the Supreme High Priest may we be directed, 
by his Strength may we be enabled, and by the Beauty of virtue may 
we be incited, to perform the obligations here enjoined on us; to 
keep inviolably the mysteries here unfolded to us, and invariably to 
practice all those duties out of the Chapter, which are inculcated in 
it.' 

Response: 'So mote it be!' 'Amen! 

The Companions then disperse, and the Captain of the Host sees 
that the Temple, Royal Arch, &c, are properly disposed of; and thus 
'oncludes the ceremony of conferring this degree. 



HB MEANS TO BB USED BY SUCH AS ARE NOT MASONS TO GAIN ADMISSION INTO ANY CHAPTER OF ROYAt 
ARCH MASONS ON THE FACE OF THE GLOBE. 

In this degree it is seldom that more is required of a visitor, than 
barely the due-guard sign, as it is so utterly impossible that any one 
not having taken this degree should be in the possession of it; but 
sometimes a stranger who claims admission is taken into the private 
room, and undergoes the following examination: 

Applicant. I claim admission into this Chapter of Royal Arch Ma- 
sons. 

R. A. Mason. By what rights do you claim admission ? 

Applicant. By the rights of the Royal Arch. [Here give the due 
guard sign as directed in page 100.] 

R. A. Mason. To what does that allude ? 

Applicant. To my situation in the Royal Arch, when I was exalted 
to this degree. 

R. A. Mason. I am satisfied, Most Excellent Companion, that your 
claims to admission into our Holy Sanctuary are well founded. 

You will then be introduced, when, as in the preceding degree, you 
will proceed to the center of the floor, give the due-guard sign, and 
there take a seat. 

ENS OF THE SEVENTH, AND LAST DEGREE OF ANCIENT MASONRY. 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 109 



RECAPITULATION. 



I shall now recapitulate the Due-Guard Signs, Grand Hailing- 
Figns of Distress Words, Words of Distress, &c. of the several degrees, 
which will give the reader a more condensed view of the necessary pre- 
requisites to his gaining admission into Chapters and Lodges. 

A Mark-Master places his hands behind him, with the backs to- 
gether, and brings them round together in front, crossing each other 
(the right one uppermost), with a loud clap, four times in succession. 
This is called the Mark-Master's Due-Guard Sign and Clap. The 
Grand Hailing-Sign of this degree, or Sign of Distress, is made by 
raising the right arm in a horizontal position, pointing forward with 
the fore-finger (the rest being closed), and forming in the air the 
letter K, with a period, or dot after it, and then letting the arm drop 
by the side with a flap; again raise the arm, and form in the air the 
letter S, with a period, or dot after it, and then suffer the arm to drop 
by the side with a flap, as before. The Grip of a Mark-Master is 
gi/en by pressing the thumb-nail into the upper joint, or last joint 
from the nail, of the third finger of the right hand. Its name is 
CHAOS. 

A Past-Master places his hands flat before him, with the backs up, 
suffering the ends of his two fore-fingers and thumbs to meet so as 
to form a triangle ; then raises them to his face so as to look through 
the two lower angles, and in a few seconds lets them part, and drop 
by each hip with a flap. The words accompanying this sign (on 
proper occasions), are Triangle of Truth. There was no Grip 
to this degree, anciently, but some modern Past Masters press the 
thumb between the third and little finger of the right hand, and call 
it the pass or past-Griip of this degree; and then passing the thumb 
along to the upper joint of the little finger, press in the nail, and 
call it the Grip of a Past-Master, and give it the name of Chibbilum, 
which name, they say, signifies Triangle. 

A Most Excellent Master places his hands flat before him, with 
the backs up, with the right thumb crossing the left thumb at the 
joint, and the right fore-finger crossing the left fore-finger at the 
first joint, the other fingers of each hand stretched as far as possible 
from each fore-finger; he then raises them in this situation in front 
of his face, and then lets them separate and drop by his side with a 
flap. This is the Due-Guard Sign of a Most Excellent Master. The 
Grand Hailing-Sign of this degree, or Sign of Distress, is given by 
covering the eyes with the left hand, the thumb pointing in a pep 



110 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

pendicular direction, and reaching along ever the left temple. The 
words accompanying this sign (on proper occasions), or. words of 
distress are these. " AND THE GLORY OF THE LORD FILLED 
THE liOUSE;" or, " ELOI ! ELOI ! LAMA SA^BACTHANAI? 
or, " MY GOD ! MY GOD ! WHY HAST THOU FORSAKEN 
ME ?" 

A Royal Arch Mason raises his arms as if he held a barrel under 
each arm, and brings them down on each side, with a flap. This 
is called the Due-Guard Sign of a Royal Arch Mason. The Grand 
Hailing-Sign of this degree, or Sign of Distress, is given as follows : 
hold your hands before you with their backs up, with the fingers 
pointing toward each other and each thumb pointing toward your 
body; then shove the fingers of each hand between each other, so as 
to make them firmly interwoven together; in this situation raise them 
slowly over your head, so that the arms thus joined together by the 
hands, resemble an arch; then bring the hands (yet joined) down 
on the top of the head, pressing down hard on the same, and at the 
same time pulling with each hand, and in a few seconds permit the 
fingers to slip from between each other, and let your hands drop 
down by your side with a flap. This is the Grand Hailing-Sign of 
a Royal Arch Mason, or Sign of Distress; and the words of distress 
accompanying it (only spoken when life is in danger), are "LORD 
EVERLASTING, EVERLASTING LORD ! " or, in the Hebrew 
language, " ADONAI OULEM, OULEM ADONAI ! " 



EXPLANATION. 



Having thus completed this Key, &c, I may now be allowed to 
say a few words in extenuation of conduct which must appear of the 
basest and blackest character, to every man of any sensibility, and 
to Royal Arch Masons in particular. The latter, I am aware, will 
never forgive me; but all who do not belong to the Institution, be 
they eve* so scrupulous of their word and yet a hundred times more 
scrupulous of their oath, will frankly and cordially acknowledge that 
I have done no wrong, when they shall know all. I have no doubt 
but the reader has pronounced me a perjured wretch, more than 
once, while perusing these pages; but not quite so fast — hear the 
sequel. 

I have said, ( In this degree, it is seldom that more is required of 
a visitor than the due-guard sign, as it is so utterly impossible that 
any one not having taken this degree, should be in the possession of it.' 

This is all very true; and it is to this fact that the reader is in- 
debted for the pages now before him ; for were Royal Arch Masons as 
scrutinizing in their examination of strangers, as they are in the three 



MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. Ill 

first degrees, these illustrations could never have been presented to 
the public, as it cannot be supposed any being could be found suf- 
ficiently base to violate oaths of the most sacred nature, — much 
less could such a being be found within the veil of the Masonic sanc- 
tuary. 

Several years since, a person in Boston, not a Mason, chanced to see 
one, whom he knew to be a Royal Arch Mason, give the due-guard 
sign, explained in this degree, to another person. This Mason, having 
given the sign, turned round and discovered that he had been seen by 
one not a Mason, and seeming much confused and embarrassed, fell 
to making all manner of unmeaning signs, which this person, who was 
not a Mason of any degree, rightly enough conjectured were intended 
to blind him, and cause him to forget the real and true sign, which 
he had plainly seen with his own eyes. But not so: he harbored it up 
in his mind, and rolled it as a sweet morsel under his tongue, not that 
he intended any ill to the Craft, for he had always revered the Insti- 
tution, but that he had got a glimpse into that mystic science which 
set human scrutiny at defiance : I need no longer conceal the fact, that 
I myself, the writer of these pages, was the person, ' not a Mason/ 

My friend of the Arch degree I saw frequently, but never hinted to 
him anything of the sign, nor, of course, he to me. I had heard 
before, that Masons gave signs when they met at the Tyler at the 
door, which gained them admittance; but my chief difficulty was to 
ascertain to what particular degree this sign belonged. This puzzled 
me considerably. Things passed on for several months in this way, 
without putting my sign to the test; as I dare as well cut my throat 
as attempt to visit a Lodge or Chapter in Boston, where this man of 
the due-guard sign would be liable to detect me. So, having some 
business in New York City, I thought that an excellent opportunity 
to try my sign, and learn if it would pass current. Accordingly, on 
the first night of my arrival I inquired of my landlord, if a Lodge met 
in the city that evening, and he told me one did, and that, too, in an 
upper story of the house I was in ! 

This rather startled me, to think I was so near the threshold, which 
would either gratify my eager curiosity, or. perhaps, cause my dis- 
grace; and more especially, when the landlord told me that he was 
then going up, and ' would be very glad to see me there after supper/ 
I determined, however, to venture at all hazards, and accordingly, 
after supper, I groped my way up into the fourth story, as directed 
by the landlord, where I found the Tyler in his shirt sleeves, with a 
drawn sword. Never shall I forget my feelings at that instant: I 
would have given worlds had I remained down stairs, and held my 
tongue, instead of babbling to the landlord about Lodges and Masonry ; 
but there was no backing out — the stair-way was a very narrow and 
strait one, and I could make no reasonable excuse, as that of having 
missed my way, &c. I accordingly sneaked up to the Tyler, and bid- 



112 MORGAN'S FREEMASONRY. 

ding him a good evening, which he very civilly returned, I told him I 
would like to visit his Lodge. 

He then asked me if any brother could vouch for me. I told him I 
did not know, as I was an entire stranger in the place; but I presumed 
that would satisfy him. Here I gave the due-guard sign spoken of 
above, and he, nearly at the same time, gave three knocks at the door 
which immediately opened, and whispered to the person who opened 
it that a stranger wished to be examined, without noticing my sign in 
the least; and the door immediately closed. 

Now the truth was, as the reader may well suppose, I did not wish 
te> be examined, especially after the reception my sign had met with 
the eyes of the Tyler; and I had just begun to say I believed I would 
call again, and had half turned round, when the door opened, and out 
popped three Masons with aprons on, one of whom, to my utter con- 
fusion, I instantly recognized as my landlord ! i This is the gentle- 
man,' said the Tyler, i who wishes to be examined/ — ' I believe/ said 
I, ' I will call another ' — ' 0/ said the landlord, ' it will take but a 
minute ; ' — and by this time, rather than be suspected of being an 
impostor for one moment, I had suffered myself to be led into the 
private room by my kind landlord, for the purpose of proving myself 
one the next. 

'How many degrees have you taken?' asked the landlord.* I 
here gave the due-guard sign, as well as my trembling frame would 
permit. Here the landlord requested one of the brethren to leave 
us for a few minutes; and he had no sooner gone out, then the land- 
lord told me that that brother was only a Master-Mason, and that I 
was very indiscreet in giving that sign, without first being satisfied 
that all present were Royal Arch Masons/ He then said that all was 
now safe, and perhaps it would be as well to examine on the Royal 
Arch degree at once, as it would save time. I stood motionless. At 
length the landlord asked ' By what rights do you claim admission ?' 
Here I again gave the due-guard sign; and had I known enough to 
have first said: f By the rights of the Royal Arch' all had been well; 
but I said nothing, and stood like an aspen leaf. The two stared at 
each other, and at length the landlord said, ' To what does that 
allude ?' I here again, like a fool, gave the due-guard sign — and 
they stared at each other more than ever, and whispered to each 
other. ***********. Af- length I was permitted to slink 
down stairs, pay my bill at the bar, and depart in peace to seek new 
lodgings. 

* I have since become convinced that they all, the landlord in particular, took me to be a 
Mason ; and my exposure was not their fault, but my own. 



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